EN 511 Faulkner (Spring: 3)

A great writer," asserts Deleuze, "carves out a nonpreexistent foreign language within his own language": this is the exhilaration of Faulkner. Few writers have so made English their own: from his syntax and usage to the instantly recognizable cadences of a prosodic rhythm like no other, his is as a foreign language in the American tradition. Attending to this language and its pleasures, we will also explore Faulkner's America. For few writers have been as perceptive about the categories of American personhood—especially race, class, gender, and region—and their power to mark, with violence, human bodies and minds.
Kevin Ohi

Last Updated: 30-JAN-13