Skip to main content

Secondary navigation:

Woods College of Advancing Studies



ADSO 113001  Deviant Behavior and Social Control
A look at patterns of deviant behavior such as crime, drug abuse, unconventional sexual behavior, suicide and mental illness. Course examines how people define and respond to deviant behavior, issues of punishment and victim compensation; theories of social control and power; implications for social policy and change.
Wed 6:15–9:15, Jan 20–May 11, The Department

ADSO 136501  Law and Society
Radical changes in the basic social fabric that dictate how people live, interact, communicate and work with one another create new demands for a legal system obligated to interpret and establish law. Examines emerging challenges to freedom of expression, public and private communication: cyberspace, bullying, the disparity of access to resources, family protection, national security and individual rights, and different ways of representing justice. It also explores how the balance of emotion and reason in our idea of justice “shifts” over time, corporate responsibility/irresponsibility, new definition of guilt and innocence, what is just/unjust social behavior, can citizens depend on the legal system, what holds society together.
Thurs 6:15–9:15, Jan 21–May 12, James Menno

ADSO 250101  Sociological Theories
Sociological theory explores many complex questions that people have pondered for centuries, including the nature of human interdependence and how it evolves, inequality and why it is tolerated, social change and how it occurs, and social order and how it is maintained. This course introduces students to the major thinkers, classic texts, and relevant theoretical questions that have been and continue to be central perspectives within sociology. Through examining both classic and contemporary schools of sociological thought, we explore the basis for many of the core questions, debates, and methodological approaches within the discipline of sociology. Attention is paid to social and intellectual contexts, conceptual frameworks and methods, and contributions to contemporary social analysis. Throughout this course, we will also consider the application of theory and how these emergent ideas are relevant for contemporary society and current sociological research.
Tues 6:15–9:15, Jan 19–May 10, Eve Spangler



Please note: This page links to PDF files. Use this link to download Adobe Reader if needed.