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Welcome from the deans

Dean Andy Boynton

Welcome from Andy Boynton
Dean
Carroll School of Management

Welcome from Dean Boynton

Boston College is committed to shaping life-long learning leaders who can discover innovative and ethical solutions to emerging and changing business conditions. We believe that education is not a destination, but should be a lifetime journey that requires a commitment to new skills and attitudes. Our motto of “Ever to Excel” captures the spirit of this exciting adventure into learning and personal development.

At the Carroll School, we embrace this educational challenge with a passion. I know this because I experienced it firsthand as a Carroll School student. I am honored and proud to be at my alma mater and to work with our faculty and staff, helping our students embark on their own journeys. Please explore our web site—a virtual portrait of our world. Then, come and visit this thriving authentic place. I welcome your questions and comments and would like to hear from you.

Andy Boynton
Dean
Carroll School of Management

 

Associate Dean Richard Keeley

Welcome from Richard Keeley
Associate Dean for Undergraduate Studies
Carroll School of Management

Welcome From Dean Keeley

In the early part of the twentieth century, the eminent philosopher of science, Alfred North Whitehead, made what seems a curious remark about the profession of university teaching: “It should be the chief aim of a university professor to exhibit himself [sic: it was early in the twentieth century!] in his own true character--that is, as an ignorant man thinking, actively utilizing his small share of knowledge. In a sense, knowledge shrinks as wisdom grows: for details are swallowed up in principles.” The wiser one becomes, Whitehead suggests, the less one “knows.”

It is my hope that your undergraduate study at the Carroll School of Management fosters growth in both knowledge and wisdom. There's much to learn about the workings of markets and firms, the intersection of technology and business design, the valuation of stocks and the creation of products. But cultivate wisdom, too, as you study the liberal arts and learn, along with Whitehead and Socrates, the very real limits of what we all know.

Richard Keeley
Associate Dean for Undergraduate Studies
Carroll School of Management