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Course Descriptions

UPDATED FOR 2014 SUMMER SESSIONS 1 and 2

ACCOUNTING

ADAC 108101  Elementary Accounting I: Financial Accountin
g
The basic accounting course. Financial statements, fundamental accounting concepts, procedures, terminology and contemporary financial reporting are introduced.
May 13–June 19, T TH, 6:00-9:15 p.m.
Thomas Huse


ADAC 208201  Elementary Accounting II: Managerial Accounting
Prerequisite: Financial Accounting or equivalent.
The relationship of accounting to the managerial decision-making process of planning, control and analysis. Product costing, cost volume-profit relationships, cash budgeting and profit planning, standard cost analysis and performance evaluation are included with related ethical issues.
June 24–July 31, T TH, 6:00-9:15 p.m.
John Glynn



BIOLOGY

BIOL 130001  Anatomy and Physiology I

Corequisite for Boston College students: BIOL 1310
This introductory course lays the foundation for the understanding of human anatomy and physiology and is intended for Nursing/Allied Health Professions students. The first portion of the course covers cellular and molecular aspects of eukaryotic cell function: basic chemistry, macromolecules, cell structure, membrane transport, metabolism, gene expression, cell cycle control, and genetics. The course continues with the study of several organ systems beginning with the Integument, which is followed by the Skeletal and Muscular Systems, and ending with the Nervous System. The cellular and molecular basis for the functions of these systems is an integral element of this portion of the course.
Does not satisfy Natural Science Core Requirement for BC students. This course is intended for Nursing/Allied Health Professions students. Boston College biology majors/premed students must obtain department approval before registering for this course.
June 23–July 10, M T W TH, 8:15-11:00 a.m.
Carol Chaia Halpern


BIOL 131001  Anatomy and Physiology Lab I
Laboratory exercises intended to familiarize students with the various structures and principles discussed in BIOL 1300 through the use of anatomical models, physiological experiments, and limited dissection. Lab fee required. Does not satisfy Natural Science Core Requirement for BC students. This course is intended for Nursing/Allied Health Professions students. Boston College biology majors/premed students must obtain department approval before registering for this course.
June 23–July 9, M T W, 11:15 a.m.-1:30 p.m.
Carol Chaia Halpern


BIOL 132001  Anatomy and Physiology II
Corequisite for Boston College students: BIOL 1330
The second portion of this introductory course is a continuation of BIOL 1300/1310, with a primary emphasis on the physiology of the major body systems. Systems studied in this course include the sensory, endocrine, cardiovascular, lymphatic, immune, respiratory, digestive, urinary, and reproductive systems. While the physiological functions under normal conditions are emphasized, relevant disease or dysfunctional conditions are also discussed. Does not satisfy Natural Science Core Requirement for BC students. This course is intended for Nursing/Allied Health Professions students. Boston College biology majors/premed students must obtain department approval before registering for this course.
July 14–July 31, M T W TH, 8:15-11:00 a.m.
Carol Chaia Halpern


BIOL 133001  Anatomy and Physiology Lab II
A continuation of BIOL 1310. Does not satisfy Natural Science Core Requirement for BC students. This course is intended for Nursing/Allied Health Professions students. Boston College biology majors/premed students must obtain department approval before registering for this course.
July 14–July 30, M T W, 11:15 a.m.-1:30 p.m.
Carol Chaia Halpern



BIOL 200001  Molecules and Cells
Foundational course required for Biology majors that introduces students to living systems at the molecular and cellular level of organization. Topics introduced in this course include basic cellular biochemistry, gene regulation, cellular organization and metabolism, and cell signaling
and genetics.
June 23–July 10, M T W TH, 8:15-11:30 a.m.
Linda Tanini


BIOL 201001  Ecology and Evolution
Foundational course required for Biology majors with a focus on the ecology and resilience of living systems across all levels of spatial scales. Topics introduced in this course include evolution, population dynamics, behavioral ecology, ecosystems, co-evolution, and human ecology.
July 14–July 31, M T W TH, 8:15-11:30 a.m.
Linda Tanini


BIOL 210001  General Biology Laboratory I
The first semester of a two-semester introductory biology laboratory course designed for non-biology majors preparing for graduate programs in health professions. This course teaches basic laboratory skills, including microscopy, spectrophotometry, analytical electrophoresis and molecular cloning.  Students are introduced to the principles of experimental design, data analysis and data interpretation. Inquiry-based activities include experiments in biochemistry, cell physiology and molecular biology.
June 23–July 10, M T W TH, 12:00-2:15 p.m.
Linda Tanini


BIOL 211001  General Biology Laboratory II
The continuation of BIOL2100. Inquiry-based activities include experiments in organismic biology, ecology and field biology.
July 14–July 31, M T W TH, 12:00-2:15 p.m.
Linda Tanini



BIOL 220001  Microbiology for Health Professionals
Prerequisite: Anatomy and Physiology I and II.
This course is a study of the basic physiological and biochemical activities of bacteria and viruses. Emphasis will be placed on virulence factors and the mechanism by which a variety of microorganisms and viruses establish an infection. The use of anti-viral drugs and antibiotics, the host immune response to microbial infection, and the effectiveness of various vaccination strategies will also be discussed.
June 23–July 10, M T W TH, 1:00-4:00 p.m.
Chris Reisch & Noreen Lyle

BIOL 221001  Microbiology for Health Professionals Laboratory
Exercises in this laboratory course deal with aseptic techniques, microbial cultivation and growth characteristics, staining and bacterial isolation techniques, differential biochemical tests, identification of unknown bacterial species, and testing effectiveness of antimicrobial agents.
June 23–July 10, M T W TH, 4:00-6:30 p.m.
Holli Rowedder



CHEMISTRY

CHEM 110901  General Chemistry I

This course is intended for students whose major interest is science or medicine. It offers a rigorous introduction to the principles of chemistry with special emphasis on quantitative relationships and chemical equilibrium and the structures of atoms, molecules, and crystals. The properties of the more common elements and compounds are considered against a background of these principles and the periodic table.
June 16–July 7, M T W TH F, 8:30-11:15 a.m.
William Griffin

CHEM 111101  General Chemistry Laboratory I
Experiments in these lab courses reflect and apply the principles learned in CHEM1109 and CHEM 1110. Students will be introduced to techniques and procedures commonly used in chemistry labs and develop skills for acquiring and analyzing data.
June 16–July 3 M T W TH, 11:45 a.m.-2:45 p.m.
William Griffin

CHEM 111001  General Chemistry II
This course is intended for students whose major interest is science or medicine. It offers a rigorous introduction to the principles of chemistry with special emphasis on quantitative relationships, chemical equilibrium, and the structures of atoms, molecules, and crystals. The properties of the more common elements and compounds are considered against a background of these principles and the periodic table.
July 8–Aug 1, T W F M, 8:30-11:15 a.m.
William Griffin


CHEM 111201  General Chemistry Laboratory II
Experiments in these lab courses reflect and apply the principles learned in CHEM1109 and CHEM 1110. Students will be introduced to techniques and procedures commonly used in chemistry labs and develop skills for acquiring and analyzing data.
July 7–July 30, M T W, 11:45 a.m.-2:45 p.m.
William Griffin


CHEM 223101  Organic Chemistry I
An introduction to the chemistry, properties, and uses of organic compounds. The correlation of structure with properties, reaction mechanisms, and the modern approach to structural and synthetic problems are stressed throughout. In the laboratory, the aim is acquisition of sound experimental techniques through the synthesis of selected compounds.
June 16–July 8, M T TH F, 9:30-12 noon
Mel Govindan


CHEM 223301  Organic Chemistry Laboratory I
Students will acquire fundamental organic lab techniques in the context of principles learned in CHEM2231 and CHEM2232. Reactions that are studied in class will be performed in the laboratory.
June 16–July 8, M T TH, 12:30-4:30 p.m.
Mel Govindan


CHEM 223201  Organic Chemistry II
An introduction to the chemistry, properties, and uses of organic compounds. The correlation of structure with properties and reaction mechanisms and the modern approach to structural and synthetic problems are stressed throughout. In the laboratory, the aim is acquisition of sound experimental techniques through the synthesis of selected compounds.
July 10–Aug 1, TH F M T, 9:30-12 noon
Mel Govindan

CHEM 223401  Organic Chemistry Laboratory II
Students will acquire fundamental organic lab techniques in the context of principles learned in CHEM2231 and CHEM2232. Reactions that are studied in class will be performed in the laboratory.
July 10–July 31, TH M T, 12:30-4:30 p.m.
Mel Govindan



COMMUNICATION
 
COMM 1030  Public Speaking
This course is an introduction to the theory, composition, delivery, and criticism of speeches. Attention is devoted to the four key elements of the speech situation: message, speaker, audience, and occasion. Emphasis in the course is also given to different modes of speaking and a variety of speech types, such as persuasive, ceremonial, and expository addresses. This is a performance course.
COMM 103001  May 14–June 18, M W 6:00-9:15 p.m.
No Class Monday May 12; Meets on Friday May 16
No Class Memorial Day; Meets on Friday May 30
Joyce Lindmark
COMM 103002  June 23–July 30, M W, 6:00-9:15 p.m.
Robert Rosenthal

COMM 223201  Topics in Intercultural Communication
This course will explore the challenges individuals and institutions often face when they attempt to communicate across cultural barriers, with particular emphasis on obstacles posed by ideological constructions of difference such as race, ethnicity, nationality, gender, and sexuality. We will cultivate a critical perspective on relevant conflicts and controversies using the theoretical resources offered by the field of media and cultural studies. Our aim is to foster both greater understanding of potential impediments to humane cross-cultural communication, and more sophisticated strategies of intervention.
May 14–June 18, M W 6:00-9:15 p.m.
No Class Monday May 12; Meets on Friday May 16
No Class Memorial Day; Meets on Friday May 30
Brett Ingram

COMM 227801  Social Media
This course examines the cultural, economic and political aspects of emerging computer-mediated communication technologies known as “social media,” including Facebook, Twitter, YouTube, Instagram and more. Students will critically interrogate the impact of social media on relationships, identity, social/political movements, branding/marketing, and everyday practices. Course will also cover practical social media skills with assignments and activities involving hands-on experience using social media technologies to create and distribute content.
May 13–June 19, T TH, 6:00-9:15 p.m.
Lindsay Hogan


COMM 444901  Crisis Communication
This course is designed to examine events and situations that potentially threaten the viability of an organization. Attention is devoted to developing an effective crisis communication plan, speaking to multiple stakeholders, decision-making under pressure, and resolving–rather than litigating–organizational problems. Among the studies examined are the Tylenol product tampering incident, the Exxon Valdez accident, the Union Carbide gas leak, the Challenger Space Shuttle disaster, the Three Mile Island accident, and the Pepsi syringe hoax.
June 23–July 30, M W, 6:00-9:15 p.m.
Donald Fishman




EARTH AND ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCES

EESC 114001  Our Mobile Earth
Introduction to the structure of the earth and the dynamic processes that continuously shape and remodel its surface. Course discusses the formation and evolution of the oceans and continents within the framework of the modern theory of plate tectonics. The locations, causes and effects of earthquakes and volcanoes are presented. The dynamics within the earth which drive the tectonic plates are outlined.
May 14–June 18, M W, 6:00-9:15 p.m.
No Class Monday May 12; Meets on Friday May 16
No Class Memorial Day; Meets on Friday May 30
Robert Buchwaldt


EESC 116301  Environmental Issues and Resources
Hands-on introduction to topographic and geologic map interpretation through assessment of environmental problems such as slope failure, flooding, groundwater pollution, and land-use planning. Modeling of earthquake activity with a sliding-block earthquake-generating apparatus. Each class period is divided into a short lecture followed by hands-on activities. In-class lab exercises help to make a direct connection between geologic principles and common practices. Active learning is encouraged within a supportive environment.
June 24–July 31, T TH, 6:00-9:15 p.m.
Kenneth Galli




ECONOMICS

ECON 113101  Principles of Economics I — Micro
This course is an analysis of prices, output, and income distribution through the interaction of households and business firms in a modern Western economy. The appropriate role of government intervention is examined, and basic analytical tools are applied to current economic problems.
June 24–July 31, T TH, 6:00-9:15 p.m.
Sylvia Hristakeva


ECON 1132  Principles of Economics II — Macro
This course is an analysis of national income and employment, economic fluctuations, monetary and fiscal policy, inflation, growth, and international aspects of macroeconomic policy.
ECON 113201  May 13–June 19, T TH, 6:00-9:15 p.m.
Jinghan Cai
ECON 113202  June 23–July 30, M W, 6:00-9:15 p.m.
Rossella Calvi


ECON 115101  Statistics
This course is focused on probability, random variables, sampling distributions, estimation of parameters, tests of hypotheses, regression, and forecasting.
This course does not satisfy the Statistics requirement for Boston College Arts & Sciences Economics majors.
May 14–June 18, M W, 6:00-9:15 p.m.
No Class Monday May 12; Meets on Friday May 16
No Class Memorial Day; Meets on Friday May 30
Bertan Turhan


ECON 336501  Public Finance
Prequisite: Microeconomic Threory
This is a course in the microeconomics of the public sector. We will discuss the rationale for the government's role in a market economy, major expenditure programs, and the theory and structure of the tax system. The focus will be on the federal (as opposed to state and local) government's expenditure and tax programs, with special attention given to topics of current concern.
June 24–July 31, T TH, 6:00-9:15 p.m.
Mark Kazarosian


ECON 336101  Monetary Theory and Policy
Prerequisite: Macroeconomic Theory
An analysis of the operation and behavior of financial markets and financial institutions. Emphasis is placed on financial intermediaries, including commercial banks and the central bank. The money supply process and alternative theories of the demand for money are considered, as well as their implications for monetary policies and macroeconomic performance.
June 23–July 30, M W, 6:30-9:45 p.m.
Hossein S. Kazemi.




ENGLISH

Writing

ENGL 1010  First Year Writing Seminar
ENGL 101001 - Prof. DeFusco

Designed as a workshop in which each student develops a portfolio of personal and academic writing, the seminar follows a course-long process. Students write and rewrite essays continuously, discuss their works-in-progress in class, and receive feedback during individual and small group conferences with the instructor. Students read a wide range of texts, including various forms of non-fiction prose. In addition to regular conferences, the class meets twice a week to discuss the writing process, the relationship between reading and writing, conventional and innovative ways of doing research, and evolving drafts of class members.
ENGL 101001  May 14–June 18, M W, 6:00-9:15 p.m.
No Class Monday May 12; Meets on Friday May 16
No Class Memorial Day; Meets on Friday May 30
Lecturer Andrea Defusco, A.M.
ENGL 101002  June 23–July 30, M W, 8:15-11:30 a.m.
The Department



LITERATURE

ENGL 1080  Literature Core
In Literature Core, students explore the principal motives which prompt people to read literature: to assemble and assess the shape and values of one's own culture, to discover alternative ways of looking at the world, to gain insight into issues of permanent human importance as well as issues of contemporary urgency, and to enjoy the linguistic and formal satisfactions of literary art. Literature Core will strive to develop the student's capacity to read and write with clarity and engagement, to allow for that dialogue between the past and present we call history, and to provide an introduction to literary genres.
ENGL 108001  May 13–June 19, T TH, 6:00-9:15 p.m.
The Department
ENGL 108002  June 23–July 30, M W, 6:00-9:15 p.m.
Robert Farrell, S.J.


ADEN 142501  American Popular Literature
Certain formulas continue to produce books that millions of Americans read for pleasure: mysteries, romances, spy thrillers, detective stories, westerns, science fiction. Are these books trash or art? How can readers determine their significance? This course raises questions about literature, culture and society, and considers whether critical methods used to read "great books" can help interpret popular literature. Works include Louis L'Amour, The Burning Hills; Thomas Harris, The Silence of the Lambs; Robert B. Parker, Early Autumn; Danielle Steel, Zoya, and others.
May 13–June 19, T TH 6:00–9:15 p.m.
Robert Farrell, S.J.



FILM

FILM 228301  History of European Cinema
Using a survey approach, the course examines the principal movements of Expressionism in Germany, Neo-realism in Italy, and the New Wave in France with an occasional maverick film that becomes monumental in the history of cinema.
May 14–June 18, M W, 6:00-9:15 p.m.
No Class Monday May 12; Meets on Friday May 16
No Class Memorial Day; Meets on Friday May 30
John Michalczyk


FILM 338301  Film Criticism and Theory
In essence, we become film critics when we explore our opinions about a film in light of the plot, characterization, dramatic tension, etc. As an art form, film criticism emerged on a large scale following release of the controversial film Birth of a Nation (1915). Today film critiques are found in our daily newspapers and weekly journals. This course will continue the process through the screening and discussion of primarily independent films. Students will read extensive critiques and theory, while developing sharp critical and writing skills.
June 23–July 30, M W, 6:00-9:15 p.m.
John Michalczyk



FINANCE  / MANAGEMENT

ADFN 202101  Basic Finance
Prerequisite: Financial Accounting or equivalent.
This course introduces financial markets and how they work or crash (as in 2008). It examines how corporations raise capital in the financial markets and decide upon its deployment in the enterprise. Topics treated extensively include the time value of money, valuing bonds, valuing stocks, risk/return/risk management, capital budgeting, financial analysis of corporations, working capital management and international financial management.
June 23–July 30, M W, 6:00-9:15 p.m.
Vincent Starck

ADBM 105201  Introduction to Organizational Behavior
To thrive in constantly transforming organizations, it is important to understand the factors which influence performance and satisfaction, and the dynamics critical to interacting with and managing others effectively. Course considers how personality, motivation, communication, leadership style, technology, conflict, organizational culture and power affect productivity and personal and professional success.
June 24–July 31, T TH, 6:00-9:15 p.m.
Robert Anzenberger




HISTORY

ADHS 115201  Politics of Democracy: The West, the World, and the Coming of Democracy Since 1789
This course examines the ways in which Democracy became the established political form for many nations, particularly those in the West, after the French Revolution. After the upheavals of the American and French
Revolutions, Democracy, and its economic counterpart, Capitalism, became the accepted norms for many countries of the world. In this course, we will investigate the processes which allowed this political and economic transformation to take place. The course will look at the French and Industrial Revolutions; imperialism; the World Wars of the twentieth century; and the resurgence of nationalism in the twenty-first century. Throughout the course, issues of class, race, gender, and ethnicity will be to the fore, as we strive to discover how the world came to be as it is today.
May 13–June 19, T TH, 6:00-9:15 p.m.
Michael Paul


HIST 102701  Modern History I: Political and Cultural History of Modernism
This is the first of two courses that survey the historical development of Europe from the Renaissance to the present, with the intention of explaining how the unique Western society in which we live today came into being. The great expansion of European power and culture since 1500 has made the development of Europe a key to understanding the modern world as a whole. Particular emphasis is placed on political, diplomatic, and cultural factors, but social, economic and religious aspects are also covered. This course will cover the period from the Renaissance through the French Revolution.
May 14–June 18, M W, 6:00-9:15 p.m.
No Class Monday May 12; Meets on Friday May 16
No Class Memorial Day; Meets on Friday May 30
Martin Menke


HIST 103901  The West and the World: 1500-1789
The past five hundred years witnessed the rise to power and prosperity of Western societies. This course examines the significance of the beginning of global relationships. Includes issues in early modern European history, as well as early exploration, the colonization of America, the African slave trade and the Atlantic economic dependency.
June 24–July 31, T TH, 6:00-9:15 p.m.
Karen Miller


HIST 242101  American Presidency
This course examines the single most important position of power in our political system, the men who shaped it, and the elections that placed them in that office. Although the course begins with the drafting of the Constitution, the focus is on the twentieth century.
June 24–July 31, T TH, 8:30-11:45 a.m.
Mark Gelfand


HIST 283001  History of Boston’s Neighborhoods
An historical look at Boston explores parts of its “neighborhoods,” including the old West End, the South End, the North End, South Boston, East Boston, Charlestown, Dorchester, Roxbury, Jamaica Plain, Mattapan, Hyde Park, and West Roxbury. Walking and bus tours are planned
during the regular class meetings.
May 15–June 19, M TH, 6:00-9:15 p.m.
No Class Monday May 12; Meets on Friday May 16
No Class Memorial Day; Meets on Friday May 30
Chris Hannan


HIST 283101  Modern America: 1945 to the Present
An investigation of America since World War II. Topics include the Cold War, McCarthyism, Civil Rights, Vietnam, the women’s movement, the Reagan years and life in the 1980’s, 1990’s to the present.
June 23–July 30, M W, 8:30-11:45 a.m.
Alex Bloom


HIST 284701  The Americas: A History from 1492-2012
On the eve of discovery of the Americas, Mexico and South America boasted the most complex and productive economies and governments in all the Americas. Throughout the colonial period, these regions continued to produce the most money and attract the most colonists. However, things changed. Today the United States and Canada possess a success and stability in government and economy largely absent in other American countries. Why and when did this change occur? This course attempts to answer those questions.
May 13–June 19, T TH, 6:00-9:15 p.m.
Mark Christensen



Independent Study
Students who wish to pursue a specific academic interest that is not part of the regularly scheduled summer program should consider Independent Study. Interested students must select a member of the Boston College faculty willing to supervise the readings, research, projects or any of the
various possible forms of independent work. Written authorization from the undergraduate dean is necessary. Registration for independent study is always completed in McGuinn 100. Tuition remission is not applicable to readings and research or any form of independent study.



INFORMATION SYSTEMS

Courses listed below are open ONLY to students enrolled in a Boston College degree program.

ADIT 134101  Web 2.0: New Era of Web Technology
Immersive courses bring a new wave of exciting websites and technologies (such as Facebook, YouTube, Virtual Worlds) into the “Web 2.0” era. Rich and interactive forms of communication, collaboration, and socialization are the heart of Web 2.0, but the price is high: privacy breaches, identity theft, cyber-stalkers and addiction are a few issues that become more complicated in the Web 2.0 world. In this unique online course students learn how to harness the power of Web 2.0 while protecting themselves and others. Hands-on experience with social networks, online photo and video sharing, virtual worlds, wikis, blogging, mashups and more. No auditors.
May 13–June 19, T TH, 6:00-9:15 p.m.
Barbara Mikolajczak


ADIT 134901  Information Systems: Collaborative Computing
Prerequisite: Facile knowledge of spreadsheets, word processing, data management, graphics, and the Internet.
An immersive education course.
This immersive education course extends knowledge and improves skills in the use of industry standard business software, supplemented with a detailed overview of server and workstation hardware. Students explore the collaborative use of versatile and powerful state-of-the-art applications. Topics include proprietary and open source operating systems, word processing, spreadsheet and presentational applications, hardware interfaces, backup schematics, network applications and protocols, including SSH, HTTP, FTP, DNS, POP3/IMAP Mail Transfer Agents, and client/server remote connect applications, web publishing, compression utilities, collaborative document concepts, and the design and structure of data files. No auditors.
June 23–July 30, M W, 6:00-9:15 p.m.
Constantine Hantzis


ADIT 135101  Discovering Computer Graphics
Prerequisite: Comfortable using Microsoft Windows operating system.
An immersive education course.
Discover the joy of computer graphics. Learn how to create your own multimedia greeting cards; customize and enhance digital photos; design and create animated music videos; enhance business presentations and reports. Using collaborative and immersive software, experiment with 3D technology by playing interactive games and exploring virtual reality worlds. With a focus on graphics for the Internet and the Web, students learn related terminology and concepts as they gain valuable hands-on skills. Presents a variety of graphics authoring tools, viewers, and formats while exploring fundamentals of two dimensional (2D) graphics, three dimensional (3D) graphics, Virtual Reality (VR),
animation, games, interactive graphics, streaming media, and interactive television. Hands-on experience includes Photoshop, Flash, Shockwave, Powerpoint, YouTube, Virtual Worlds, Audio Whiteboard, Word, Media Player, QuickTime, IPIX, SVG, MPEG, MP3, and more. No auditors.
June 24–July 31, T TH, 6:00-9:15 p.m.
Aaron Walsh




JOURNALISM

ADJO 223001  News Writing
Since the art of communication prospers only when we fully realize the power of words, this course is designed to expand your powers of expression, both written and verbal. We will explore what some great communicators (Lincoln, Churchill, William Faulkner, Martin Luther King, Joan Didion, John Updike, others) have to teach us about precise expression. We will also glean lessons from such contemporary sources as journalism (the daily newspaper), narrative nonfiction (magazines and books), arts criticism (movies, music, theater), the advertising industry, and the blogosphere. A further goal of the course is to help students develop a large and vital vocabulary, and an understanding of usage, that will enable them to write and speak with precision.
May 14–June 18, M W 6:00-9:15 p.m.
No Class Monday May 12; Meets on Friday May 16
No Class Memorial Day; Meets on Friday May 30
Don Aucoin


ADJO 334901  Politics and the Media: Power and Influence
An analysis of mass media’s impact on the workings of the American system. The media’s interaction and influence on political institutions, on the presidential selection process, on national and international events, on office holders, politicians, heads of state and the treatment of economic upheaval and violence are analyzed. Considers the media’s role in the coverage of war, especially in a terrorist world.
June 23–July 30, M W, 6:00-9:15 p.m.
Marie Natoli




LANGUAGES AND LITERATURE

FRENCH LITERATURE IN ENGLISH
RLRL 116301  Boston’s French Connection

(All in English)
Students will explore the following topics: early French explorers and the Acadian experience, Boston’s Puritans and French Huguenots, the American and French Revolutions, French influences on Boston’s Catholics and Unitarian Transcendentalists, French influences on Boston’s musicians, painters, sculptors, architects, politicians and writers, and contributions of the different Francophone peoples in Boston. Students will develop skill in analyzing historical and literary texts and will examine closely passages in Alexis de Tocqueville’s "Democracy in America" and Simone de Beauvoir’s "America Day by Day".
June 24–July 31, T TH, 6:00-9:15 p.m.
James Flagg


FRENCH

FREN 110901  Intermediate French I

The emphasis will be on building upon prior study and developing a practical knowledge of the French language, as spoken by native speakers in contemporary France. Our goal is to help students develop oral and written proficiency in the language. The emphasis is on contemporary French culture and history, vocabulary expansion, accuracy of expression, and interactive language use. Short literary and cultural readings will provide authentic insight. Classroom work will be supplemented with web-based assignments and an online audio program.
June 23–July 10, M T W TH, 6:00-9:15 p.m.
Sarah Bilodeau


FREN 111001  Intermediate French II
This course is a continuation of FREN1109 (Intermediate French I) and is also open to students who have placed into this course. Students will continue to expand their vocabulary and develop their fluency, both written and oral. Emphasis is on active student participation and a broadening of historical and cultural knowledge. Francophone culture will be explored through literary excerpts by authors from France, Africa, and the Caribbean. Classroom work will be supplemented with film, web-based assignments and an online audio program.
July 14–July 31, M T W TH, 6:00-9:15 p.m.
Andrea Javel


SPANISH

SPAN 100501  Intensive Beginning Spanish I

This two-course sequence covers in six weeks the first and second semesters of a full-year elementary Spanish course. A practical knowledge of the Spanish language as spoken by native speakers will be developed in five areas: listening, speaking, reading, writing, and cultural competence. Specific objectives include attaining at least a novice high level of oral proficiency. Because this is an intensive course, daily homework assignments, regular attendance and class participation are essential.
June 23–July 10, M T W TH, 6:00-9:15 p.m.
Christopher Wood


SPAN 100601  Intensive Beginning Spanish II
You will begin to narrate personal and objective experiences using past tenses and to express needs, advice, doubts and opinions through the use of the subjunctive mood.
July 14–July 31, M T W TH, 6:00-9:15 p.m.
Christopher Wood


SPAN 101501  Elementary Spanish I
This beginning course is designed for students with no prior Spanish experience as well as those who have had some high school Spanish and are not sufficiently prepared for intermediate level work. Emphasis is on building oral and written communication skills and acquiring a greater
awareness of the Hispanic world. Class instruction is
supplemented by videos and CD-ROM and web activities.
June 23–July 10, M T W TH, 6:00-9:15 p.m.
Nilza Gonzalez-Pedemonte


SPAN 101601 Elementary Spanish II
This course is a continuation of SPAN1015. Course goals include readying students for Intermediate Spanish, expanding vocabulary, and building oral proficiency. Students will deepen their understanding of Hispanic culture through short literary and cultural readings, videos, and films. Emphasis is on building oral and written communication skills and on acquiring a greater awareness of the Spanish-speaking world.
July 14–July 31, M T W TH, 6:00-9:15 p.m.
Nilza Gonzalez-Pedemonte


SPAN 111501 Intermediate Spanish I
This course builds on previously acquired language skills and helps prepare students to interact with native speakers of Spanish. Emphasis is on vocabulary expansion, accuracy of expression, and interactive language use. Short literary and cultural readings will provide authentic insight into the Hispanic world. Students will have the opportunity to work with videos, films, the internet, and other multimedia materials.
June 23–July 10, M T W TH, 6:00-9:15 p.m.
Karen Daggett


SPAN 111601 Intermediate Spanish II
This course is a continuation of SPAN1115. Students will expand their vocabulary and develop written and oral fluency. Emphasis is on active student participation and broadening historical and cultural knowledge. Short literary and cultural readings will provide authentic insight into
the Hispanic world. Students will have the opportunity to work with videos, films, the internet, and other multimedia materials.
July 14–July 31, M T W TH, 6:00-9:15 p.m.
Sheila McIntosh



MARKETING

ADMK 102101  Basic Marketing

Overview of activities involved in marketing including appraisal and diagnosis, organization and planning, and action and control of all elements of marketing. Specifically considers the products, functions and service mix, distribution mix, communication and pricing mix.
May 14–June 18, M W, 6:00-9:15 p.m.
No Class Monday May 12; Meets on Friday May 16
No Class Memorial Day; Meets on Friday May 30
Nicholas Nugent



MATHEMATICS

MATH 1004  Finite Probability
MATH100401 Syllabus - Prof. Mirollo

Survey of applied finite probability including finite sets and partitions, enumeration, sample spaces, expectation and random variables. Also brief introduction to statistics.
MATH 100401 June 23–July 30, M W, 6:00-9:15 p.m.
Rennie Mirollo
MATH 100402 June 24–July 31, T TH, 8:30-11:45 a.m.
Ned Rosen


MATH  110001  Calculus I
Prerequisite: Trigonometry
MATH1100 is a first course in the calculus of one variable intended for biology, computer science, economics, management, and premedical students. It is open to others who are qualified and desire a more rigorous mathematics course at the core level. Topics include a brief review of polynomials and trigonometric, exponential, and logarithmic functions, followed by discussion of limits, derivatives, and applications of differential calculus to real-world problem areas. The course concludes with an introduction to integration.
May 13–June 19, T TH, 6:00-9:15 p.m.
John Aversa


MATH 110101  Calculus II
MATH1101 is a second course in the calculus of one variable intended for biology, computer science, economics, management, and premedical students. It is open to others who are qualified and desire a more rigorous mathematics course at the core level. Topics include an overview of integration, basic techniques for integration, a variety of applications of integration, and an introduction to (systems of) differential equations.
June 24–July 31, T TH, 6:00-9:15 p.m.
John Aversa

MATH 3353  Statistics
Introductory course in inferential statistics covering the description of sample data, probability, the binomial and normal distribution, random sampling, estimation and hypothesis-testing. Designed for students in business, nursing and the social sciences.
MATH 335301 May 15–June 20, M TH, 6:00-9:15 p.m.
No Class Monday May 12; Meets on Friday May 16
No Class Memorial Day; Meets on Friday May 30
Marie Clote
MATH 335302 June 23–July 30, M W, 6:00-9:15 p.m.
Dan Chambers




PHILOSOPHY

PHIL 1005  Introduction to Basic Problems of Philosophy

This course introduces students to the problems and procedures of the Western philosophical tradition. Examines selected works of such key thinkers as Plato, Aristotle, St. Augustine, Descartes, Locke and Rousseau.
PHIL100501, May 13–June 19, T TH, 6:00-9:15 p.m.
The Department
PHIL100502, June 24–July 31, T TH, 6:00-9:15 p.m.
The Department


PHIL 108801  Person and Social Responsibility I
In light of classic philosophical and theological texts, students in this course address the relationship of self and society, the nature of community, the mystery of suffering and the practical difficulties of developing a just society. PULSE students are challenged to investigate the insights offered by their readings in relationship to their service work.
Places in the course are very limited.
May 13–June 20, M TH, 6:30-9:30 p.m.
No Class Monday May 12; Meets on Friday May 16
No Class Memorial Day; Meets on Friday May 30
Brian Becker


PHIL 222001  Miracles, Angels, Ghosts and Demons
Using philosophical reasoning, theological faith and popular experience, course explores the questions: Do miracles still happen? Are angels myths or realities? How would you know one if you met one?  Can you become demon possessed? Was “The Exorcist” fact or fiction? Why are we fascinated with ghost stories? What difference does it make if we actually encounter the supernatural? Has the Blessed Virgin Mary spoken at Lourdes and Fatima and still today at Medjugorje?
May 14–June 18, M W, 6:00–9:15 p.m.
No Class Monday May 12; Meets on Friday May 16
No Class Memorial Day; Meets on Friday May 30
Peter Kreeft


PHIL 228501  The American Dream: A Philosophical Investigation
What does it mean to be an American in the 21st century, in the post-September 11th climate? How do we structure our society, how do we live together as neighbors, how do we adapt to the new realities? Students will emerge with greater knowledge about and curiosity concerning the social, economic, political, cultural and psychological processes that shape contemporary definitions of the self and identity and that contribute to the formation of behaviors in the 21st century. Through film, literature, and contemporary scholarship, the course surveys and engages some key concepts in Americans’ ways of life: their roots, their developments, the tension between them and the impact of a changing world. The course examines terms like freedom and equality, rights and obligations, liberal and conservative, security and fear, individual and community  and uses them for assessment and understanding.
June 23–July 30, M W, 6:00–9:15 p.m.
Hessam Dehghani




PHYSICS

PHYS 210001  Introduction to Physics I (Calculus)

Prerequisite: Calculus I; may be taken concurrently.
First session of a two-session calculus-based introduction to physics primarily for biology majors and premedical students. The development and application of classical physical principles are covered, and students are introduced to more advanced mathematical techniques to extend these applications. Emphasis is placed on problem-solving to better understand the implications of these principles, as well as to develop analytical skills. Topics include classical mechanics, including Newton's laws, energy, rotational motion, hydrostatics and fluid dynamics, oscillations, waves, and gravitation.
June 2–June 26, M T TH, 6:00-9:30 p.m.
Jan Engelbrecht


PHYS 205001  Introductory Physics Laboratory I
A laboratory course that provides an opportunity to perform experiments on topics in mechanics and acoustics.This lab meets three times per week. This lab is intended for students in PHYS2100/2101.
June 2–June 26, M W TH, 4:00-5:50 p.m.
Jan Engelbrecht


PHYS 210101  Introduction to Physics II  (Calculus)
Second session of a calculus-based introduction to physics primarily for biology majors and premedical students. The development and application of classical physical principles are covered, and students are introduced to more advanced mathematical techniques to extend these applications. Emphasis is placed on problem-solving to better understand the implications of these principles, as well as to develop analytical skills. Topics are electrostatics, electrical circuits, magnetism, electromagnetism and electromagnetic waves,  topics in physical optics, and basic concepts of special relativity and quantum physics.
June 30–July 24, M T TH, 6:00-9:30 p.m.
Jan Engelbrecht


PHYS 205101  Introductory Physics Laboratory II
A laboratory course that provides an opportunity to perform experiments on topics in electricity and magnetism and physical optics. This lab meets three times per week  This lab is intended for students in PHYS2100/2101.
June 30–July 24, M W TH, 4-5:50 p.m.
Jan Engelbrecht




POLITICAL SCIENCE

POLI 104101  Fundamental Concepts of Politics

This is an introduction to the study of politics through a consideration of some of the basic elements associated with governing: the political association, justice, constitutions, equality, liberty, conflict among citizens and between citizens and governments, conflict among governments. Each of the course instructors uses a different set of readings, drawing on a mix of political philosophy texts, works on international politics, novels, biographies. Emphasis is on interesting and important readings, discussion, and writing.
May 14–June 18, M W, 6:00-9:15 p.m.
No Class Monday May 12; Meets on Friday May 16
No Class Memorial Day; Meets on Friday May 30
The Department


POLI 106101  Indroduction to American Politics
An overview of contemporary American government and politics focusing on how the institutions envisioned by the Framers of the Constitution (Congress, the judiciary, the executive) function today. Particular emphasis will be placed on how developments since the 1960s have affected the interaction of national, state, and local governmental actors, political participation, the articulation of interests, and policy formulation and implementation. Topics covered will include the media, public interest and advocacy organizations, campaign technologies and consultants, and public policy research institutes (think tanks). Whenever possible, comparisons between the U.S. and other advanced industrial democracies will be explored.
June 23–July 30, M W, 6:00-9:15 p.m.
Farah DiPasquale


POLI 352701  Seminar: Terrorism and Political Violence
Terrorism and insurgency dominate the headlines today, but how much do we really know about these forms of political violence? Are they inventions from the modern era, or do they have a deeper past? What drives an individual to join an armed group? Why do some groups choose to employ violence, while others do not? Are terrorism and insurgency effective political tactics? Just how significant is the threat of terrorism? This course will address these and other questions, while introducing students to relevant analytical frameworks, theories, and cases concerning terrorism, insurgency, and related forms of political violence.
June 24–July 31, T TH, 6:00-9:15 p.m.
Peter Krause




PSYCHOLOGY

PSYC  111101  Introduction to Psychology as a Social Science

This course is one of two introductory courses required for Psychology majors, along with PS1110. This course introduces students to the basic questions, perspectives, and methods that characterize the fields of developmental, social, cultural, personality, and clinical psychology.
June 23–July 30, M W, 8:15-11:30 a.m.
Janice D’Avignon


PSYC 224201  Personality Theories
This course introduces students to a variety of theoretical approaches to the understanding of character and personality.
June 24–July 31, T TH, 8:15-11:30 a.m.
Donnah Canavan

PSYC 226801  Psychological Development Through the Life Span
Introduces the issues underlying the developmental process: infant knowledge, the nature of human attachment, separation, male and female differences, the meaning of adulthood, the interaction of physiological and psychological processes and the predictability of human development.
June 24–July 31, T TH, 6:00-9:15 p.m.
Michael Moore


PSYC 228101  Sports Psychology
A survey of the field of sport psychology with emphasis on the role of athletics throughout the life cycle. Examines the recent trend of increased participation by children in organized sports at earlier ages, the impact of parental dynamics, the growing interest in continuing athletic participation over the life cycle, the economic and social expectations and their implications for psychological development. Discusses issues addressed by sport psychologists including those relating to performance, stress and self esteem.
May 13–June 19, T TH, 6:00-9:15 p.m.
Michael Moore



SOCIOLOGY

SOCY 100101  Introductory Sociology

This course presents the basics of sociology. It conveys a sense of the history of sociology, how research is conducted, and various theoretical approaches to the field. Attention is given both to micro-level (interpersonal) and macro-level (organizational) behavior. Special topics may include interaction in everyday life, sociology of the family and gender roles, education, race and ethnic relations, and sociology of work and occupations, among others. One of the major goals of the course is to enable students to ground themselves and their families sociologically, by examining their own community and social class origins.
May 14–June 18, M W, 6:00–9:15 p.m.
The Department


SOCY 104901  Social Problems
This course is an exploration of different sociological approaches to the study of social problems and social trends in contemporary society. It examines the linkages between social structures/institutions, culture and human experience. The course emphasizes theoretical research issues, especially how, and to what degree, the understanding of social problems are a direct result of the processes used to define social problems as well as the research methods and procedures used to investigate them. Students will learn to critique popular discourses from a critical sociological perspective and will be encouraged to form their own opinions and critiques.
June 24–July 31, T TH, 6:00-9:15 p.m.
The Department




THEOLOGY

THEO 100101  Biblical Heritage I

An introduction to the literature, religious ideas and historical setting of the Hebrew Bible. Focus is on major biblical concepts such as creation, election and covenant in the Pentateuch, historical and prophetic books.
May 13–June 19, T TH, 6:00-9:15 p.m.
John Darr


THEO 100201  Biblical Heritage II
The Bible has been an influential and often fundamental source for many modern, Western views of God, nature, human beings, a just society, and the origin and destiny of humanity and the world. An intelligent, serious reading of the Bible raises most of the perennial questions that have traditionally stood at the center of philosophical and theological debate. Thus, a thorough analysis of Biblical texts in terms of the central concerns of the Core curriculum will be the primary goal of the Biblical Heritage course.
June 24–July 31, T TH, 6:00-9:15 p.m.
John Darr


THEO 101601  Introduction to Christian Theology I
This is the first session of a two-part course that fulfills the Theology core requirement. This sequence of courses considers significant questions in conversation with some of the most important writings in the tradition of Western Christian thought. Its purpose is to encourage students by drawing systematically on primary sources of historical significance to uncover the roots of the Christian faith and life and to delineate the values for which this tradition of faith stands. Students considering a minor course of study in the Faith, Peace, and Justice Program will find this course of special interest.
May 14–June 18, M W, 6:00–9:15 p.m.
No Class Monday May 12; Meets on Friday May 16.
No Class Memorial Day; Meets on Friday May 30.
The Department


THEO 101701  Introduction to Christian Theology II
This is the second session of a two-part course that fulfills the Theology core requirement.. This sequence of courses considers significant questions in conversation with some of the most important writings in the tradition of Western Christian thought. Its purpose is to encourage students by drawing systematically on primary sources of historical significance to uncover the roots of the Christian faith and life and to delineate the values for which this tradition of faith stands. Students considering a minor course of study in the Faith, Peace, and Justice Program will find this course of special interest.
Boston College students must obtain departmental permission before registering for this course.
June 23–July 30, M W, 6:00-9:15 p.m.
The Department

THEO 102301  Exploring Catholicism: Tradition and Transformation I
This course is the first session of a two-part exploration of the vision, beliefs, practices, and challenge of Catholicism. The first semester explores human existence as lived in the light of the Mystery of God and the gift of Jesus Christ. The second semester considers the Church as the people of God, gathered and sent forth in the Spirit; the sacraments as catalysts of ongoing transformation in Christ; and the challenge of the spiritual life today. Close analysis of passages from the Bible will be supplemented by readings from contemporary theologians, literary figures, and social commentators.
May 14–June 18, M W, 6:00–9:15 p.m.
No Class Monday May 12; Meets on Friday May 16
No Class Memorial Day; Meets on Friday May 30
Louis M. Petillo


THEO 102401  Exploring Catholicism: Tradition and Transformation II
This is the second session of a two-part course exploring the vision, beliefs, practices, and challenge of Catholicism. The first semester explores human existence lived in the light of the Mystery of God and the gift of Jesus Christ. The second semester considers the Church as the people of God, gathered and sent forth in the Spirit, the sacraments as catalysts of ongoing transformation in Christ, and the challenge of the spiritual life today. Close analysis of passages from the Bible will be supplemented by readings from contemporary theologians, literary figures, and social commentators. Boston College students must obtain departmental permission before registering for this course.
June 23–July 30, M W, 6:00-9:15 p.m.
Boyd Coolman

THEO 116101  The Religious Quest: Comparative Perspectives I
THEO116101 Syllabus
This is the first session of a two-part course exploring the individual and communal search for wisdom about human nature, the world, ultimate realities and God, secrets of love and death, enduring values to live by, and paths to spiritual maturity. Although each section is different, likely themes include symbols, myths, doctrines, rituals, holy texts, saints, comparisons and contrasts among traditions, relevance of classical religious traditions to issues in today's world, interreligious dialogue today, and religious diversity in the Boston area. Each section brings the Biblical and Christian tradition into conversation with at least one other religious tradition.
May 13–June 19, T TH, 6:00-9:15 p.m.
James Weiss


THEO 116201  The Religious Quest: Comparative Perspectives II
This is the second session of a two-part course exploring the individual and communal search for wisdom about human nature, the world, ultimate realities and God, and secrets of love and death, as well as enduring values to live by and paths to spiritual maturity. Although each section is different, likely themes include symbols, myths, doctrines, rituals, holy texts, saints, comparisons and contrasts between traditions, relevance of classical religious traditions to issues in today's world, interreligious dialogue today, and religious diversity in the Boston area. Each section brings the Biblical and Christian tradition into conversation with at least one other religious tradition.
Boston College students must obtain departmental permission before registering for this course.
June 24–July 31, T TH, 6:00-9:15 p.m.
The Department


UNIVERSITY COURSES

UNAS 224001  Public Relations
Course explores the techniques and media used to influence special publics including the news media, trade publications, advertising, local events and meetings. Students study successful examples of public relations campaigns and design their own. Attention is devoted to non-profit public relations, corporate problems and the relationship between management strategies and promotional objectives.
June 24–July 31, T TH, 6:00-9:15 p.m.
Donald Fishman