School of Theology and Ministry Courses

TM 351 Faith Elements in Conflicts (Spring: 03)

Cross Listed with TH 351
Open to STM, GA&S and Advanced Undergrad Theology major students.
Religious differences often appear to figure into the dehumanization of enemies and rationalization of violence. This course will look at the way key concepts such as revelation, election, and universality in various religions, especially in sectarian guise, affect the origins and progress of violent conflicts and will ask to what extent such employment of these concepts betrays the religions themselves. It will also examine how far institutional interests of religious bodies make them vulnerable to manipulation by other parties engaged in any given conflict and how the religious elements and loyalties relate to other interests that figure into such conflicts.
Raymond Helmick, S.J.

Last Updated: 28-NOV-11

TM 414 Contemporary Approaches to Religious Education (Spring: 3)

Cross Listed with TH414, ED414
Offered Periodically
The task of forming a people of faith is the challenge each generation must embrace. This course examines various approaches to faith formation for their applicability to contemporary settings. Attention is given to both the theoretical framework and the pastoral expression of the work of religious education.
Jane Regan

Last Updated: 15-FEB-13

TM 425 Topics in Catholic Education (Fall: 3)

This course explores the history, purpose, current status, and possible futures of Catholic elementary and secondary schools. Students will become conversant with the body of scholarly literature, theoretical and empirical, that defines the field of Catholic education. Though the primary focus will be on Catholic schools in the United States, the course will explore how we can learn from the experience of other religiously affiliated schools here and abroad, and from the experience of Catholic educators worldwide. Special attention will be devoted to how the Ignatian spirituality and pedagogy can be a resource for educators in Jesuit and non-Jesuit schools.
Joseph O'Keefe, S.J.

Last Updated: 25-FEB-13

TM 438 Career and Calling (Fall: 03)

Cross Listed with TH438
How can people combine their sense of calling with their pursuit of work and career? Both corporations and spiritual writers have converged on the topic of "workplace spirituality". The Academy of Management, a leading forum for business schools, now includes a section on management and spirituality. Catholic and Protestant thinkers--including Jesuit experts on spiritual discernment--also seek to integrate career development and Christian spiritual practices. This multi-disciplinary seminar will read psychologists, theologians, sociologists, and developmental theorists to guide case studies of individuals' careers. Course includes personal discernment exercises. Suitable for ministry students & undergrads.
James Weiss

Last Updated: 28-AUG-13

TM 448 Buddhist Thought & Practice (Fall: 3)

Cross Listed with TH548, PL448
A study of early Buddhism, Southeast Asian Buddhism, Zen, and Pure Land traditions of East Asia, with focus on ways that Buddhist philosophy informs and is informed by practices of meditation, mindfulness, inquiry, ethical training, and ritual. Students will be instructed in mindfulness exercises (observation of states of mind) to inform our studies, with daily mindfulness practice required. Relevance of Buddhist philosophy today, and in relation to Western philosophy and religion, will be considered throughout. Weekly writing, midterm, final papers.
John Makransky

Last Updated: 05-FEB-13

TM 449 Jewish & Christian Approaches to Bible (Fall: 3)

Cross Listed with TH437
Although Jews and Christians share many scriptural texts (the Christian "Old Testament," the Jewish Tanakh), they often understand them differently. This course explores the ways that Jews and Christians have interpreted key texts, separately and together, over two millennia of learning from and disputing with each other. Students will themselves engage in interreligious learning while learning about ancient Israel's scriptures and studying methods of biblical interpretation from late antiquity to today.
Ruth Langer and David Vanderhooft

Last Updated: 01-MAR-13

TM 452 Contextual Theologies:Faith, Praxis,and Culture in Dialogue (Spring: 3)

Offered Periodically
For the past half century theological reflection has been uniquely enriched by the particular contributions of U.S. Hispanic, Asian-American, and African-American Catholic theologians. Their voices successfully address major traditional questions that have driven Christian theological thought (e.g., God, Jesus, Church) in light of their particular socio-cultural circumstances and the lived experience of their communities. This course introduces students to an intercultural conversation among scholars from these three groups (who together constitute the majority of Catholics in the U.S.) on key theological questions while envisioning practical implications of their theologies for the life of the Church and its educating in faith.
Hosffman Ospino

Last Updated: 16-JUL-12

TM 472 Buddhist Ethics:Ancient and Contemporary (Spring: 3)


John Makransky

Last Updated: 06-JUL-12

TM 480.01 Ecclesiology (Summer 2013: 2)

The course provides an introductory survey of issues in the field of ecclesiology through a reading of classic texts in the field. The careful reading and discussion of these texts is central to the course. We begin with texts, which, while not themselves specifically ecclesiological, became loci communes once the field developed. We then turn to the study of ecclesiology proper, that is, ecclesiology as a field within systematic or doctrinal theology.
Michael Himes

Last Updated: 05-FEB-13

TM 485 From Diatribe to Dialogue: Studies in the Jewish-Christian Encounter (Spring: 3)


Ruth Langer and Charles Gallagher

Last Updated: 16-JUL-12

TM 496.01 The Moral Dimension of the Christian Life (Summer 2013: 2)

This course provides a foundational and systematic overview of the basic components of Catholic moral theology. The content of the course is an exposition and analysis of topics traditionally treated under the heading of fundamental moral theology: moral character, moral freedom and its limits, the relationship of spirituality and morality, sin and conversion, conscience, the use of scripture in moral reasoning, natural law, the teaching authority of the church in moral matters, the development of moral norms, discernment and moral decision-making.
Kenneth Himes, OFM

Last Updated: 06-FEB-13

TM 501 Theological Synthesis (Spring: 3)

Enrollment limited. Qualified students in other programs may enroll as space allows.
This is the second semester of the required, six-credit course for M.Div. students in their second year of residency. The course combines reading, lectures, written reports, and discussion groups on the following topics: the church;a broad examination that includes sacramentality and ministry; Christian moral life;and creation and eschatology. Students conclude the course by writing a short synthesis of the faith in collaboration with a faculty mentor; this paper serves as the basis of a one-hour oral examination by members of the faculty.
Orfilio Valiente

Last Updated: 15-FEB-13

TM 502 Synoptic Gospels (Spring: 3)

Offered Periodically
A study of the Gospels of Mark, Matthew, and Luke. Following an examination of the "synoptic problem," the course offers an extended analysis of Mark's Gospel and then proceeds to examine how Matthew and Luke produced "second edition" Gospels to serve the needs of the communities to whom they wrote. Particular attention is paid to theological and pastoral issues raised by the texts.
Thomas Stegman, S.J.

Last Updated: 15-FEB-13

TM 503 Grief and Loss (Fall: 3)

School of Theology and Ministry course
Grief may be understood as the response to a significant loss. We will explore pastoral, theological, religious, and secular perspectives on grief and loss and seek to integrate these perspectives where appropriate. We'll consider important new research in thanatology and review traditional psychological theories of grief in light of contemporary critiques. We will explore the experience of grief in light of context and culture and consider which features may be universal. We will attend to often unrecognized dimensions of grief—disenfranchised grief and the grief born of injustice. We'll focus on how to respond pastorally to grieving individuals and communities.
Melissa Kelley

Last Updated: 05-FEB-13

TM 505 Introduction to Catholic Social Ethics (Fall: 3)

This course introduces the rich tradition of social ethics engaged explicitly by Leo XIII, Rerum novarum (1891), continued by his successors and bishops conferences, and enriched by theological reflection that continues today. Attention will be given to the principal documents (encyclicals, Gaudium et spes (1965), pastoral letters), and the contexts from which they emerged to gain facility in applying social analysis to contemporary concerns. Key themes to be studied: life and dignity of the human person, solidarity, social participation and the common good, the preferential option for the poor, and economic development and work, among others.
Mary Jo Iozzio

Last Updated: 21-MAR-13

TM 506 Fundamental Theology (Fall: 3)

School of Theology and Ministry course
The resources and methods of theology provide the framework for this course. A primary focus will be on the relationship between revelation, faith, and theology, which includes the role of the Bible and the church's doctrine. The course will also survey past and present methods in 'doing theology,' and consider the connection between theology and spirituality.
Khaled Anatolios

Last Updated: 05-FEB-13

TM 506.01 Fundamental Theology (Spring 2013-2014: 3)

School of Theology and Ministry course
The resources and methods of theology provide the framework for this course. The principle topics are: revelation, faith and the human condition, tradition (broadly conceived as the Church¿s living witness to and mediation of the experience of God¿s self-communication in Christ and the Spirit), the world religions and Christ the Savior, and theological methods and styles. The chief text, Rethinking Fundamental Theology by Gerald O'Collins, SJ, will be supplemented by a variety of articles available on Blackboard.
Randy Sachs, S.J.

Last Updated: 14-NOV-13

TM 509 Cross-Cultural Christian Ethics (Spring: 3)

Offered Periodically
This course considers models of fundamental Christian ethics in various parts of the world in order to illustrate convergences and divergences in terms of concerns, methods employed, conclusions reached, as well as prospects for cross-cultural collaboration. Two historical novels set in Africa (Achebe) and Asia (Endo) are read, along with works on cultural anthropology (Douglas), fundamental moral theology (Bretzke), global theological hermeneutics (Schreiter), a methodological reflection on the American moral tradition (Betsworth) and the 1986 movie Mission will be viewed and discussed in the context of Latin America liberation theology. A small group final project is required of all.
James Bretzke, S.J., S.T.D.

Last Updated: 16-JUL-12

TM 510 Fundamental Moral Theology (Fall: 3)

Prerequisite: One undergraduate course either in philosophical ethics or moral theologyPhilosophical Ethics
This Level Two course treats Roman Catholic fundamental moral theology, focusing on both traditional and contemporary understandings of principal themes such as: The Nature and History, as well as a Methodological Model for Approaching Fundamental Moral Theology; The Moral Person and Moral Community; Conscience, Moral Norms and the Natural Law; Evaluations of Moral Acts; Sin (personal and social), Conversion and Reconciliation; Roles of Church Teaching (Magisterium) & Tradition in selected contemporary issues in the areas of sexual ethics, health care and bioethics, Catholics in the political arena will be discussed in terms of applying the fundamental themes of moral theology.
James Bretzke, S.J.

Last Updated: 05-FEB-13

TM 511.01 Jesus the Christ: Who Do You Say I Am? (Summer 2013: 2)

Participants will survey Christological writings from the New Testament to the present with attention to key moments in theological understanding of the person and work of Jesus Christ. Special attention will be given to contemporary Christologies. Participants have the opportunity to explore the ministry of Jesus, the meaning of the cross and resurrection, and the universality of Christ as savior. By the end of the course participants will be able to articulate their Christological framework, its roots in Scripture and Tradition, and how it affects their pastoral perspective.
Barbara Radtke

Last Updated: 11-FEB-13

TM 512 Acts of the Apostles (Spring: 3)

Prerequisite: NT Intro is recommended.
Offered Periodically
An exegetical analysis of Luke's narrative of the birth and growth of the early church and its key theological themes (e.g., God, Jesus, the Holy Spirit, the twelve apostles, Jerusalem, the church, Jews and Christians, the Gentiles, Christology, eschatology, mission, salvation history). The treatment will proceed with particular attention to the Gospel of Luke, the genre and purpose(s) of Luke's second book, and the life setting of the Lukan author and audience.
Christopher Matthews

Last Updated: 15-FEB-13

TM 513 Theological Synthesis (Fall: 3)

Prerequisite: Department permission required.
Qualified students in other programs may enroll as space allows. Students register for TM 501 spring semester.
This is a required six-credit course for M.Div. students in their second year of residency and presumes a background in scripture and historical theology. It is designed to mediate an integrated and holistic understanding of Christian faith in terms of the foundational doctrines. The course combines reading, lectures, written reports, and discussion groups. Students conclude the course by writing a short synthesis of the faith in collaboration with a faculty mentor which serves as the basis of a one-hour oral examination by members of the faculty.
Ernesto Valiente

Last Updated: 05-FEB-13

TM 514 The Psalms: Prayer of Israel, Prayer of Christians (Spring: 3)

Prerequisite: No prerequisites, but TM 515 The Basic Narrative of the Old Testament: Genesis to Kings is highly recommended.
Offered Periodically
From ancient times to the present, the Book of Psalms has held a central role both in expressing and in shaping the faith experience of Jews and Christians. This course investigates the Book of Psalms with some attention to similar literary material from other OT and NT books and from other ancient Near Eastern sources. It will consider issues of genre, poetic features and structure, theological themes, and dramatic logic. The course will also examine how psalms function in Christian spirituality, both in the liturgy (considering the lectionary for Mass and the liturgy of the hours) and in personal prayer.
Michael Simone, S.J.

Last Updated: 03-MAY-13

TM 515 The Core Narrative of the Old Testament: Genesis to Kings (Fall: 3)

This course will meet on Friday from 9-12 plus a one hour section, time to be determined.
A study of the Pentateuch and the Deuteronomistic History (Deuteronomy to Kings) through lectures, and sections in which students present an exegesis of important passages. Solid knowledge of these books is essential to understand the rest of the Bible. This course does not duplicate other "introductions," for we read only Genesis through Kings (not the Prophets, Wisdom Literature, or Psalms), and a third of the class time is devoted to small sections, which are designed to sharpen exegetical and preaching skills.
Richard J. Clifford, S.J.

Last Updated: 21-MAR-13

TM 517 Human Sexuality (Fall: 3)

Level 2 course
The course studies human sexuality in light of the contributions that come from human experience and human sciences, biblical scholarship, theological insights and debates, and the Catholic Magisterium. Personal dimensions (e.g., bodiliness, development, orientation, identity, affectivity), social components (e.g., gender, economic dynamics), and historical shifts will be highlighted. The anthropological, hermeneutic, and phenomenological approaches that will be privileged allow us to discuss behaviors and practices critically and to strengthen and promote virtuous and just relationships.
Andrea Vicini, S.J.

Last Updated: 02-APR-13

TM 527 Liturgical Preaching I (Spring: 3)

Offered Periodically
There will be sections with a limit of six students per section.
This course is an introduction to the art of liturgical preaching. Included will be discussion of the nature, content, and context of the homily with emphasis on developing skills of preparation, composition, and delivery. There will be opportunity for frequent student preaching with the use of videotape for teacher, peer, and self-evaluation.
Thomas Kane, C.S.P.

Last Updated: 06-FEB-13

TM 529 Ministry and Theology of the Sacrament of Reconciliation (Spring: 3)

Prerequisite: One graduate course in fundamental moral theology and one course in canon law (preferably canon law of marriage and sacraments)
Offered Periodically
This course is part of the M.Div. Rites Practicum, and is open to non-ordination students, including women, as long as they have the prerequisites and are aware that the primary focus is on preparation for the ministry of the Sacrament of Reconciliation.
This Level Two course treats the Roman Catholic Sacrament of Reconciliation from its historical, theological, moral, pastoral, liturgical, and canonical perspectives. The course¿s emphasis will be on an ongoing practicum on confessional counseling, utilizing role playing of a variety of confessional cases&issues. The course will also include discussion of moral, liturgical, and systematic theology as it relates to the Sacrament. Additional attention will be paid to spiritual direction and pastoral counseling in the context of sacramental confession, as well as a number of pastoral, moral, and canonical issues which often surface in the celebration of the Rite of Reconciliation.
James T. Bretzke, S.J.

Last Updated: 14-FEB-13

TM 530 Contextual Education (Fall/Spring: 5)

For academic year students, Contextual Education is a four-credit program for the MA Pastoral Ministry degree and a five-credit program for the MA Theology and Ministry degree. It includes a supervised field placement and a classroom component that lasts from September through April. Students register for Contextual Education during the Fall semester of their final year but should contact the Director of Contextual Education in the prior Spring semester to set up a placement.
DEPT

Last Updated: 15-FEB-13

TM 530.03 Contextual Education (Summer 2013: 3)

For Summer Students, Contextual Education is a two credit program. It includes a supervised field placement and a classroom component that begins one summer, ends the following summer, and is conducted online from September through April. Students register for Contextual Education during the summer of their second-to-last summer, but should contact the Director of Contextual Education in the prior spring semester to discuss placement options.
Theresa O'Keefe

Last Updated: 11-MAR-13

TM 531 Rites Practicum (Spring: 1)

WJ Req: Word and Worship: Liturgical Practice
A practicum designed to prepare ordination candidates in the Roman Catholic Church for the ministry of liturgical presidency. Students will meet twice a week (once for theory and once for practice) as well as in small groups and for videotaping.
Thomas Kane, C.S.P.

Last Updated: 16-JUL-12

TM 531.01 Rites Practicum (Fall 2013-2014: 3)

WJ Req: Word and Worship: Liturgical Practice
A practicum designed to prepare ordination candidates in the Roman Catholic Church for the ministry of liturgical presidency. Students will meet in a full group to discuss the theological/liturgical/pastoral background to each rite and then divide into small working groups to practice the individual rite (paying attention to prayer interpretation, gesture and body positioning) with videotape capture for teacher, self and peer evaluation.
Thomas Kane, C.S.P. and Robert VerEecke, S.J.

Last Updated: 06-FEB-13

TM 534 The Church (Fall: 3)

The ecclesial dimension of Christian faith is the focal point of this course. The course will locate the church within both a Trinitarian theology and a theological anthropology. Specific topics for exploration include the place of the church in the Creed, the sacramentality of the church, a theology of mission, and of structure and authority. The course will also explore current issues shaping the church's life and its place in the wider culture.
Margaret Guider, O.S.F.

Last Updated: 05-FEB-13

TM 534.01 The Church (Spring 2012-2013: 3)

School of Theology and Ministry course
The ecclesial dimension of Christian faith is the focal point of this course. The course will locate the church within both a Trinitarian theology and a theological anthropology. Specific topics for exploration include the place of the church in the Creed, the sacramentality of the church, a theology of mission, and of structure and authority. The course will also explore current issues shaping the church's life and its place in the wider culture.
Richard Lennan

Last Updated: 06-JUL-12

TM 534.01 The Church (Spring 2013-2014: 3)

The ecclesial dimension of Christian faith is the focal point of this course. Specific topics for exploration include the identity of the church in the world, the sacramentality of the church, a theology of mission, and of structure and authority. The course will also explore current issues shaping the church's life and its place in a digital age.
Barbara Radtke

Last Updated: 17-JUN-13

TM 537 Spiritual Autobiography: Journeys into the Self and God (Fall: 3)

Offered Periodically
School of Theology and Ministry course
This course examines the spiritual autobiographies of well-known individuals such as Augustine of Hippo, Teresa of Avila, Thérèse of Lisieux, Thomas Merton, Dorothy Day, Walter Ciszek, S.J., and Nancy Mairs. In addition to reading classic texts by profound and influential religious seekers, the class will explore how religious experiences, understandings of the self, God and the supernatural are shaped by diverse historical contexts. Lectures and discussion.
Catherine Mooney

Last Updated: 05-FEB-13

TM 538 Directed Research in Pastoral Ministry (Fall/Spring: 3)


Department

Last Updated: 16-JUL-12

TM 539 Eucharistic Theology (Spring: 3)

WJ Req: Systematics or Word and Worship
This course will reflect on the theology of the Eucharist as it has developed throughout the history of the Church, and will seek a contemporary understanding of traditional doctrines in light of Vatican II and the reformed ritual for the Eucharistic liturgy.
John Baldovin, S.J.

Last Updated: 16-JUL-12

TM 540 Introduction to the New Testament (Fall: 3)

A historical and theological introduction to the New Testament, its various genres, and the methods of its interpretation against the background of early Christian literature.
Daniel Harrington, S.J.

Last Updated: 05-FEB-13

TM 540.01 Introduction to the New Testament (Summer 2013: 2)

A historical and theological introduction to the New Testament, its various genres, and the methods of its interpretation against the background of early Christian literature.
Christopher Matthews

Last Updated: 13-JUN-13

TM 544 Meditation, Service and Social Action (Spring: 3)

WJ Req: Pastoral Studies
Meditations of loving communion and presence are adapted from Tibetan Buddhism for students of all backgrounds and faiths to explore. Contemplative theory, meditation guidance, daily meditation practice and writings of leading social activists mutually inform each other to help students freshly appropriate their own spiritualities as a basis for social service and social action throughout their lives. Contemplative theory is explored through the professor's recent book and through the students' deepening meditation experience. This is brought into conversation with weekly readings in Martin Luther King, Mohandas Gandhi, Thich Nhat Hanh, Michael Himes, Thomas Merton, Ram Dass and other social activists.
John Makransky

Last Updated: 16-JUL-12

TM 546 Christology (Fall: 3)

This course seeks to clarify what it means to confess that Jesus of Nazareth is the Christ, and why this is a significant claim. The course surveys the origins and development of three fundamental approaches to Christology: (1) the historical Jesus, (2) Jesus as Savior, and (3) the divine and human natures of Jesus. The course examines the New Testament, the early councils of the Church, the writings of early and medieval Christian theologians, the dogmatic teachings of the Church and the contributions of contemporary theologians. Two main questions will be addressed: Who is Jesus? How does Jesus save us?
Nancy Pineda-Madrid

Last Updated: 05-FEB-13

TM 546.01 Christology (Spring 2013-2014: 3)

This course undertakes an introductory critical reflection on the confession that Jesus is the Christ and examines its relevance for Christian praxis today. We will consider the New Testament interpretations of Jesus¿ life and ministry and trace the historical development of christological doctrine. We will then consider the intersection between Christology and soteriology¿how does Jesus save us? The course will conclude by looking at contemporary interpretations of Christ through the lens of social and cultural realities (suffering, injustice, historical consciousness, and religious pluralism) that enhance and sometimes challenge our understanding of Jesus Christ.
Orfilio Valiente

Last Updated: 14-FEB-13

TM 547 Apocalyptic Literature (Spring: 3)

After treating some general questions concerning apocalyptic, the course will focus on pertinent texts, especially the books of Daniel and Revelation.
Daniel Harrington, S.J.

Last Updated: 16-JUL-12

TM 550 History of Western Christianity I: 100-850 (Fall: 3)

Through lectures and primary source readings, the course surveys the major cultural, institutional, and theological developments of ancient Christianity from the time of the persecutions to the break-up of the Carolingian empire and the rise of medieval Christendom.
Francine Cardman

Last Updated: 05-FEB-13

TM 551 History of Western Christianity II: 850-1650 (Spring: 3)

Students need not have taken TM 550 or any other course in church history.
General survey of Western Christianity, with special emphasis on institutional, theological, pastoral and spiritual issues. Lays the foundation for understanding many features of the Church today. Topics include monasticism, establishment of the modern papacy, lay apostolic movements (e.g. beguines), religious orders (e.g. Franciscans, Jesuits), heresies, crusades, inquisitions, scholasticism, saints (e.g. Hildegard of Bingen, Francis of Assisi, Ignatius of Loyola), popular devotions, women in church, mysticism, Protestant Reformation, church councils (e.g. Trent), overseas evangelization. Lectures, readings in primary sources, focused discussion. Level 1 course.
Catherine M. Mooney

Last Updated: 13-FEB-13

TM 553 Foundations in Prison Ministry (Spring: 3)

This course is open to advanced undergraduate students.
Dostoevsky wrote: "The degree of civilization in a society can be judged by entering its prisons." Today, with nearly two million men and women in American prisons, we lead the world in incarcerating our citizens. This course will introduce students to the specialized skills needed for effective prison ministry. It will combine classroom study with in-prison ministerial experience and theological reflection. The goal is to form future jail and prison ministers for leadership and advocacy for a more humane approach to criminal justice.
Brad Brockmann

Last Updated: 14-JAN-13

TM 553.01 Foundations in Prison Ministry (Spring 2012-2013: 3)

School of Theology and Ministry course
Dostoevsky wrote: "The degree of civilization in a society can be judged by entering its prisons." Today, with nearly two million men and women in American prisons, we lead the world in incarcerating our citizens. This course will introduce students to the specialized skills needed for effective prison ministry. It will combine classroom study with in-prison ministerial experience and theological reflection. The goal is to form future jail and prison ministers for leadership and advocacy for a more humane approach to criminal justice.
Brad Brockmann

Last Updated: 23-APR-12

TM 560 Critical Contemporary Ethical Issues (Spring: 3)

Offered Periodically
This is the introductory course in moral theology for all degree programs, except the M.Div.
This course considers critical contemporary issues from Catholic, interdenominational, interfaith, international, and cross-cultural perspectives. Attention will be given to the Wesleyan Quadrilateral (scripture, tradition, reason, and experience) and casuistry to ground a common approach in the examination and interrogation of the issues to be addressed. The principal ethical issues to be studied include: economic justice (access to health and human services), sexual ethics (just love, sexual identity, misogyny, pedophilia, and reproduction), respect life (abortion, euthanasia, hyper-incarceration and capital punishment), fanaticism and religious fundamentalism, environmental degradation and human ecology (¿natural¿ disasters), and the toll of a perpetual state of war.
Mary Jo Iozzio

Last Updated: 17-JUN-13

TM 568 Pastoral Care of the Aged, the Demented and Their Caregivers (Spring: 3)

Offered Periodically
The course will include lectures, seminar readings and discussion, several short reflection papers (all participants) and a 15-20 page research paper (credit only) on a mutually agreed upon topic. School of Theology and Ministry course
With the increasing population of aged there is a critical need for priests, chaplains, and others with knowledge of the complex bio-psychosocial, spiritual and pastoral needs of the elderly and those who care for them. The course will begin with a survey of the biological and psychological changes of normal aging and the more common forms of pathology of aging, particularly the dementing illnesses. Other topics will include scriptural and theological dimensions of aging, separation, grief and loss, and ethical dimensions of aging.
John Siberski, S.J., M.D.

Last Updated: 29-AUG-12

TM 569 The Crisis in Confidence in the Catholic Church (Spring: 03)

Cross Listed with TH 519
Open to STM, GA&S, and Advanced Undergraduate Theology major students
The Catholic Church, in the United States and Europe, has seen declining numbers both in regular church attendance and in clergy and religious life. Scandals have torn people's allegiance, and feelings of disappointment, disillusion, and anger have become widespread. Church authorities have seemed reluctant to acknowledge or address these problems and have responded with vexation to those who raise them, whether from Right or Left. This course will examine the roots of this crisis of confidence in light of the nature of the Church community, its institutional structure ,and the historical experiences that have brought it to this pass.
Raymond Helmick, S.J.

Last Updated: 28-NOV-11

TM 572 Intermediate Hebrew Readings (Fall/Spring: 3)

Prerequisite: Basic Hebrew
School of Theology and Ministry course
A two-semester course of readings from the Hebrew Bible.
Richard Clifford, S.J.

Last Updated: 15-FEB-13

TM 573 Intermediate Greek (Fall/Spring: 3)

Prerequisite: A minimum of one year of basic Greek.
A two-semester course of readings from the New Testament and the Septuagint. Three credits will be awarded in the second semester.
Daniel J. Harrington, S.J. and Thomas Stegman, S.J.

Last Updated: 28-OCT-13

TM 577 Comparative Theology/Theology of Religions (Fall: 3)

Cross Listed with TH507
This seminar will focus on the various theological positions which have been developed with regard to the reality of religious pluralism as well as on the relationship between theology of religions and comparative theology. While we will focus mainly on the works of Christian theologians, we will also pay attention to analogous developments in other religious traditions.

Catherine Cornille

Last Updated: 05-FEB-13

TM 586 Tibetan Buddhist Philosophy&Practice (Spring: 3)


Last Updated: 28-AUG-13

TM 595 Professional Ethics for Ministry I (Fall: 0)

This is the first of a two-part workshop series. This intensive workshop offers participants an opportunity to reflect theologically and pastorally on professional ethics in ministry. Through varied modalities, participants will consider a broad spectrum of ministerial activities and the correlative ethical responsibilities of the minister. Students register for one of the following dates: September 27th or October 4th. It meets from 12:00 - 4:00 p.m.
Melissa Kelley

Last Updated: 28-AUG-13

TM 596 Professional Ethics for Ministry II (Spring: 0)

This is the second part of the Professional Ethics for Ministry workshop. This intensive workshop offers participants an opportunity to reflect theologically and pastorally on professional ethics in ministry. Through varied modalities, participants will consider a broad spectrum of ministerial activities and the correlative ethical responsibilities of the minister. Students register for one of the following dates: March 21 and April 11. It meets from 12:00 - 4:00 p.m.
Melissa Kelley

Last Updated: 28-AUG-13

TM 603 Classic Texts of American Theology (Fall: 3)

Offered Periodically
School of Theology and Ministry course
A seminar focused on the classic texts, and secondary works, produced in and about religion in the United States: William James' Varieties of Religious Experience, H. Richard Niebuhr's Christ and Culture; and George Marsden's Fundamentalism and American Culture.
Mark Massa, S.J.

Last Updated: 05-FEB-13

TM 603.01 Classic Texts of American Theology (Spring 2013-2014: 3)

A seminar focused on the classic texts, and secondary works, produced in and about religion in the United States: William James' Varieties of Religious Experience, H. Richard Niebuhr's Christ and Culture; and George Marsden's Fundamentalism and American Culture.
Mark Massa, S.J.

Last Updated: 25-FEB-13

TM 604.01 Evangelizing a New Generation: Ministry with Youth and Yound Adults (Summer 2013: 2)

When religious belief and practice are so unfamiliar with many young adults and youth, questions of how to reach and speak to that population become more pressing. This course aims to explore social and developmental elements critical to the effective practice of ministry for and with youth and young adults. Together the class explores the contexts of the ministry (ecclesial and social) with youth and young adults, conceives discipleship as a goal of ministry with these populations, and suggests mentoring communities as a ministerial framework with youth and young adults ¿ constructed appropriately within different settings.
Theresa O'Keefe

Last Updated: 07-FEB-13

TM 607 Gospel of Luke (Fall: 3)

Prerequisite: TM 540 or equivalent
This course aims to develop the student's ability to use the Gospel of Luke more precisely in relation to its Synoptic counterparts and to integrate the Lukan perspective meaningfully into preaching, teaching, and personal reflection. This goal will be pursued through a survey of the structure, content, and main themes of the Third Gospel, based primarily upon exegetical and narrative analysis of the text with attention to current discussion in the scholarly literature.
Christopher Matthews

Last Updated: 05-FEB-13

TM 611 Pathways to God: Classic Texts on Prayer & Christian Mysticism (Spring: 3)

Prerequisite: A previous church history or historical theology course is desirable but not required.
This course explores the theological and pastoral dimensions of both classic texts and contemporary theological reflections on prayer and Christian mysticism. Texts are paired with specific topics, e.g. Benedict of Nursia (lectio divina); Francis of Assisi and Teilhard de Chardin (encountering God in the cosmos); Cloud of Unknowing (centering prayer), Ignatius of Loyola (discernment, consolations, desolations); Teresa of Avila (mystical phenomena); John of the Cross (dark night). Other topics include the Church¿s public prayer, icons, embodied and performative prayer, the possibility of everyday mysticism, the relationship between prayer/mysticism and social justice. Theological reflections by, e.g. McGinn, Rahner, Ruffing, Boff.
Catherine Mooney

Last Updated: 15-NOV-13

TM 612 The Apostle Paul (Spring: 3)

School of Theology and Ministry course
A study of Paul's life, an investigation of all thirteen letters attributed to him, and an examination of the key theological themes of these letters.
Thomas Stegman, S.J.

Last Updated: 05-FEB-13

TM 612.01 The Apostle Paul (Fall 2013-2014: 3)

School of Theology and Ministry course
A study of Paul's life, an investigation of all thirteen letters attributed to him, and an examination of the key theological themes of these letters.
Thomas Stegman, S.J.

Last Updated: 05-FEB-13

TM 618 Theology of the Spiritual Exercises of Ignatius Loyola (Spring: 3)

Prerequisite: Familiarity with Spiritual Exercises.
The theology underlying the Exercises is both familiar and foreign to us today. This advanced seminar brings it into dialog with contemporary theological interpretations of key topics such as: the will of God, vocation, prayer and discernment, divine and human action, grace and human freedom. Intended for advanced students with a basic familiarity of the Spiritual Exercises. Authors include Michael Ivens, William Barry, Karl Rahner, John Macmurray, Roger Haight and William Lynch.
Randy Sachs, S.J.

Last Updated: 15-FEB-13

TM 620.01 Keys to the Council:Vatican II and the Church Today (Summer 2013: 2)

The Second Vatican Council was arguably the most significant ecclesial event for Roman Catholicism in the last four centuries. Although ¿Vatican II¿ has become a staple of contemporary church lingo, few who invoke it (including many bishops and theologians!) seem to have really grasped what happened at that council and what its consequences are for the life of the church today. This course will study the Second Vatican Council as both a seminal ecclesial event and as a source for a revitalized vision of the church for the third millennium. Special attention will be given to the council¿s four constitutions.
Richard Gaillardetz

Last Updated: 07-FEB-13

TM 624 Ignatian Spirituality: Foundations & Traditions (Spring: 3)

“Ignatian spirituality” takes its name from Saint Ignatius of Loyola, founder of the Society of Jesus (Jesuits). This course surveys the origins and traditions of Ignatian spirituality beginning with an exploration of foundational works by Ignatius, including the Spiritual Exercises, his Autobiography, Spiritual Diary, and selected Letters. We then examine the traditions, principles, and diverse applications of Ignatian spirituality as they are expressed in the lives and writings of Jesuits and other men and women (e.g. Francis Xavier, Mary Ward, Gerard Manley Hopkins, Pedro Arrupe, Dean Brackley, Margaret Silf).
Catherine M. Mooney

Last Updated: 17-JUL-12

TM 629 MTS Reflection Paper (Fall/Spring: 0)


DEPT

Last Updated: 13-FEB-13

TM 630 Gospel of Mark (Spring: 3)

A close exegetical analysis of Mark's Gospel, with particular attention to Markan literary devices and to his portrayal of Jesus Christ, discipleship, and suffering.
Thomas Stegman, S.J.

Last Updated: 17-JUL-12

TM 633 African Business (Spring: 3)

Introduction to the exciting current state of business, politics, and social interactions in Africa. For the first time since wide-spread African political independence more than one half century ago, economic independence is beginning to assert itself on the continent. The purpose of this course will be to trace the progress being made throughout Africa for it to take its place among world-wide, self sufficient economies with sophisticated infrastructure, innovative industries, stable political systems, and a developing export sector.
Frank J. Parker, S.J.

Last Updated: 02-NOV-11

TM 634 Spiritual Sources of Catholic Education and Catechesis (Spring: 3)

The course is open to Catholic school teachers and administrators, religious educators, and anyone interested in learning more about the spiritual roots of Catholic education.
Catholic education and catechesis are rooted in particular appropriations of the Christian faith articulated as schools of spirituality. From these appropriations emerge commitments to specific charisms and pedagogical practices. It is imperative that Catholic educational efforts continue to affirm the spiritual legacies that have sustained schools, missions, and parochial programs throughout history. In this course we read some foundational texts of major schools of spirituality and explore how they have inspired life-giving philosophies of Catholic education. The guiding principle throughout the course is that a good philosophy of Catholic education and catechesis is always sustained by a deep spirituality.
Hosffman Ospino

Last Updated: 08-FEB-12

TM 636 Introduction to Liturgy (Fall: 3)

To introduce the basics of liturgical theology, the course is divided into three parts: liturgical history and sources; ritual studies including art, music and environment; and liturgical practice, planning and celebration.
Thomas Kane, C.S.P.

Last Updated: 06-FEB-13

TM 637 Classics of Christian Spirituality: 100-1200 (Spring: 3)

Through careful and critical reading of representative texts from the period, the course will explore the variety of images, ideals, and ways of Christian living that emerged in the changing historical circumstances of the second through the twelfth centuries (e.g., martyrdom, asceticism, pilgrimage, lives of holy women and men, monasticism, mystical and ascetical theology). There will be introductory lectures on texts, authors, and contexts, but class sessions will center on focused discussion of the primary readings. Students are responsible for further background reading as needed for informed participation.
Francine Cardman

Last Updated: 15-FEB-13

TM 638 Seminar: Global Catholicism in the Twenty-First Century (Fall: 3)

This seminar traces the evolution of global Catholicism in the light of demographic shifts within the Roman Catholic Church from 1910-2010. Drawing upon insights and perspectives from church history, ecclesiology, theology, world mission studies, and post-colonial theory, the seminar examines the interactive dynamics of faith and culture as it explores the transformation of Roman Catholic ecclesial consciousness in the twenty-first century. Additional resources for research and analysis include the working documents, proceedings, and outcomes of recent Special Synods as well as international, regional, and national General Conferences of Episcopal Conferences, Assemblies of Conferences of Religious, and World Youth Days.
Margaret Guider, O.S.F.

Last Updated: 05-FEB-13

TM 644 Theological Foundations in Practical Perspective (Fall: 3)

School of Theology and Ministry course
A graduate-level introduction, this course offers an overview of contemporary Christian theology, introducing basic theological themes reflected in Co-Workers in the Vineyard of the Lord, e.g. the cultural context in which we do theology, God, being human, Jesus, reign of God, Church. It provides a consideration of theological methods and an investigation of the sources that contribute to the constructions of theological positions. The course is designed to explore foundational theological concepts from a pastoral perspective.
Colleen Griffith

Last Updated: 14-FEB-13

TM 644.01 Theological Foundations in Practical Perspective (Summer 2013: 2)

This course serves as an introduction to Christian theology, its foundational issues and enduring questions. The course will give each student the opportunity to consider how theological discourse reflects and enriches the faith experience of Christian believers, and to consider some of the diverse ways in which the experience of Christian faith has been understood. It will briefly survey several enduring theological themes (i.e., God and Trinity, Creation, Theological Anthropology, Christology, Church, etc.). It will attend to the methodological choices made by theologians in their constructive endeavors. The course explores these concepts from a pastoral perspective.
Nancy Pineda-Madrid

Last Updated: 05-FEB-13

TM 644.01 Theological Foundations in Practical Perspective (Spring 2013-2014: 3)

A graduate-level introduction, this course offers an overview of contemporary Christian theology, introducing basic theological themes reflected in Co-Workers in the Vineyard of the Lord, e.g. the cultural context in which we do theology, God, being human, Jesus, reign of God, Church. It provides a consideration of theological methods and an investigation of the sources that contribute to the constructions of theological positions. The course is designed to explore foundational theological concepts from a pastoral perspective.
Nancy Pineda-Madrid

Last Updated: 14-FEB-13

TM 646 Ecclesial Ministry (Spring: 3)

This course explores the theology, history, and spirituality of ministry in the church. The emphasis will be on the ecclesial foundations for ministry and the relationship between ministry and the mission of all the baptized. The course will examine current issues in the theology and practice of ministry as well as the implications of ministry for the faith and practice of the minister.
Margaret Guider, O.S.F.

Last Updated: 14-FEB-13

TM 647 Sacraments in the Life of the Church (Spring: 3)

This course will assist participants in developing the sacramental dimension of their pastoral perspective. After exploring sacrament in its broadest sense and other fundamental elements of Roman Catholic sacramental theology, we will examine each sacrament both in its role in the life of the church as well as its role in each individual's faith journey. We will address historical background and contemporary issues about the Sacraments of Initiation - Baptism, Confirmation, and Eucharist; the Sacraments of Healing - Reconciliation and the Sacrament of the Sick; and Sacraments of Vocation; Marriage and Holy Orders.
Barbara Radtke

Last Updated: 05-FEB-13

TM 647.01 Sacraments in the Life of the Church (Summer 2013: 2)

Following a brief review of the catholic principle of sacramentality and liturgical anamnesis, the course will consider each of the seven sacraments as witness and proclamation of God¿s saving work for us in Jesus Christ and in the power of the Spirit. As liturgy is the work of God and the work of the Church, we will also consider the sacraments as the Church¿s act of keeping memory of God¿s saving work in Christ and explore the implications for Christian life for those who celebrate the sacraments.
Catherine Vincie, R.S.H.M.

Last Updated: 06-FEB-13

TM 647.01 Sacraments in the Life of the Church (Fall 2013-2014: 3)

School of Theology and Ministry course
This course will assist participants in developing the sacramental dimension of their pastoral perspective. After exploring sacrament in its broadest sense and other fundamental elements of Roman Catholic sacramental theology, we will examine each sacrament both in its role in the life of the church as well as its role in each individual's faith journey. We will address historical background and contemporary issues about the Sacraments of Initiation - Baptism, Confirmation, and Eucharist; the Sacraments of Healing - Reconciliation and the Sacrament of the Sick; and Sacraments of Vocation; Marriage and Holy Orders.
Barbara Radtke

Last Updated: 05-FEB-13

TM 649 The Environment and Sustainability (Spring: 3)

Cross Listed with MJ647
There is widespread consensus that Planet Earth cannot easily support many of the demands upon its resources and structures being imposed upon it by the present population of the world. This state of disequilibrium promises to become even worse as population totals rise significantly in most countries. The emphasis in this course will be upon methods used for preserving and improving sustainability within the U.S. and worldwide. Fundamentals of Environmental Law, International Law, and Administrative Law will be stressed. Cost estimates will be examined closely. Among subject matters to be studied are oil, water, wind, air, and carbon sequestration.
Frank J. Parker, S.J.

Last Updated: 17-JUL-12

TM 653 Nonprofits and Their Real Estate (Spring: 3)

Cross Listed with MJ 651
Attendance is mandatory unless absence is excused in advance.
This course will examine the astonishing multiplication of nonprofit corporations throughout the American economy. Attention also will be paid to the similar rise in governmental entities: federal, state, and local. Among nonprofit and governmental subject areas to be studied are structures, goals, taxation, compensation, and interaction with the private sector. Heavy emphasis will be placed upon real estate needs and opportunities for expansion, contraction, and reconfiguration. Economy sectors to be examined will include higher education, secondary education, churches, health care delivery, and social service agencies.
Frank J. Parker, S.J.

Last Updated: 02-NOV-11

TM 654 The Canon Law of Marriage and the Sacraments (Fall: 3)

Offered Periodically
A study of the canonical norms governing marriage and the sacraments of initiation and healing in the Catholic Church. Special attention is given to the prenuptial preparation of couples for marriage and to the various grounds of nullity for failed marriages. Treatment of marriage and the other sacraments is directed to priests, deacons, and lay persons who administer and assist at them, and to those who prepare the faithful for their valid, lawful, and fruitful reception. Consideration is given to the theological basis of the law and its appropriate pastoral application.
James J. Conn, S.J.

Last Updated: 29-MAY-13

TM 658 The Theological Virtues (Spring: 3)

Offered Periodically
The Church is often described as a community of faith, hope, and love. This course explores how some Christian thinkers have understood these central theological virtues. After considering New Testament sources, we will examine the following periods and thinkers: patristic (e.g. Augustine), medieval (Aquinas), reformation (Calvin), early modern (John of the Cross), and modern (Rahner, Lonergan, liberation theology). While special attention will be paid to the systematic thought of Aquinas, the goal of this course is to present a broad range of thinkers so that students can articulate their own account of these characteristic marks of Christian life.
Dominic Doyle

Last Updated: 17-JUL-12

TM 661 Seminar: Pathways to God Classic Texts on Christian Mysticism (Spring: 3)

Offered Periodically
Previous church history or historical theology desirable, but not required.
This course explores the theological and pastoral dimensions of classic texts on prayer and Christian mysticism. Texts are paired with specific topics, e.g: Bernard of Clairvaux (role of affectivity; contemplative prayer); Francis of Assisi (poverty, service); Cloud of Unknowing (centering prayer); Julian of Norwich (Jesus as mother); Ignatius of Loyola (discernment); John of the Cross (dark night); Teresa of Avila (mysticism); Teilhard de Chardin (God in the cosmos; Anthony de Mello (awareness; ¿Eastern¿ spirituality). Other topics: liturgy of the hours, icons, ¿everyday¿ mysticism. Lectures, and focused discussion of primary sources. Level 2.
Catherine Mooney

Last Updated: 13-FEB-13

TM 663 A Survey of Canon Law (Spring: 3)

An introductory survey of the canon law of the Catholic Church through an examination of the Code of Canon Law. Special attention is given to the rights and obligations of all the Christian faithful and of various groups within the Church (laity, clerics, consecrated persons) and to the universal and local ecclesial structures that foster and protect them. Parochial, educational and ecumenical issues are given due consideration. Generally not included are sacramental and marriage topics dealt with in TM 654.
James J. Conn, S.J.

Last Updated: 29-MAY-13

TM 666 Catholics and American Culture (Spring: 3)

Offered Periodically
Please note that the first class will meet on Friday, January 18th from 1:00-3:00 p.m. in room 243 at the STM. All other classes will meet on Mondays from 3:00-5:00 p.m.
This course examines the interaction between Catholic theology, liturgical practice, and intellectual traditions with American mainstream culture Using demographic, sociological, and theological resources, it will examines a series of specific issues: passing on the faith to younger generations, Catholic "market share" in the ecology of American denominations, the tradition of neo-Thomism, etc.
Mark Massa, S.J.

Last Updated: 08-NOV-12

TM 673 Seminar: The Cross in Christian Salvation (Fall: 3)

Prerequisite: Christology
School of Theology and Ministry course
This seminar will deal with the question of the salvific meaning of Christ’s suffering and death on the cross, as interpreted by major figures in the Christian tradition (including Irenaeus, Athanasius, Anselm, Aquinas, Palamas) and in modern theology (including von Balthasar, liberation theology, feminist theology, Eastern Orthodoxy, and René Girard).
Khaled Anatolios

Last Updated: 05-FEB-13

TM 674 Introduction to Latin I (Fall: 3)

School of Theology and Ministry course
This elementary course in Latin presumes no prior study of the language. Basic principles of Latin phonology, morphology and syntax will be treated in the weekly classes and reinforced by regular homework exercises and their review in class. Emphasis will be placed on the vocabulary that is proper to the various theological disciplines. This course is highly intensive and requires significant weekly work and a fair measure of independent learning.
James Conn, S.J.

Last Updated: 05-FEB-13

TM 675 Introduction to Latin II (Spring: 3)

Prerequisite: Intro to Latin I or equivalent.
Fulfills the Latin requirement for the S.T.L. degree
This is the second part of the Introduction to Latin course offered in the STM. Its objective is to enable the students to read theological, liturgical, biblical (Vulgate), and canonical texts with the help of a lexicon. It begins with unit 20 of A Primer of Ecclesiastical Latin by John F. Collins and completes the study of the textbook. The course presumes some previous study of Latin.
James Conn, S.J.

Last Updated: 15-FEB-13

TM 676.01 God and the Crucified People (Summer 2013: 2)

This course will raise up some of the central themes in the life work and liberation theology of Fr. Jon Sobrino, SJ. The cross of Jesus is the ultimate symbol of God¿s solidarity with the poor and suffering people of our world. Christians and the Christian community must live in similar solidarity and function as a sacrament of God¿s reign of justice for all.
Jon Sobrino, S.J. and James Nickoloff

Last Updated: 07-FEB-13

TM 677 Priesthood: Theology and Praxis (Spring: 3)

Prerequisite: Ecclesiology is a pre-requisite for counting this course for the Ecclesial Ministry requirement in the M.Div. curriculum.
Offered Periodically
This Level Two course is open to all students and focuses on ordained ministry of the Roman Catholic priesthood in terms of its biblical & theological foundations, historical development, contemporary issues, pastoral practice, & priestly spirituality, especially as treated in the pertinent ecclesial documents. Also treated are the cooperation between laity and clergy and the roles of lay ecclesial ministry as well as both tensions and critiques arising out of the Church¿s reservation of the priesthood to males and mandatory celibacy. Ecclesiology is a pre-requisite for counting this course for the Ecclesial Ministry requirement in the M.Div. curriculum.
James T. Bretzke, S.J. and James J. Conn, S.J.

Last Updated: 30-APR-13

TM 678 The Eucharist: re-creating a new world in memory of Christ (Spring: 3)

Offered Periodically
The Eucharist is the liturgical enactment of the saving mystery of Christ. It is a ritual that can transform the community that celebrates it to be a source of life in a broken and fragile world. This course examines the biblical roots of the Eucharist in the meal traditions of the Jewish people, in the table fellowship of Jesus, in his death on the Cross. It looks at how the Christian community has variously responded to the Lord's command to "do this in memory of me" until he comes again. The impact of historical controversies of contemporary debate is discussed.
Liam Bergin

Last Updated: 30-APR-13

TM 680.01 Theology for Mission & Ministry: Fifty Years After Vatican II (Summer 2013: 2)

The prominence of ¿ministry¿ as an issue in the contemporary Catholic Church is an outcome of the Second Vatican Council, even though ministry was not a focus of the council itself. This course will examine how ministry became a significant question for the contemporary church, its relationship to the teaching of the council, and the variety of topics that swirl around any discussion of mission in the church. A primary concern of the course will be to explore ministry in relation to the mission that all members of the church share, a mission to live the gospel in their time and place.
Richard Lennan

Last Updated: 07-MAR-13

TM 681 Patristic & Medieval Trinitarian Theology (Spring: 3)

Offered Periodically
This course will investigate the principal debates and achievements in Trinitarian theology in the patristic and medieval periods, with a particular focus on the Trinitarian theologies of Athanasius, the Cappadocians, and Augustine in the patristic period, and of Richard of St. Victor, Bonaventure, and Thomas Aquinas in the medieval period. The course will involve close reading of primary texts in their original languages as well as in English translation.
Khaled Anatolios and Boyd Coolman

Last Updated: 17-JUL-12

TM 683 Seminar in Practical Theology (Fall: 3)

Prerequisite: Four courses in theology and/or ministry
School of Theology and Ministry course
Christian theology at its best is marked by the pastoral interest of serving the life of the church in the world. Necessarily, the study of the church—specifically, its nature, purpose, and mission provides a framework within which to consider the task of practical theology. The methodology and issues that distinguish practical theology flow from this larger ecclesial context. This seminar will focus on models of the church, the art of doing theology in service of the church, and some foundational themes of practical theology (e.g., hermeneutics, praxis, culture and inculturation, and our post-modern context).
Nancy Pineda Madrid

Last Updated: 05-FEB-13

TM 685 Professional Ministry Practicum (Fall/Spring: 3)

Prerequisite: Students must meet with the professor before registering for this course.
This practicum is by permission of the instructor. Students should meet with the instructor early in their degree programs to allow sufficient time to plan an approved practicum experience.
The professional ministry practicum provides M.Div. students with an opportunity to integrate the academic study of theology and ministry with the exercise of a particular pastoral ministry under supervision. There are three required components of the professional ministry practicum. First, students are engaged in pastoral ministry in an approved setting for a required number of hours. Second, students are mentored by approved supervisors at the ministry site. Third, students participate in a course component to deepen their understanding of their ministry experience and to further develop pastoral and professional skills and sensitivities for ministry.
Melissa Kelley

Last Updated: 26-MAR-13

TM 685.01 Professional Ministry Practicum (Spring 2013-2014: 3)

Prerequisite: Students must meet with the professor before registering for this course.
This practicum is by permission of the instructor. Students should meet with the instructor early in their degree programs to allow sufficient time to plan an approved practicum experience.
The professional ministry practicum provides students with an opportunity to integrate the study of theology and ministry with the exercise of an ecclesial or institutional identity as a professional minister. The practicum offers a rare and invaluable opportunity to deepen one's ministerial identity and competency under the supervision of an experienced mentor. The course component offers opportunity for careful reflection on the ministry experience with peers.
Melissa Kelley

Last Updated: 15-FEB-13

TM 686.01 The New Evangelization (Summer 2013: 1)

Since the Second Vatican Council the concepts of evangelization and the new evangelization, which are closely linked, constitute a framework for understanding the Church¿s contemporary identity and mission. This course explores the background, reception, development and pastoral implementation of this vision particularly in the context of the global Church and the rising diversity, pluralism and secularity of the postmodern world. Basic documents of the magisterium such as Evangelii Nuntiandi, Redemptoris Missio, and Catechesi Tradendae together with documents of the 2012 Synod on the New Evangelization and of the U.S., Latin American, African and Asian bishops will provide a basis for this exploration.
Allan Figueroa Deck, S.J.

Last Updated: 06-FEB-13

TM 687.01 Religious Life: Vocation In & For the People of God (Summer 2013: 1)

This course will explore the contribution of Catholic ministerial Religious Life to the Church's mission to the world as proposed by Vatican II. The framework will an understanding of Religious Life as a prophetic life form in the Church and the lens through which we will explore mission and ministry will be the vows of evangelical poverty and prophetic obedience as the dynamics of community life and mission.
Sandra Schneiders, I.H.M.

Last Updated: 13-FEB-13

TM 690 CPE Reflection Experience (Fall/Spring: 1)

This one-credit experience is required of all M.Div. students who complete a unit of Clinical Pastoral Education (CPE) for academic credit. It offers the opportunity to examine and articulate the pastoral and professional learning one has gained through participation in CPE. Students prepare written summations of and reflections on their experiences and engage in an oral process of reflection with other participants.
Melissa Kelley

Last Updated: 20-MAR-13

TM 699 Directed Reading (Fall/Spring: 3)


STM Department

Last Updated: 13-FEB-13

TM 700.01 Adult Believers in A Postmodern Context (Summer 2013: 3)

This is a 3-week course that meets from 2:30-5:30 p.m. July 1 - July 19, 2013.
What are the dynamics that make adults ready and able to live effectively as people of faith in our contemporary postmodern context? What does it mean to be a believer in such a context and how are adults supported in the maturity of faith? Theology, psychology, and education theory all have a contribution to make in addressing these questions. Focused consideration is given to contemporary theories in adult development and adult learning. Attention is given to the implications of this for the parish/congregation, but broader applications are also considered.
Jane Regan

Last Updated: 05-FEB-13

TM 703 Seminar: Christ, Christians, and the Religions (Fall: 3)

Prerequisite: Christology
Offered Periodically
How can Christians understand the world religions as part of God's providential will to draw all people into the fullness of divine life? What can we learn from the phenomenon of interreligiousness and multiple religious belonging? How does this bear on Christian identity and the Church's mission of evangelization? This course will examine Church teaching and contemporary theology since Vatican II in order better to understand the significance, opportunities, and challenges of religious pluralism in today's world.
John R. Sachs, S.J.

Last Updated: 05-FEB-13

TM 712 Seminar: Karl Rahner (Spring: 3)

Offered Periodically
Limited to 15 students
This advanced seminar will explore the methodology and central themes of Rahner’s theology principally through detailed analysis and discussion of key essays in Theological Investigations. Intended for students with basic familiarity with Rahner’s work. Essays will be chosen on the basis of the particular interests of the participants at the first meeting of the seminar.
Randy Sachs, S.J.

Last Updated: 17-JUL-12

TM 717 Education of Christians: Past, Present, and Future (Spring: 3)

The history of the church's educational ministry serves to enlighten its present pastoral praxis. Students in this course read original and classical documents as a treasury of wisdom for religious education and pastoral ministry. The course will closely parallel the history of theology, of the church, and of Western education.
Thomas Groome

Last Updated: 17-JUL-12

TM 717.01 Education of Christians: Past, Present, and Future (Fall 2013-2014: 3)

School of Theology and Ministry course
This course takes students on a journey through the history of Christian educational practices and ideas. Participants read primary sources and documents that will help them analyze how such practices developed in conversation with major events in Western societies. The course closely parallels the history of the Church and Christian theological thought in Western societies. The ultimate goal of this course is to retrieve the Church's historical tradition of educating Christians, building on the best pedagogical insights developed through the centuries and envisioning future directions for Christian education.
Hosffman Ospino

Last Updated: 05-FEB-13

TM 722 Seminar: Saints and Sanctity (Fall: 3)

Prerequisite: A prior course in church history or historical theology is desirable, but not required.
Offered Periodically
School of Theology and Ministry course
This seminar examines the Christian saints from the formation of the cult of saints in early Christianity through the sixteenth century, with some attention to modern saints. Topics include how to read saints' lives; martyrdom; why notions of sanctity change; the difference between popularly proclaimed saints and papally canonized saints; the significance of shrines, relics and pilgrimage; gendered notions of sanctity; and the extent to which saints might be useful for contemporary spirituality. Extensive discussion of primary sources.
Catherine Mooney

Last Updated: 05-FEB-13

TM 724 Augustine (Spring: 3)

The course will examine foundational themes in major works of Augustine as he develops them in the contexts of his life and ministry. Taken broadly, these themes hinge on questions of interpretation: understanding his own search for God; the purpose and methods of Christian teaching and preaching; love of God and neighbor; sin, grace, and human nature; the mystery of the Trinity.
Khaled Anatolios

Last Updated: 05-NOV-13

TM 727 Two Great Councils: Trent and Vatican II (Spring: 3)

Prerequisite: At least one Systematics course.
Questions of theological cultures and styles and historical and ecclesial contexts are key to understanding and interpreting these two great councils, sometimes characterized and contrasted (mistakenly) as a "dogmatic" and a "pastoral" council. Lectures, extensive readings in the documents of each council, and discussion sections.
Francine Cardman

Last Updated: 15-FEB-13

TM 730 Spiritual Formation for Ministry (Fall/Spring: 1)

This two semester program, a requirement for first year M.A. in Pastoral Ministry and Master of Education students, cultivates practices for integrating faith, life, and ministry through prayer and reflection on central themes of spirituality for ministry. The program consists of two parts. First, a student commits to a small faith community, which meets twelve times during the academic year under the guidance of a trained facilitator. Second, a student creates a spiritual formation plan (SFP), the components of which may be fulfilled throughout the duration of one's degree program.
Barbara Quinn, RSCJ

Last Updated: 05-FEB-13

TM 730.01 Spiritual Formation for Ministry (Summer 2013: 1)

This program, a requirement for first year M.A. in Pastoral Ministry and Master of Education students, cultivates practices for integrating faith, life and ministry through prayer and reflection on central themes of spirituality for ministry. The program consists of two parts. First, a student commits to a small faith community, which meets six times in summer session under the guidance of a trained facilitator. Attendance at all six sessions is required for completion. Second, a student creates a spiritual formation plan (SFP), the components of which may be fulfilled throughout the duration of one's degree program. Graded on pass/fail basis. One credit is awarded.
Barbara Quinn, RSCJ

Last Updated: 12-JUL-13

TM 731 Writing and Research for Theology and Ministry (Fall/Spring: 1)

Offered Biennially
This course provides an introduction to writing and research for students engaged in STM degree programs. In the conviction that writing for theology and ministry invites a practical integration of theological, ministerial, and wider social worlds in its diverse modes of communication, this course imagines writing, research, and the theological and pastoral questions that engender them as integrated parts of an ongoing process of inquiry, reflection, and practice. Its goal is to invite students into that process through the questions arising from their own theological and ministerial study, engagement, and reflection.
Mary Overton

Last Updated: 15-MAY-13

TM 731.01 Writing and Research for Theology and Ministry (Spring 2012-2013: 1)

School of Theology and Ministry course
This course provides an introduction to writing and research for students engaged in STM degree programs. In the conviction that writing for theology and ministry invites a practical integration of theological, ministerial, and wider social worlds in its diverse modes of communication, this course imagines writing, research, and the theological and pastoral questions that engender them as integrated parts of an ongoing process of inquiry, reflection, and practice. Its goal is to invite students into that process through the questions arising from their own theological and ministerial study, engagement, and reflection.
Lucretia Yaghjian

Last Updated: 29-AUG-12

TM 738.01 Introduction to Pastoral Care and Counseling: Meaning Making through the Life Cycle (Summer 2013: 2)

This course is an introduction to the field of pastoral care and counseling with a particular emphasis on the fundamental human activity of meaning making as it occurs throughout the life cycle and in the context of human narratives. The focus will be on the role of the pastoral caregiver and the congregation in providing care through the developmental transitions of life, with attention also given to times of crisis. The course will provide psychological and theological models of meaning making and understandings of human wholeness and maturity using narrative and brief pastoral counseling approaches.
Brita Gill-Austern

Last Updated: 06-FEB-13

TM 747 Seminar: Body, Gender, Sexuality: Augustine and the Cappadocians (Spring: 3)

Prerequisite: previous course in early church history or theology and in systematic theology or ethics.
Offered Periodically
Permission required; enrollment limited to 14.
The seminar will explore inter-related aspects of body, gender, and sexuality in the heology, ethics, and preaching of Augustine, Basil of Caesarea, Gregory of Nyssa, and (though not a Cappadocian) John Chrysostom on some points. Major topics include: creation and the body; Eve/woman as helpmate; gender complementarity; sin and sexuality; marriage and procreation; virginity and continence; the debate over marriage. Sources include commentaries on Genesis 1-3, theological and ascetical treatises, sermons, and letters.
Francine Cardman

Last Updated: 17-JUL-12

TM 748 Introduction to Pastoral Care and Counseling: A Narrative Approach (Fall: 3)

In this introduction to pastoral care and counseling, you will reflect on the discipline as a charism for the whole people of God that can be practiced in empowering and teachable ways. Focusing on how people shape their lives through stories, you will explore congregational and personal family systems and self care practices. Particular topics to be addressed will be family counseling, violence, crisis ministry, depression, substance abuse, and boundaries in ministry. You will explore the theological horizons of pastoral care and counseling, including the interface between counseling ministry, sacramental ministry, and Ignatian spirituality.
Philip Browning Helsel

Last Updated: 05-FEB-13

TM 748.01 Introduction to Pastoral Care&Counseling:Narrative (Spring 2012-2013: 3)

School of Theology and Ministry course
In this introduction to pastoral care and counseling, you will reflect on the discipline as a charism for the whole people of God that can be practiced in empowering and teachable ways. Focusing on how people shape their lives through stories, you will explore congregational and personal family systems and self care practices. Particular topics to be addressed will be family counseling, violence, crisis ministry, depression, substance abuse, and boundaries in ministry. You will explore the theological horizons of pastoral care and counseling, including the interface between counseling ministry, sacramental ministry, and Ignatian spirituality.
Philip Browning Helsel

Last Updated: 05-JUN-12

TM 748.01 Introduction to Pastoral Care and Counseling: A Narrative Approach (Spring 2013-2014: 3)

In this introduction to pastoral care and counseling, you will reflect on the discipline as a charism for the whole people of God that can be practiced in empowering and teachable ways. Focusing on how people shape their lives through stories, you will explore congregational and personal family systems and self care practices. Particular topics to be addressed will be family counseling, violence, crisis ministry, depression, substance abuse, and boundaries in ministry. You will explore the theological horizons of pastoral care and counseling, including the interface between counseling ministry, sacramental ministry, and Ignatian spirituality.
Philip Browning Helsel

Last Updated: 15-FEB-13

TM 749 Trauma and Addiction (Fall: 3)

This course will explore recent research on the relationship between trauma and theology, describing both the effects of trauma—including symptoms such as addiction—and its theological and spiritual consequences. A central thesis of the course is that trauma interferes with both personal and communal memory. Students will review several approaches to trauma therapy, including those that help a person recover memory in a safe atmosphere—specifically using guided imagery—and surround that survivor with a community of memory. Attention will be given to healing both survivors and perpetrators and particularly addressing systems that attempt to silence trauma survivors.
Philip Browning Helsel

Last Updated: 05-FEB-13

TM 751 Supervised Practicum in Spiritual Direction (Fall/Spring: 6)

Prerequisite: An interview, preferably a month before the start of fall semester, to discuss prerequisites and background is a necessary step before registering for this practicum.
Graded Pass/Fail.
This practicum is a two-semester, six-credit course in which students direct 3 to 5 persons, receive supervision, and attend a three-hour seminar every week. Assigned readings, verbatims, and two term papers are part of the course.
Ellen Keane

Last Updated: 05-FEB-13

TM 754 Theology of Culture (Spring: 3)

Offered Periodically
This course explores the relationship between theology and culture through the following questions: How do particular cultures shape Christian faith? How has the Church, for better or worse, changed (or failed to change) the various cultures into which it has been received? How are rapid advances in technology shaping culture and how should the Church respond? How do theologians navigate between their local context and global economic realities that influence all locales? How does the study of culture, which integrates the various branches of inquiry into human meaning, challenge and invigorate theological reflection?
Dominic Doyle

Last Updated: 17-JUL-12

TM 755 Women in Ministry (Spring: 3)

Offered Periodically
This course aims to help women develop their understanding of the practice and theology of ministry by taking experiences of ministry with and by women as a starting point for reflection. Developing feminist process is also a goal of the course. Part of the syllabus will be determined on the basis of participants' interests and goals; there will be opportunities to share leadership of class sessions. Resources from feminist theology, spirituality, theory, and ethics will inform the work of the course, along with church documents and sources from the social sciences.
Francine Cardman

Last Updated: 17-JUL-12

TM 756 Feminist Theologies and the Question of Salvation (Spring: 3)

Prerequisite: Introductory Theology or Christology course.
Offered Periodically
A critical study of the challenges and contributions to the question of salvation being offered by major feminist theologians (Shussler Fiorenza, Ruether, Johnson, Williams, Gebara, and others). We will analyze how the soteriological task gets framed, particularly in relation to suffering, to the cross, to hope, and to emancipation, as well as to other developing themes. Attention will be given to the critique and appropriation of the Christian tradition.
Nancy Pineda-Madrid

Last Updated: 15-FEB-13

TM 757 Seminar: Reconciliation in A World of Conflict (Fall: 3)

Offered Periodically
The twentieth century's legacy is marked by social conflict and war: more than 200 million people killed because of political repression, ethnic or religious wars. Enlisting a theological lens, this seminar examines the Christian resources and contribution to the problem of reconciliation. After examining the most important secular approaches to the problem of personal and social conflict, we will focus on the main Christian theologies of reconciliation, including the works of Robert Schreiter, Miroslav Volf, John de Gruchy, and Jon Sobrino. Their theologies will be examined through individual case studies of the Balkan region, South Africa, and El Salvador.

Ernesto Valiente

Last Updated: 01-MAR-13

TM 759 Seminar:Genesis: New Methods, Different Approaches (Spring: 3)

Prerequisite: Basic Old Testament course. Hebrew desirable but not required.
Offered Periodically
In addition to traditional methods like source criticism and form criticism, recent years have seen the emergence of new methods: literary criticism, anthropological and sociological study, feminist hermeneutics and canonical criticism. This seminar will look at Genesis from both the traditional and the newer methods. Lectures, discussion of supplied readings, and student presentations and papers.
Richard Clifford, S.J.

Last Updated: 15-FEB-13

TM 760 History of the Jesuits: Origins to the Suppression of 1773 (Spring: 3)

Offered Periodically
School of Theology and Ministry course
The course surveys the origins, development, cultural impact and influences, and diverse ministries of the Society of Jesus across Europe and the globe, from the founding era of St. Ignatius Loyola (1491-1556) through the era of the Jesuits¿ suppression in 1773 by Pope Clement XIV. Topics covered by the course include the history of Jesuit education and charitable ministries, overseas and rural European missions, artistic and scientific endeavors, participation in theological and political controversies of the Reformation and Enlightenment eras, and pastoral and collaborative relationships with the laity and other clergy and religious, including lay and religious women.
Bronwen Catherine McShea

Last Updated: 10-DEC-12

TM 762 John and Virtue Ethics (Spring: 3)

Cross Listed with TH712
School of Theology and Ministry course
An examination of select texts in John's Gospel, 1-3 John, and Revelation with a focus on their possible contributions to virtue ethics and issues in moral theology today.
Daniel Harrington, S.J. and James Keenan, S.J.

Last Updated: 09-OCT-12

TM 763 Scripture and Christian Ethics (Fall: 3)

Prerequisite: One graduate course in Bible and one graduate course in ethics or moral theology.
This Level three course analyzes the presuppositions, limits, and possibilities for integration of Scripture in fundamental and applied Christian ethics, the principal hermeneutical and exegetical issues connected with the use of Scripture in Christian ethics (including feminist and liberationist ethics), the debate between the Faith¿Ethics (Ratzinger, Schürmann, von Balthasar, et al.) vs. the Moral Autonomy Schools (Demmer, Fuchs, McCormick, Sch¿ller, et al.) as well as an evaluation of the principal methodological contributions of Protestant and Catholic authors including Fowl & Jones, Furnish, Gustafson, Harrington & Keenan, Hays, Hauerwas, HR Niebuhr, Ogletree, Schneiders, Schrage, Schüssler-Fiorenza, Siker, Spohn, and Yoder.
James Bretzke, S.J.

Last Updated: 05-FEB-13

TM 764 Ethical Themes in Augustine (Fall: 3)

Prerequisite: Masters courses in Systematics, Ethics and Early Church History.
Offered Periodically
This is a doctoral level seminar intended for advanced degree students (STL, STD, PhD) and presupposes previous preparation in early church history or patristic theology and in ethics or moral theology. Departmental permission required.
The seminar explores foundational theological and ethical themes in Augustine¿s works (e.g., love, sociality, sin and grace, moral agency, evil) and examines the way in which those themes function in selected texts and topics in Augustine¿s ethics (e.g., love of God and neighbor; poverty, riches, property; gender and sexual ethics; religious coercion and ¿just war¿; social and political life). Extensive readings in primary sources in translation and short weekly papers are the basis for focused class discussion. At least one longer seminar paper and a final research paper are required.
Francine Cardman

Last Updated: 07-MAR-13

TM 765 Prophetic Pastoral Care (Spring: 3)

Offered Periodically

Melissa Kelley

Last Updated: 15-FEB-13

TM 767 Ministry in a Diverse Church: Latino Perspectives and Beyond (Fall: 3)

School of Theology and Ministry
Catholicism in the United States is presently shaped by rich cultural traditions that demand creative approaches to ministry in the midst of diversity. Nearly 45% of all Catholics in the country are Hispanic, 40% Euro-American, 4% Asian-American, 3.7% African-American, among others. Students in this course explore key questions and discuss ministerial strategies that will help them develop cultural competencies for effective ministry today. The course builds on the U.S. Latino/a Catholic experience as a case study while addressing core issues in ministry that affect everyone in the Church. Ecumenical and international perspectives are welcomed into this conversation.
Hosffman Ospino

Last Updated: 05-FEB-13

TM 767.01 Ministry in a Culturally Diverse Church: Perspectives (Summer 2013: 2)

Catholicism in the United States is presently shaped by rich cultural traditions that demand creative approaches to ministry in the midst of diversity. Nearly 45% of all Catholics in the country are Hispanic, 40% Euro-American, 4% Asian-American, 3.7% African-American, among others. Students in this course explore key questions and discuss ministerial strategies that will help them develop cultural competencies for effective ministry today. The course builds on the U.S. Latino/a Catholic experience as a case study while addressing core issues in ministry that affect everyone in the Church. Ecumenical and international perspectives are welcomed into this conversation.
Hosffman Ospino

Last Updated: 05-FEB-13

TM 772 Theological Critiques From the Margin (Fall: 3)

Prerequisite: Fundamental Moral Theology or Critical Contemporary Ethical Issues
Offered Periodically
Level 2 course
Dominant western and northern theology faces a critique from the margins of race, gender, age, sex, culture, and disability. This course explores the contexts of those critiques, key texts challenging the dominant narrative and its responses admitting injustice, dismantling structural sins, and beginning the work of communion, solidarity, reparation, and restoration to which the Gospel calls. Attention will be given to the advent of liberation and other context-based theologies in the developing world and the global north where the power to marginalize has been institutionalized yet where the cry of the poor is heard and signs of heeding emerge.
Mary Jo Iozzio

Last Updated: 20-MAR-13

TM 773 Pastoral Care of the Family (Spring: 3)

This course presents specific topics that are important for effective and compassionate pastoral care of families today. We will examine challenging realities that may shape and/or disturb families and lead members to seek pastoral care, such as domestic violence, substance abuse, imprisonment of a family member, grief and loss, and family caregiver stress. We will consider the specific needs of families affected by injustices and harsh difficulties such as poverty and immigrant/refugee status. We will consider the specific roles and strategies of the pastoral caregiver and the faith community in helping families to negotiate challenges and create stability and well-being.
Melissa Kelley

Last Updated: 26-MAR-13

TM 780 Advanced Professional Ministry Practicum (Fall/Spring: 3)

Prerequisite: Completion of the Professional Ministry Practicum.
The Advanced Professional Ministry Practicum provides advanced M.Div. or Th.M. students with opportunities for exercising ministerial leadership in settings requiring both advanced ministerial experience and professional expertise in a field other than theology. The aim is to conjoin expertise in another professional field (e.g., health care, law, economics, social work, education, international affairs, etc.) with the practice of ministry. The student is mentored by experienced ministers. The course component offers opportunity for careful reflection on the experience with peers. Students should meet with the instructor early on to allow sufficient time to plan an approved practicum experience.
Melissa Kelley

Last Updated: 05-FEB-13

TM 785 Theological Anthropology and the Body (Spring: 3)

Issues of embodiment relating to theology, spirituality, and ministry form the substance of this course. We will probe understandings of the body found in the historical Christian tradition and draw insights regarding human bodiliness from contemporary theology, philosophy, psychology, and social theory. Finally, we will examine the role of the body in lived Christian faith with a particular emphasis on spirituality, education, and pastoral care.
Colleen Griffith

Last Updated: 14-FEB-13

TM 787 Diaconate Practicum (Fall/Spring: 3)

Prerequisite: Completion of the Professional Ministry Practicum
The Diaconate Practicum provides advanced M.Div. or Th.M. students with opportunities for ministering as a deacon in parish settings while being mentored by experienced ministers. The course component offers opportunity for careful reflection on the experience with peers. Students should meet with the instructor early on to allow sufficient time to plan an approved practicum experience.
Melissa Kelley

Last Updated: 05-FEB-13

TM 790.01 Spirituality & Christian Life:Historic Traditions & Contemporary Practice (Summer 2013: 2)

This course explores approaches to the spirituality and practice of the Christian life in four contrasting traditions from different contexts: Early desert monasticism, Julian of Norwich¿s "practical mysticism", Ignatian spirituality and Gustavo Gutierrez' social spirituality. The course examines the key themes, spiritual practices and underlying theologies of the four spiritualities, and how they may be reinterpreted and applied in the 21st century global Church. Themes include the personal and ecclesial dimensions of discipleship; our relationship with God; human identity and spiritual development; asceticism and embodiment; contemplation and action; prayer and social transformation; ministry and mission; discernment and practical wisdom.
Philip Sheldrake

Last Updated: 06-FEB-13

TM 791 Spirituality and Justice: Twentieth Century Writings (Spring: 3)

This course will survey spiritual writings from the twentieth century, examining the generative themes that are suggestive for our time and foundational in the construction of a contemporary spirituality. Authors will include Thomas Merton, Evelyn Underhill, Teilhard de Chardin, Dorothy Day, Annie Dillard, Johannes Baptist Metz, and Martin Buber. The course is taught with an eye toward leadership in spiritual formation.
Colleen Griffith

Last Updated: 14-FEB-13

TM 795 Spiritual Classics in Theological Persepctive (Fall: 3)

This course will survey historical classics, examining the generative themes that are suggestive for our time and foundational in the construction of a contemporary spirituality. Authors will include Augustine, Benedict, Francis and Clare of Assisi, Julian of Norwich, Catherine of Genoa, Ignatius of Loyola, Teresa of Avila, and John of the Cross. Thematic questions will be brought to the reading of core texts.
Colleen Griffith

Last Updated: 12-APR-13

TM 799 Advanced Directed Reading (Fall: 3)


The Department

Last Updated: 13-FEB-13

TM 799.01 Advanced Directed Reading (Spring 2012-2013: 3)


DEPT

Last Updated: 16-JUL-12

TM 802 Seminar: Theology, Education and Liberation (Spring: 03)

What does it mean to “teach as Jesus taught,” especially in situations where human dignity is threatened and compromised by vulnerability, catastrophe, terror, uncertainty, and misery? Using the writings of Brazilian theorist Paulo Freire as a point of reference for theological inquiry and critical reflection, this course sets Freire’s insights in conversation with those of contemporary biblical scholars, theologians, educators and philosophers who believe “another world is possible.” The course examines the interconnectedness of love, hope, faith, freedom, wonder, dialogue and moral agency in promoting the Gospel of life and counteracting the “culture of death.”
Margaret Guider, O.S.F.

Last Updated: 17-JUL-12

TM 806 Identity: From Discovery to Integration (Spring: 3)

Prerequisite: Prior coursework in youth and young adult ministry and/or developmental theory and permission required.
The intent of this course is to consider the process of identity formation in adolescents and young adults. Recognizing that the need to form personal identity only comes to the fore in adolescence and is refined and integrated throughout adulthood, this course will examine the questions and concerns that surround that discovery and integration process. Rather than posit an "answer," participants in this course will pursue the question: how might we attend ministerially to young people growing through this process? It will be conducted in seminar format, whereby participants will be responsible for conducting topic discussions for the class.
Theresa O'Keefe

Last Updated: 17-JUL-12

TM 811 Development of Christological Doctrine (Spring: 3)

Jesus' question to his disciples, "Who do you say that I am?" (Mk 8:29) received a definitive response in Church doctrine only through a long and tumultuous process of development. In seeking to formulate our own responses to this question, we need to appropriate the contents of this process. The project of this course is to integrate contemporary questions with those that generated the development of christological doctrine so that we may delve deeper into the mystery of the human-divine identity of Jesus Christ.
Khaled Anatolios

Last Updated: 21-MAR-12

TM 813 Theological Bioethics: From the Basics to the Future (Fall: 3)

The Course addresses, first, the basics issues in bioethics focusing on the beginning of human life (reproductive technologies, prenatal diagnosis, abortion), biomedical research (transplantation, AIDS, genetic research, stem cell research), sustainability, and the end of human life (palliative care, vegetative state, euthanasia). Second, it discusses the bioethical concerns raised by developing biotechnologies (e.g., neurosciences, oncofertility, nanotechnology, cyborg technologies). By studying the current theological debate and the Catholic Magisterium, principles and theories will be highlighted aiming at supporting personal decision-making and pastoral service.
Andrea Vicini, S.J.

Last Updated: 02-APR-13

TM 815 Theological Anthropology (Spring: 03)

Offered Periodically
What is the Christian vision of humanity? This course examines key aspects of human life in the light of Christian revelation including: the human person as created in the image of God; finitude, suffering, and sin; forgiveness and sanctification; grace and nature; gender and sexuality; community; and Ignatian spirituality. Readings from Rahner, Balthasar, Ernest Becker, Lisa Cahill, Anne Carr, Mary Aquin O'Neill, David Kelsey, Roger Haight, Michelle Gonzalez and others.
John R. Sachs, S.J.

Last Updated: 05-FEB-13

TM 815.01 Theological Anthropology (Fall 2013-2014: 3)

Corequisite: At least one semester of graduate theology.
What is the Christian vision of humanity? This course examines key aspects of human life in the light of Christian revelation including: the human person as created in the image of God; finitude, suffering, and sin; forgiveness and sanctification; grace and nature; gender and sexuality; community; and Ignatian spirituality. Readings from Rahner, Balthasar, Ernest Becker, Lisa Cahill, Anne Carr, Mary Aquin O'Neill, David Kelsey, Roger Haight, Michelle Gonzalez and others.
John R. Sachs, S.J.

Last Updated: 05-FEB-13

TM 816 Sharing Faith in Religious Education and Pastoral Ministry (Fall: 3)

School of Theology and Ministry course
This course will propose the foundations for a participatory and empowering approach to religious education and pastoral ministry. Such foundations include the theological anthropology, ecclesiology, soteriology and eschatology that should undergird religious education and ministry. Through shared reflection on praxis and on course readings, participants will be invited to appropriate and make decisions about their own approaches to the ministry of "sharing faith."
Thomas Groome

Last Updated: 05-FEB-13

TM 816.01 Sharing Faith in Religious Education & Pastoral Ministry (Summer 2013: 2)

This course will propose the foundations for a participatory and empowering approach to religious education and pastoral ministry. Such foundations include the theological anthropology, ecclesiology, soteriology and eschatology that should undergird religious education and ministry. Through shared reflection on praxis and on course readings, participants will be invited to appropriate and make decisions about their own approaches to the ministry of "sharing faith."
Thomas Groome

Last Updated: 11-MAR-13

TM 817 Global Health and Theological Ethics (Spring: 3)

Prerequisite: One course in Bioethics.
Offered Periodically
Level 3 course
The Course engages theological ethics in promoting global health as an urgent good and right that is integral to a vision of just society. Global health challenges (from HIV/AIDS to poverty and underdevelopment) are studied by highlighting international examples (from Asia, Africa, and the Americas) that help to identify the theological agenda and to implement it. Public health concerns and universal health coverage are part of this agenda worldwide. The course's theological analyses and proposals rely on Catholic and Protestant insights (from social doctrine to philosophical and theological bioethical discourse).
Andrea Vicini, S.J.

Last Updated: 02-APR-13

TM 818 Ministry for Mission Seminar (Spring: 3)

School of Theology and Ministry course
The seminar, enrollment in which is required for all MDiv-1 students, is a 3-credit course run over two semesters; the credits are awarded at the end of the second semester. The seminar promotes the human formation of the student, particularly the integration of human and ministerial identity. The seminar, through its methodology and content, complements, without repeating, what is done in the human, spiritual, and pastoral formation programs that are integral to the MDiv. It also builds on other academic courses in the MDiv, particularly the theology of church and the theology of ministry
Margaret Guider, O.S.F.

Last Updated: 14-FEB-13

TM 819 Integrating Faith, Counseling and Service of Justice (Spring: 3)

What are the spiritual and theological resources that energize persons to serve in ministries of personal and social justice? How does a vocation of care unite diverse fields such as pastoral ministry, social work, and counseling? In this advanced course in pastoral care and counseling you will explore these questions by examining the implicit theological and spiritual components, histories and themes, of the psychotherapeutic “schools.” This course help you access resources to support your own vocation as a person who gives care and seeks justice.
Philip Browning Helsel

Last Updated: 15-FEB-13

TM 821 Grief and the Bible (Spring: 3)

Graduate students only. No prerequisites. Maximum 24 students. Fulfills: MTS Bible core; MDiv OT core.
Grief, a universal and timeless human experience, is the response to painful loss. This interdisciplinary course will consider the grief experience in light of both biblical and pastoral studies. We will bring consideration of the interpretation of biblical texts into conversation with critical aspects of grief, including attachment and separation, narrative disruption, and meaning-making after loss and trauma. We will consider how engagement with biblical texts within communities of faith might serve specific sacramental and pastoral purposes, including: to articulate and to hold the human experience of loss and grief; and to enable transformative and healing encounters with God.
Christopher Frechette, S.J. and Melissa Kelley

Last Updated: 02-FEB-12

TM 822 Human Genetics and Biotechnologies:Challenges for Theological Ethics (Spring: 3)

Offered Periodically
The course examines, first, the ethical issues raised by human genetics. It focuses on: genetic information, testing, screening, therapy, pharmacogenomics, and enhancement. Second, it studies new biotechnologies that rely on genetics (synthetic biology and regenerative medicine). Third, it discusses current biotechnological developments in neurosciences, oncofertility, nanotechnology, cyborg technologies, and artificial intelligence. In dialogue with philosophers and theologians, the proposed theological approach addresses the ethical issues that surface in research, in clinical practice, and in pastoral settings.
Andrea Vicini, S.J.

Last Updated: 17-JUL-12

TM 823 Seminar: Jesuits and Theology (Spring: 3)

Offered Periodically
Starting from two conceptions of “Jesuit theology” put forward by Avery Dulles and Christophe Théobald, this seminar will take as primary texts a wide-ranging selection from Jesuit theologians (dogmatic and moral) from the sixteenth century onwards, supported as appropriate by materials conventionally studied under the heading of Ignatian and Jesuit spirituality. The aim will be for the group to explore together what it might mean to do theology at once in the modern academy and in the Jesuit/Ignatian tradition.
Philip Endean, S.J.

Last Updated: 17-JUL-12

TM 824 Catholic Healthcare: History, Contexts, Values, and Principles (Spring: 3)

Prerequisite: One course in Bioethics.
Offered Periodically
Level 3 course
The Course examines the Catholic healthcare by highlighting, first, key historical elements and a few inspiring figures (among healthcare professionals and religious women) in the USA and in other countries. Second, a specific attention will be given to the ethical issues in social structures (e.g., hospitals, long-term care and assisted living facilities, rehabilitation centers, medical schools, and the family) and in critical locations (e.g., marked by poverty, war, and pandemics). Third, the ethical decision-making will be articulated by considering the various moral agents, the theological resources (i.e., values, virtues, principles, and the social justice tradition), cases, and concrete praxes.
Andrea Vicini, S.J.

Last Updated: 02-APR-13

TM 826 Introduction to the Old Testament (Spring: 3)

Geared toward the pastoral interests of students, this course introduces the core narrative of the Old Testament (passages from Genesis through 2 Kings) as well as prophetic books (passages from Amos and Isaiah) and wisdom literature (passages from Psalms and Job). Engaging current theological and pastoral issues, we will interpret biblical texts within the cultural, historical, literary and theological contexts from which they emerged.
Michael Simone, S.J.

Last Updated: 15-MAY-13

TM 826.01 Introduction to the Old Testament (Summer 2013: 2)

This course is a literary, historical, and theological introduction to the Old Testament (Hebrew Bible), which will introduce the major genre of this ancient collection (history, law, poetry, prophecy, wisdom literature, apocalyptic and novellas). There will be short in-class assessments of daily reading, two take-home exams, and one paper. Given the brevity of the course meetings, and the vast amount of material, students are asked to read beforehand the biblical books mentioned above, as well as the relevant sections of the textbooks prior to the first class meeting.
Corrine Carvalho

Last Updated: 11-MAR-13

TM 827 The Virtues and Catholic Social Teaching (Spring: 3)

Prerequisite: Introduction to Catholic Social Ethics and Fundamental Moral Theology
Offered Periodically
Virtue ethics enjoys a long history in the Catholic theological tradition and within the last century ethicists have looked to integrate the virtues explicitly with other theological disciplines ¿from scripture and dogmatic theology to liturgical and modern Catholic thought. This course investigates the connections between virtue and the practical invitations to social action with and for others in CST and explores the thought of Aquinas and contemporary theological appropriations of the virtues in dialogue with the principles of CST. In particular, attention will be given to identifying which trajectory ¿virtue or CST¿best grounds and which best informs action.
Mary Jo Iozzio

Last Updated: 20-MAR-13

TM 828 Seminar: Irenaeus and Origen (Spring: 3)

Offered Periodically
This course will entail a close reading of some major texts by two of the most influential theologians of the early Church, Irenaeus of Lyons and Origen.
Khaled Anatolios

Last Updated: 19-FEB-13

TM 831 Directed Research in Religious Education (Fall/Spring: 3)


DEPT

Last Updated: 13-FEB-13

TM 840 Master of Divinity Closure Seminar (Spring: 3)

This seminar promotes the integration of theory and practice, as well as formation, for collaboration and partnership in ministry. Discussions, group work, and team projects are some of the components of the seminar, which concludes with the M.Div. Convocation in April. The seminar brings closure to the M.Div. program by providing a structured forum for collectively exercising and applying the skills and knowledge acquired during the degree program.
Thomas Kane, C.S.P.

Last Updated: 13-FEB-13

TM 853.01 Post-Masters Certificate in Spiritual Formation: Arts & Group Models/Direct (Summer 2013: 2)

The purpose of this program is to enable pastoral leaders to become spiritual mentors for individual persons and Christian communities of faith. The program of studies consists of daily morning sessions that focus on the theoretical foundations of spirituality work and afternoon sessions devoted to the practical art of spiritual guidance.
Colleen Griffith

Last Updated: 05-FEB-13

TM 854 Catholic Higher Education (Spring: 3)

Cross Listed with ED854
This course will offer an historical overview, a survey of current scholarship and related Church documents, and an examination of the role of Catholic higher education, particularly in the U.S., and its relationship with the Church and society. This course will also engage students in an analysis of contemporary issues facing Catholic higher education, particularly faith and reason, the Catholic intellectual tradition, Catholic social thought, governance and leadership models, student development, and institutional mission, identity, and culture.
Michael James

Last Updated: 10-JUL-12

TM 857 Legal Aspects of Real Estate (Spring: 3)

Cross Listed with MJ 857
Not open to undergraduates.
Attendance is mandatory unless absence is excused in advance.

This team-taught course will emphasize current contested areas in real estate development practice. Subjects in commercial practice, such as acquisition and disposition, restructuring, taxation, tax abatements, financing, marketing, zoning, and sustainability and the like, will be discussed. Leading real estate practitioners will be invited to class to make presentations on their current construction projects.
Frank J. Parker, S.J.

Last Updated: 28-NOV-11

TM 862 The Postexilic Books of the Bible: The Community Rebuilds (Fall: 3)

Prerequisite: Intro OT
An examination of the later books of the Old Testament, from the perspective of a community rebuilding its life and institutions after destruction.
Daniel J. Harrington, S.J.

Last Updated: 05-FEB-13

TM 867 Violence and Forgiveness (Spring: 3)


John McDargh

Last Updated: 17-JUL-12

TM 868 Religion and Higher Education (Fall: 3)

This course explores the historic relationship between religion and higher education, primarily within the American context. After preliminary discussion of the nature of education and religion, it examines church-related higher education in the U.S. as well as the role and place of religion in the academy at large. Topics include secularism, modernity, and challenges to Christian higher education; religious pluralism; religion in secular higher education; legal issues surrounding religion and higher education; and modernism, post-modernism, post-secularism, and the tensions and opportunities that these cultural/intellectual movements pose for religion and higher learning.
Michael James

Last Updated: 13-FEB-13

TM 880 M.T.S. Thesis (Fall/Spring: 6)


Dominic Doyle

Last Updated: 05-FEB-13

TM 881 Th.M. Thesis (Fall/Spring: 6)


Thomas Kane, C.S.P.

Last Updated: 05-FEB-13

TM 882 Psychotherapy and Spirituality (Fall: 03)

Prerequisite: Undergraduates require permission of instructor.
Cross Listed with TH880
Offered Periodically
Participants explore the theoretical and practical integration of theological and psychological perspectives in the practices of clinical psychotherapy and pastoral counseling and spiritual direction.
John McDargh

Last Updated: 05-FEB-13

TM 888 Masters Interim Study (Fall/Spring: 0)


DEPT

Last Updated: 15-FEB-13

TM 900 STL Colloquium (Fall: 3)

School of Theology and Ministry course

Thomas Stegman, S.J.

Last Updated: 13-FEB-13

TM 915 PhD-STL Colloquium (Fall/Spring: 0)


Thomas Stegman, S.J.

Last Updated: 15-FEB-13

TM 920 Ph.D. Comprehensive Examinations (Fall/Spring: 0)


The Department

Last Updated: 05-FEB-13

TM 936.01 Spirituality & Sexuality (Summer 2013: 2)

This course explores, through theological and psychological texts, literature, poetry and film, the intricate interconnection between the ways in which human persons are oriented toward a relationship to the dimension of the transcendent and the Holy (spirituality), and the reality of our creation as embodied, desiring beings who seek fulfillment and connection through a wide variety of interpersonal relationships (sexuality). More simply, we shall consider in a way both contemplative and critical these two related questions: "How does the experience of sexuality at its depth open on to the dimension of Spirit?" and "How is our spiritual life necessarily and inextricably bound up with our lived experience as passionate, sexual persons?" The course is not strictly speaking a course in Christian sexual ethics, though the question of what constitutes the 'good' of human sexual expression is essential and unavoidable. It is a course in theological anthropology that takes seriously the actual, empirical experience of human sexuality in all its diversity and complexity.
John McDargh

Last Updated: 05-FEB-13

TM 980 S.T.D. Specialized Research (Fall/Spring: 6)


John R. Sachs, S.J.

Last Updated: 05-FEB-13

TM 985 S.T.L. Thesis (Fall/Spring: 9)


Thomas Stegman, S.J.

Last Updated: 05-FEB-13

TM 990 S.T.L. Continuation (Fall/Spring: 0)

Offered Biennially

The Department

Last Updated: 05-FEB-13

TM 994 Education for Justice and Peace (Spring: 3)

Offered Periodically
The course begins with an investigation of the tools of social analysis as a means of getting beneath the surface of issues of injustice, followed by a review of Catholic social teachings as a means of offering a theological foundation for educating for justice. Finally, it looks at educational methods from the early 20th century to the present that reflect on education itself as a work of justice. The course concludes with student groups presenting lessons in which they have used tools of investigation and analysis on an issue, incorporated theological reflection, and developed a methodology for effective education.
Theresa O'Keefe

Last Updated: 15-FEB-13

TM 999 Ph.D. Continuation (Fall/Spring: 1)


The Department

Last Updated: 05-FEB-13