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Woods College of Advancing Studies

Summer 2017 Graduate Courses

For the most up-to-date course information, please use the Course Information and Schedule.

Boston College offers students two Summer Sessions:

Summer Session I: May 16, 2017 - June 22, 2017
Summer Session II: June 26, 2017 - August3, 2017

Undergraduate Students

Woods College undergraduate students may enroll in undergraduate summer courses through the Boston College Summer Session.  Please speak with your advisor about course selection before registering.
 

Graduate Students

Most Woods College of Advancing Studies graduate courses are available only to students in a WCAS Master's program.  A few graduate courses are available to non-degree students; please see course descriptions below for courses which may be taken by non-degree students.  Non-degree students registering for WCAS graduate courses must have a bachelor's degree from an accredited institution. Non-degree students may register in St. Mary's Hall South beginning April 15, 2017.
 

THE FOLLOWING WOODS COLLEGE GRADUATE COURSES ARE AVAILABLE TO DEGREE and non-degree STUDENTS.

ADGR 770301  Research Methods and Data Analysis
* This course may be taken by non-degree students.*
This course introduces students to basic social science research methods. The primary objective is for students to learn to read and evaluate research as well as create contributions to their chosen profession or field of research. By the end of the course, students will be more knowledgeable of basic research design and statistical methods. Additionally, students will better understand how to use research findings to improve and enhance their professional roles.  
NOTE: This course is required for all students who entered the MS Administrative Studies program AFTER June 1st, 2014. Please see an academic advisor to ensure appropriate placement in course.
May 17–June 21, M W, 6:00–9:15 p.m.
Susan Bradley

ADGR 770801  Project Management
ADGR770801 Syllabus
* This course may be taken by non-degree students.*
This course introduces students to the basic tenets and components involved in project management. The primary objective is to provide frameworks that make it possible to track and measure project performance, overcome challenges, and adapt to changes in a variety of professional environments. Specific topics covered in the course include project scope, time, cost, quality, human resources, communications, risk and stakeholder management and a variety of other operational issues that emerge during project planning, initiation, monitoring, and execution.
July 10–July 14, M T W TH F, 9:00 a.m-5:00 p.m.
Charles Coakley and Aza Chirkova

   

Graduate students enrolled in a degree program in another BC school must receive the permission of their own school to register for a WCAS graduate course.
 

ADEC 736001  Financial Economics
ADEC736001 Syllabus
This course teaches the practical application of finance theory to decisions made in industry. We will learn how individuals and firms choose investment portfolio decisions under uncertainty with a particular focus on topics such as the capital asset pricing model, market imperfections, borrowing constraints, market efficiency and security valuation. Understanding how interest rates, exchange rates, and risk work will aid your understanding of multiple firm problems such as why does a firm chooses a specific investment or place of manufacturing. In addition, studying term structures and discounted cash flows are important to understanding the decision to invest over time.
ONLINE  June 26–Aug 4, Danielle Zanzalari
FULLY ONLINE COURSE - Asynchronous. No days or times are specified; students must participate weekly per all communications and instructions from the professor, must adhere to course schedule, and submit all course work on time.

ADEC 739001  Empirical Money and Banking
Pre-requisites: Applied Microeconomic Theory, Applied Macroeconomic Theory, Data Analysis, and Econometrics, or approval of the instructor.
ADEC739001 Syllabus
This course focuses on a study of money, banking and financial markets with a clear emphasis on central banking and conduct of monetary policy.  An in depth analysis of fixed income markets in addition to equities and other financial instruments in this course provides students with the opportunity to master intricacies of financial markets and investing in them. Additionally, the connection between movements in the financial markets and monetary policy is examined on a daily basis. An extended use of Bloomberg Professional LP in this course makes this very applied class particularly valuable to anyone interested in bridging the gap between the economic theory and practice.  
June 27–Aug 3, T TH, 6:00–9:15 p.m.
Hossein Kazemi


ADEC 750001  Ethics, Economics, and Public Policy
ADEC750001 Syllabus
The focus of the course is to ascertain how public policy makers decide to either regulate or legislate how an industry/firm will operate in society. We will examine the process from three different vantage points: ethics, economics, and policy. the first part of the course will be spent examining the role (or lack thereof!) that ethical thinking plays in motivating public policy makers to take action. The second part of the course examines how economic pressure comes into play as policy makers try to establish bounds on an industry or a firm. Finally, we explore the role that social pressures such as the media and various interest groups play in influencing how public policy makers react to various issues that confront an industry or a firm.
May 17–June 21, M W, 6:00–9:15 p.m.
Richard McGowan


ADEC 888001  Directed Practicum
Department permission required from the Applied Economics Program Director.
Directed Practicum course allows students in the MS in Applied Economics program to apply their coursework in a working environment either via internships for full time students or special projects at their place of employment for part-time students who work full time.
By Arrangement

ADCY 620001  International Cybersecurity
Course provides an in depth global perspective of international networking and communication, including foreign government and industrial espionage, global economies, international privacy and liability laws, sovereign threats, non-US government agencies, international security standards, cybercrime, cyber terrorism, cyber warfare, and import/export requirements. Course also examines the requirements for data location, international policing, and the role of Global Security Operating Centers (GSOCs) in monitoring and responding to international security events.
May 17–Aug 2, W, 6:00–9:15 p.m.
Nathan Kearns


ADCY 6900​01  Ethical Issues in Cybersecurity & the Ignatian Paradigm
Course provides “real life” complex, ethical situations for students to evaluate, as both decision-maker and advisor, by addressing the various issues confronted by senior government and corporate professionals, nation states, and other parties of significance, involving the receipt and protection of critical and sensitive data. Specific topics include standard professional ethical frameworks of beneficence and non-maleficence; rights and justice; and issues related to privacy, intellectual property, and corporate espionage and fraud, while contrasting same with freedom of information and intellectual creativity. The course compares and contrasts global governments’ and cultures’ differing approaches to ethics, and enhances, from a framework of dialogue, discernment of action, and deliberation, the ability of students to make reasoned and responsible business decisions in a global economy. The course also examines aspirational versus mandatory ethical standards (i.e., the “right thing to do” vs. what is “legal” or “compliant”), through additional frameworks of reference, including review, reflection, and refinement of decisions.
May 22–July 31, M, 6:00–9:15 p.m.
Kevin Powers



ADGR 770301  Research Methods and Data Analysis
* This course may be taken by non-degree students.*
ADGR770301 Syllabus
This course introduces students to basic social science research methods. The primary objective is for students to learn to read and evaluate research as well as create contributions to their chosen profession or field of research. By the end of the course, students will be more knowledgeable of basic research design and statistical methods. Additionally, students will better understand how to use research findings to improve and enhance their professional roles.  
NOTE: This course is required for all students who entered the MS Administrative Studies program AFTER June 1st, 2014. Please see an academic advisor to ensure appropriate placement in course.
May 17–June 21, M W, 6:00–9:15 p.m.
Susan Bradle
y

ADGR 770401  Accounting and Financial Analysis I
ADGR770401 Syllabus
Financial statements, fundamental accounting concepts, procedures, terminology and contemporary financial reporting are introduced using state-of-the-art business software. The course develops a user perspective to accounting to better understand what the numbers say. Explores the accounting cycle, the various statements that are the product of the process and the implications the data carry. Reviews areas where alternative methods of reporting are allowed. Designed for those using, not preparing data. Little or no formal accounting background needed.
May 16–June 22, T TH, 6:00-9:15 p.m.
Jason Williams

ADGR 770801  Project Management
ADGR770801 Syllabus
* This course may be taken by non-degree students.*
This course introduces students to the basic tenets and components involved in project management. The primary objective is to provide frameworks that make it possible to track and measure project performance, overcome challenges, and adapt to changes in a variety of professional environments. Specific topics covered in the course include project scope, time, cost, quality, human resources, communications, risk and stakeholder management and a variety of other operational issues that emerge during project planning, initiation, monitoring, and execution.
July 10–July 14, M T W TH F, 9:00 a.m-5:00 p.m.
Charles Coakley and Aza Chirkova


ADGR 774101  Persuasive Communication
ADGR774101 Syllabus
In our culture, image is about conveying success. It is what makes us want to buy a brand or vote for a candidate. Course explores the powerful role of imaging, the use of trademarks as a vehicle to convey a corporate image, and how a “marketable personality” (for a product, service, organization or individual) is defined, developed and communicated. Examines strategies for balancing the emotional and rational factors of a message, finding a position with “soul,” and using research to full advantage in relation to image failure and crisis management. A look at how imaging is affected by the exploding world of media and how it influences the corporate bottom line. Video and audio presentations and case studies provide stimulating examples. Students will better understand the imaging process and develop the know-how to evaluate and use it.
June 27–Aug 3, T TH, 6:00–9:15 p.m.
Donald Fishman


ADGR 775301  Employment Law
ADGR775301 Syllabus
This introduction to the rapidly evolving law of the workplace focuses on how the law works in practice today providing important information for employees and managers. Looks at traditional common law such as “Employment At Will” and areas of employment law topics including hiring, promotion and termination, workplace security, privacy and safety, compensation and benefits, immigration, and labor-management relations. The course also covers the various laws prohibiting discrimination in the workplace, with a focus on federal statutes and regulations as well as the emerging legal issues around Social Media in the workplace.
May 16–June 22, T TH, 6:00-9:15 p.m.
Richard Zaiger


ADGR 775501 Human Resources Development   
This is a hybrid course, which combines some in-person and some online class meetings. Please refer to the course syllabus on the Course Information and Schedule page in AGORA for more detailed information.
ADGR775501 Syllabus
This course focuses on employees and how to get the highest level of performance out of employees. What motivates your employees? What makes them want to stay? How do you prevent attrition? This course will start with an introduction to organizational design and relevant organizational development theories. It will then move to talent acquisition and employee training, where use of analytics and metrics will be introduced. Next, students will learn performance management methods and appraisal, including use of instruments and rating scales. The course will then move to career development and leadership development including assessing talent, developing career paths, and succession planning. The course will conclude by helping students understand the differences between coaching and mentoring, and how to effectively manage organizational talent.
A hybrid course utilizing required classroom attendance on specific dates (TBA). The other dates will require monitoring and posting to the virtual classroom on Canvas 2-3 times a week and to submit work and engage in on-line discussion.
May 17–June 21, M W, 6:00–9:15 p.m.
Heather Williams

ADGR 777701  Evolution of Marketing Strategies in the Digital Era
This is a hybrid course, which combines some in-person and some online class meetings. The Tuesday class sessions will be conducted in person, and the Thursday class sessions will meet ONLINE. Please refer to the course syllabus on the Course Information and Schedule page in AGORA for more detailed information.
ADGR777701 Syllabus
practical overview of the role and potential of marketing. Developing a market strategy to reach new and evolving markets depends on understanding emerging communication activities and styles, the accurate identification of needs, and expertise in generating and converting inquiries. Elements of a marketing strategy, including pricing, promotion, product decisions, and distribution are included. Creative development of the marketing mix utilizing traditional and interactive components. Strategy formulation and control of the marketing function in a digital world are emphasized.
June 27–Aug 3, T TH, 6:00–9:15 p.m.
Patricia Clarke


ADGR 778501  Leadership & Decision Making: Ignatian-Based Applied Ethics
This is a hybrid course, which combines some in-person and some online class meetings. Please refer to the course syllabus on the Course Information and Schedule page in AGORA for more detailed information.
ADGR778501 Syllabus
What role can ethics and morals play in influencing leaders? Too often, decisions are made based solely on numbers or shareholder value, and without reflection. Any collateral damage is then justified as being just the "cost of doing business." We have an obligation to each other and to ourselves to personally engage and make decisions in a moral context. Using Ignatian discernment and values as a guide, this course will explore strategies and options for integrating values into leadership decision-making. Applying those strategies to real world case studies, we will develop tools to help navigate those situations where there is pressure to compromise values or disengage from our moral compass.
May 17–June 21, M W, 6:00–9:15 p.m.
James Burns, I.V.D.


ADGR 801501  Business Strategy
ADGR801501 Syllabus
Strategy is how leaders distinguish the organizations advantage in competitive markets. It is a set of guidelines that help direct decision making and the allocation of resources to accomplish the company’s key business goals and objectives. To succeed in the future, leaders must develop the means and capabilities needed to gain and sustain these advantages. This course introduces the concepts of strategic management by using readings, discussion and case studies.  The key components the course will cover are: the three horizons of strategy; external environments (social, political, technological and economic); global markets; internal Factors and Implications (capabilities, talent, resources); the role of Culture and Change Management.
June 26–Aug 2 M W, 6:00–9:15 p.m.
Jenny Gumm
ONLINE COURSE - MEETS ONLINE ON MONDAYS AND WEDNESDAYS
FULLY ONLINE COURSE - Synchronous - Day and time are specific; students must participate weekly per all communications and instructions from the professor, must adhere to course schedule, and submit all course work on time.


ADGR 812001  Marketing Analytics
This is a hybrid course, which combines some in-person and some online class meetings. Please refer to the course syllabus on the Course Information and Schedule page in AGORA and on the Summer Session website for more detailed information.
ADGR812001 Syllabus
As industries become increasingly competitive, companies rely more and more on marketing to attract buyers and prove the value of their spend from brand awareness to impact on revenues. Doing so in today’s digital world requires a clear understanding and management of metrics and analytics. The Internet promises to revolutionize the dynamics of international commerce and permits new types of measurement tools that will expand the data available to marketers, including advertising measurement and customer profiling. This course will provide students with the main tools to lead marketing performance and help them answer key questions such as: How can I lead marketing performance by designing the appropriate metrics? What are the most important marketing metrics and analytics for me to use? How can I measure my various marketing programs’ impact on revenue and profit? How can I best communicate marketing results with my executive team and board?
June 26–Aug 2 M W, 6:00–9:15 p.m.
Letizia Affinito


ADGR 9902  Applied Research Project
The Applied Research Project for Leadership & Administration is designed to give students the opportunity to apply the knowledge they have acquired throughout their graduate program to real-world situations. The culmination of such knowledge will be directed at a final presentation and major paper. Also, the learning objectives of their particular MS specialization will be encapsulated through their in-depth, individualized research. An applied research project is meant to be a cumulative experience. As such this course provides opportunities for students to integrate knowledge from their core and concentration courses, to gain insight into the meaning of professionalism and professional practice, and to produce a research project that can be utilized in their current work setting to showcase their skills and talents. Alternatively it can also be used to highlight their background to prospective employers or in fields in which they have an interest but may not be currently employed.
ADGR 9902 01 May 17–Aug 2, Wednesday 4:30–6:00 p.m.
Elisabeth Hiles
ADGR 9902 02 May 22–July 31, Monday 4:30–6:00 p.m.
This is a hybrid section, which combines some in-person and some online class meetings. Please refer to the course syllabus on the Course Information and Schedule page in AGORA and on the Summer Session website for more detailed information.
David Goodman