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Morrissey College of Arts and Sciences

Irish Language and Literature

english department

English Electives Offered Fall 2017

 

This course continues in second semester as ENGL1094
This course offers beginners an enjoyable introduction to the language and culture of Ireland. We’ll learn how to speak Gaelic and read modern Irish texts and poetry. And we’ll examine major themes in Irish history and culture associated with the rise and fall of the language over its long history. This courses count towards your Irish Studies minor, and one towards your English major. In the spring semester, you can build on what you’ve gained and, if you wish, satisfy the Morrissey College of Arts and Sciences language proficiency requirement by completing the four-course cycle the following year.

Joseph Nugent

ENGL1093 An Introduction to Modern Irish I (Fall:3.0)

This course continues in second semester as ENGL1094
This course offers beginners an enjoyable introduction to the language and culture of Ireland. We’ll learn how to speak Gaelic and read modern Irish texts and poetry. And we’ll examine major themes in Irish history and culture associated with the rise and fall of the language over its long history. This courses count towards your Irish Studies minor, and one towards your English major. In the spring semester, you can build on what you’ve gained and, if you wish, satisfy the Morrissey College of Arts and Sciences language proficiency requirement by completing the four-course cycle the following year.
Joseph Nugent

Prerequisites: ENGL1094 or equivalent

This is a continuing course in modern Irish for those with a basic knowledge of the language. We’ll emphasize the ability to read contemporary literature in various genres. Texts from a variety of authors and historical periods allow students to taste different writing styles: contemporary fiction, journalism, literary criticism, historical and cultural texts, while we enjoy Irish-language short films and videos.

Joseph Nugent

ENGL2097 Continuing Modern Irish I (Fall:3.0)
Prerequisites: ENGL1094 or equivalent

This is a continuing course in modern Irish for those with a basic knowledge of the language. We’ll emphasize the ability to read contemporary literature in various genres. Texts from a variety of authors and historical periods allow students to taste different writing styles: contemporary fiction, journalism, literary criticism, historical and cultural texts, while we enjoy Irish-language short films and videos.
Joseph Nugent
ENGL2097 Continuing Modern Irish I (Fall:3.0)
Prerequisites: ENGL1094 or equivalent

This is a continuing course in modern Irish for those with a basic knowledge of the language. We’ll emphasize the ability to read contemporary literature in various genres. Texts from a variety of authors and historical periods allow students to taste different writing styles: contemporary fiction, journalism, literary criticism, historical and cultural texts, while we enjoy Irish-language short films and videos.
Joseph Nugent

Fulfills the pre-1700 requirement.

This course will explore the vernacular heroic literature of the insular Celts, that is, the Irish and the Welsh. Particular attention will be paid to the effect of Christian transmission on pagan source material, mythological survivals, the heroic worldview and value system, the nature of insular Celtic kingship, and the role of women in the heroic literature.

Philip O'Leary

ENGL2101 Celtic Heroic Age (Spring:3.0)

Fulfills the pre-1700 requirement.
This course will explore the vernacular heroic literature of the insular Celts, that is, the Irish and the Welsh. Particular attention will be paid to the effect of Christian transmission on pagan source material, mythological survivals, the heroic worldview and value system, the nature of insular Celtic kingship, and the role of women in the heroic literature.
Philip O'Leary

How can a tiny island and its diaspora have so shaped the literature, film, music, art, science, and politics of the world? From charming backwater to center of technology, from bastion of Catholicism to gay marriage, through peace and conflict, Irishness (and Irish-Americanness) is an ever-unstable proposition. Exploring through categories such as gender, sexuality, and ethnicity its manifold mutations, this course will investigate the troubled stream of Irish history and culture from Jonathan Swift to Stephen Colbert, from W.B.Yeats to Riverdance, from JFK to U2—from Celtic Christianity to Celtic Tiger.

Joseph Nugent

ENGL2208 Explore the Irish: An Introduction to Irish Studies (Fall:3.0)

How can a tiny island and its diaspora have so shaped the literature, film, music, art, science, and politics of the world? From charming backwater to center of technology, from bastion of Catholicism to gay marriage, through peace and conflict, Irishness (and Irish-Americanness) is an ever-unstable proposition. Exploring through categories such as gender, sexuality, and ethnicity its manifold mutations, this course will investigate the troubled stream of Irish history and culture from Jonathan Swift to Stephen Colbert, from W.B.Yeats to Riverdance, from JFK to U2—from Celtic Christianity to Celtic Tiger.
Joseph Nugent

This course will introduce students to one of the most important literary and cultural movements of the 20th century--the Irish Literary Revival. We will study the poetry, prose, and drama of the Revival in their broader contexts, including works by W. B. Yeats, J. M. Synge, Augusta Gregory, and Douglas Hyde. We will also engage the Revival's critics, such as James Joyce and G. B. Shaw. In addition, students will learn how to work with the special collections related to the Revival in the Irish archives of the Burns Library.

Marjorie Howes

Queens, Cathleens, and Wild Irish Girls – Women in Irish Literature Before 1900

Fulfills the pre-1900 requirement

Long before Joyce, there was Sydney Owenson—a writer with as much wit and even more audacity.  This course explores pre-1900 Irish literature and culture from the unique perspective of the Irish woman. Women came in all shapes and forms in early Irish and English writing: queens, faeries, hags, vampires, and, most importantly, writers themselves. We will study how women formulated the Irish novel, asking questions like, what is the relationship between history and sexuality, imperialism and literature, myth and reality, the “wild” native woman and the Landlord?  Selected authors include: Sydney Owenson, Maria Edgeworth, W.B. Yeats, Elizabeth Gaskell, as well as Irish language poets.

Colleen Taylor    

 

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