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Boston College Experience Program

BCE Course Offerings

courses available to bce students

Summer Session Classroom Locations


The Boston College Experience offers high school students the opportunity to enroll in classes at the undergraduate level, and determine possible areas of academic interest. BCE students will be in classes with current Boston College undergraduate students, students from other local schools, and adults enrolled in the Woods College of Advancing Studies. Through coursework and collaboration with their classmates, BCE students will find themselves building relationships and  gaining a sense of the challenges that undergraduate classes may present when they enter college.

 

How To Choose Courses

When choosing courses for BCE, there are several things to keep in mind. Once you have identified some courses you might be interested in taking over the course of the program, take a look at the times they are offered. Some will be offered on Mondays and Wednesdays, some on Tuesdays and Thursdays, and a few take place on Mondays through Thursdays. It is important to make sure that the courses you are signing up for are not taking place at the same time because you can't be in two places at once!

There are also some courses that must be taken sequentially over the course of the summer because one is the continuation of the other. For example, the French and Spanish language classes listed have parts one and divided into two parts that span the six-week program. These courses meet Mondays through Thursdays for the duration of BCE and will constitute the entire workload of a BCE student. Additionally, the courses "Molecules and Cells" & "Ecology and Evolution" must be taken together sequentially, as well as "Anatomy and Physiology I" & "Anatomy and Physiology II."

Lastly, all labs are optional. There are corresponding labs with the Biology courses listed but they are not required, only encouraged. Each lab is one extra credit hour, a cost of $714, and a lab fee of $195.

If you have any questions about the courses offered or the course selection process, please feel free to contact us at bce@bc.edu or call us at 617-552-3900.

 

Available Course Subjects:

Biology        Communications        Earth & Environmental Sciences     

Economics        English        Film        History        Journalism

Languages/Literature        Management        Mathematics        Philosophy       

Political Science
        Psychology        Sociology        Theology


"Writers in the Making" Courses

 

BIOLOGY

BIOL 200001 Molecules and Cells

Foundational course required for Biology majors that introduces students to living systems at the molecular and cellular level of organization. Topics introduced in this course include basic cellular biochemistry, gene regulation, cellular organization and metabolism, and cell signaling and genetics.
June 23–July 10, M T W TH, 8:15 - 11:30 a.m. Lecturer Linda Tanini, Ph.D.

BIOL 201001 Ecology and Evolution

Foundational course required for Biology majors with a focus on the ecology and resilience of living systems across all levels of spatial scales. Topics introduced in this course include evolution, population dynamics, behavioral ecology, ecosystems, coevolution, and human ecology.
July 14–Jul 31, M T W TH, 8:15 - 11:30 a.m. Professor Linda Tanini, Ph.D.

BIOL 210001 General Biology Laboratory I

The first semester of a twosemester introductory biology laboratory course designed for nonbiology majors preparing for graduate programs in health professions. This course teaches basic laboratory skills, including microscopy, spectrophotometry, analytical electrophoresis and molecular cloning. Students are introduced to the principles of experimental design, data analysis and data interpretation. Inquirybased activities include experiments in biochemistry, cell physiology and molecular biology.
June 23–July 10, M T W TH, 12:00 - 2:15 p.m. Lecturer Linda Tanini, Ph.D.

BIOL 211001 General Biology Laboratory II

The continuation of BIOL 2100. Inquiry-based activities include experiments in organismic biology, ecology, and field biology.
July 14–Jul 31, M T W TH, 12:00 - 2:15 p.m. Lecturer Linda Tanini, Ph.D.

*Molecules & Cells and Ecology & Evolution are two halves of a course sequence and must be taken together. Labs are optional but encouraged.

BIOL 130001 Anatomy and Physiology I

This course lays the foundation for the understanding of human anatomy and physiology. The first portion of the course covers cellular and molecular aspects of eukaryotic cell function: basic chemistry, macromolecules, cell structure, membrane transport, metabolism, gene expression, cell cycle control, and genetics. The course continues with the study of several organ systems. Beginning with the Integument, which is followed by the Skeletal and Muscular Systems, and ending this first semester with the Nervous System. The cellular and molecular basis for the functions of these systems is an integral element of this portion of the course.
June 23–July 10, M T W TH, 8:15 - 11:00 a.m. Professor Halpern, Ph.D.

BIOL 131001 Anatomy and Physiology Lab I

Laboratory exercises intended to familiarize students with the various structures and principles discussed in BIOL 1300 through the use of anatomical models, physiological experiments, and limited dissection.
June 23–July 9, M T W, 11:15 a.m. - 1:30 p.m. Professor TBD

BIOL 132001 Anatomy and Physiology II

This course is a continuation of BIOL 1300, with a primary emphasis on the physiology of the major body systems. Systems studied in this course include the sensory, endocrine, cardiovascular, lymphatic, immune, respiratory, digestive, urinary, and reproductive systems. While the physiological functions under normal conditions are emphasized, relevant disease or dysfunctional conditions are also discussed.
July 14–Jul 31, M T W TH, 8:10 - 11:00 a.m. Professor Halpern, Ph.D.

BIOL 133001 Anatomy and Physiology Lab II

A continuation of BIOL 1310.
July 14–July 30, M T W, 11:15 a.m. - 1:30 p.m. Professor Halpern

*Anatomy and Physiology I & II must be taken together and will be the only classes an individual BCE student will register for. Labs are optional but encouraged.

 

Communications

COMM 1030 Public Speaking        COURSE NOW CLOSED

This course is an introduction to the theory, composition, delivery, and criticism of speeches. Attention is devoted to the four key elements of the speech situation: message, speaker, audience, and occasion. Emphasis in the course is also given to different modes of speaking and a variety of speech types, such as persuasive, ceremonial, and expository addresses. This is a performance course.
June 23–July 30, M W, 6:00 - 9:15p.m. Visiting Professor Robert Rosenthal, Ph.D.

UNAS 224001 Public Relations

Course explores the techniques and media used to influence special publics including the news media, trade publications, advertising, local events and meetings. Students study successful examples of public relations campaigns and design their own. Attention is devoted to nonprofit public relations, corporate problems and the relationship between management strategies and promotional objectives.
June 24–July 31, T TH, 6:00 - 9:15 p.m. Associate Professor Donald Fishman, Ph.D.

 

Earth & Environmental Sciences

EESC 116301 Environmental Issues and Resources

Handson introduction to topographic and geologic map interpretation through assessment of environmental problems such as slope failure, flooding, groundwater pollution, and landuse planning. Modeling of earthquake activity with a slidingblock earthquakegenerating apparatus. Each class period is divided into a short lecture followed by handson activities. Inclass lab exercises help to make a direct c onnection between geologic principles and common practices. Active learning is encouraged within a supportive environment.
June 24–July 31, T TH, 6:00 - 9:15 p.m. Lecturer Kenneth Galli, Ph.D.

 

Economics

EC 113101  Principles of Economics: Micro

This course is an analysis of prices, output, and income distribution through the interaction of households and business firms in a modern Western economy. The appropriate role of government intervention is examined, and basic analytical tools are applied to current economic problems.
June 24–July 31, T TH, 6:00 - 9:15 p.m.  Sylvia Hristakeva

EC 113202  Principles of Economics: Macro

This course is an analysis of national income and employment, economic fluctuations, monetary and fiscal policy, inflation, growth, and international aspects of macroeconomic policy.
ECON 113202 June 23–July 30, M W, 6:00 - 9:15 p.m. Rosella Calvi

 

English

WRITING

ENGL 1010 First Year Writing Seminar        COURSE NOW CLOSED

Designed as a workshop in which each student develops a portfolio of personal and academic writing, the seminar follows a semesterlong process. Students write and rewrite essays continuously, discuss their worksinprogress in class, and receive feedback during individual and small group conferences with the instructor. Students read a wide range of texts, including various forms of nonfiction prose. In addition to regular conferences, the class meets two hours per week to discuss the writing process, the relationship between reading and writing, conventional and innovative ways of doing research, and evolving drafts of class members.
June 23–July 30, M W, 6:00 - 9:15 p.m. Professor TBD

TRADITION IN LITERATURE

ENGL 1080 Literature Core

In Literature Core, students explore the principal motives which prompt people to read literature: to assemble and assess the shape and values of one's own culture, to discover alternative ways of looking at the world, to gain insight into issues of permanent human importance as well as issues of contemporary urgency, and to enjoy the linguistic and formal satisfactions of literary art. Literature Core will strive to develop the student's capacity to read and write with clarity and engagement, to allow for that dialogue between the past and present we call history, and to provide an introduction to literary genres.
June 23–July 30, M W, 6:00 - 9:15 p.m. Professor Robert Farrell, S.J.

 

Courses for Writers in the Making:

(Note: Must be accepted into the "Writers in the Making" concentration to register for one of the following courses.)

ENGL100801  3 1 BCE: Writing & Reading

Reading and writing.  Chicken and egg.  Which came first, and which followed? This course will probe and encourage the inevitable connections between our reading and our own writing—and while we probably won’t answer the troubling chicken/egg question, we will think about the relationship between our reading and our writing—in fact, we will nurture that relationship through exercises and imitations, and, of course, by reading good stuff—lots of it.

We will read and write together. Stories, essays, poems, rants. Our experience as readers will impact the shape, direction, parameters, and intellectual daring of our writing. The readings will be short, and the writing you produce will be short as well.  Brief, but impactful! You will emerge from this course with a greater sense of style and substance.  And a full portfolio of short pieces of inspired writing. Plan on lots of writing, lots of play, dramatic readings, clever thinking, all while working in pairs, groups and as a friendly, supportive, and collaborative whole class.
June 23 - July 30, M W 1-4p.m. Prof. Eileen Donovan-Kranz

ENGL100601  3 1 BCE:  Short Fiction

How does one become a fiction writer? Where do you get your ideas, and how do you turn those ideas into short stories? This course is a fiction-writing workshop, which means that you’ll have the opportunity to write original short stories, share them with the class and revise them accordingly. We’ll also read stories by professional writers, some of whom you'll have the chance to meet in person. As the course proceeds, you’ ll gain an understanding of the short fiction form and learn how to sustain a writing practice which you can continue to cultivate long after the summer ends.
June 24 - July 31, T TH 1-4p.m. Prof. Chris Boucher

ENGL100701  3 1 BCE: Poetry & Lyrical Essay

“Poetry” (and perhaps any lyrical impulse that drives a writer to the page) is, according to British Romantic poet William Wordsworth, “the spontaneous overflow of powerful feelings.” What, exactly, makes one want to write a poem or essay about him- or herself? What does the writer do with all this feeling, to learn to communicate it, shape it and make it art (as well as something others want to read)? Wordsworth went on to say that poetry (and again, perhaps any creative written expression) “takes its origin from emotion recollected in tranquility.” It is that tranquility, that stillness, that helps the writer shape feeling and thought into something tangible.

In our workshop we will practice both poetry and the lyrical essay, learning how to harness the strong feelings a young writer wants to express, and finding the more tranquil space in which these words can find shape and meaning. We’ll read selections of both kinds of writing, but most of the work will come through the process of making: exercises designed to get at aspects of structure, sound, sense, movement, and design that make the words on the page do something new, something unexpected, and, hopefully, something fun to create.
June 24 - July 31, T TH 1-4p.m. Prof. Susan Roberts

 

Film

FILM 338301 Film Criticism and Theory

In essence, we become film critics when we explore our opinions about a film in light of the plot, characterization, dramatic tension, etc. As an art form, film criticism emerged on a large scale following release of the controver
sial film Birth of a Nation (1915). Today film critiques are found in our daily newspapers and weekly journals. This course will continue the process through the screening and discussion of primarily independent films. Students will read extensive critiques and theory, while developing sharp critical and writing skills.
June 23–July 30, M W, 6:00 - 9:15 p.m. Professor John Michalczyk, Ph.D.

 

History

HIST 103901 The West and the World: 1500-1789

The past five hundred years witnessed the rise to power and prosperity of Western Societies. This course examines the significance of the beginning of global relationships. Includes issues in early modern European history, as well as early exploration, the colonization of America, the African slave trade and the Atlantic economic dependency.
June 24–July 31, T TH, 6:00 - 9:15 p.m. Adjunct Associate Professor Karen Miller, Ph.D.

HIST 242101 American Presidency

This course examines the single most important position of power in our political system, the men who shaped it, and the elections that placed them in that office. Although the course begins with the drafting of the Constitution, the focus is on the twentieth century.
June 24–July 31, T TH, 8:30 - 11:45 a.m. Associate Professor Mark Gelfand, Ph.D.

HIST 283101 Modern America: 1945 to the Present

An investigation of America since World War II. Topics include the Cold War, McCarthyism, Civil Rights, Vietnam, the women's movement, the Reagna years and life in the 1980's, 1990's to the present.
June 23–July 30, M W, 8:30 - 11:45 a.m. Visiting Professor Alex Bloom, Ph.D.

 

Journalism

ADJO 334901 Politics and the Media: Power and Influence

An analysis of mass media’s impact on the workings of the American system. The media’s interaction and influence on political institutions, on the presidential selection process, on national and international events, on office holders,
politicians, heads of state and the treatment of economic upheaval and violence are analyzed. Considers the media’s role in the coverage of war, especially in a terrorist world.
June 23–July 30, M W, 6:00 - 9:15 p.m. Visiting Professor Marie Natoli, Ph.D.

 

Languages and Literature

FRENCH LITERATURE IN ENGLISH

RLRL 116301 Boston’s French Connection (Course closed)

Students will explore the following topics: early French explorers and the Acadian experience, Boston’s Puritans and French Huguenots, the American and French Revolutions, French influences on Boston’s Catholics and Unitarian Transcendentalists, French influences on Boston’s musicians, painters, sculptors, architects politicians and writers, and contributions of the different Francophone peoples in Boston. Students will develop skill in analyzing historical and literary texts and will examine closely passages in Alexis de Tocqueville’s "Democracy in America" and Simone de Beauvoir’s "America Day by Day".
June 24–July 31, T TH, 6:00 - 9:15 p.m. Adjunct Professor James Flagg

FRENCH

FREN 110901 Intermediate French I

The emphasis will be on building upon prior study and developing a practical knowledge of the French language, as spoken by native speakers in contemporary France. Our goal is to help students develop oral and written proficiency in the language. The emphasis is on contemporary French culture and history, vocabulary expansion, accuracy of expression, and interactive language use. Short literary and cultural readings will provide authentic insight. Classroom work will be supplemented with webbased assignments and an online audio program.
June 23–July 10, M T W TH, 6:00 - 9:15 p.m. Lecturer Sarah Bilodeau, Cand. Ph.D.

FREN 111001 Intermediate French II

This course is a continuation of FREN1109 (Intermediate French I) and is also open to students who have placed into this course. Students will continue to expand their vocabulary and develop their fluency, both written and oral. Emphasis is on active student participation and a broadening of historical and cultural knowledge. Francophone culture will be explored through literary excerpts by authors from France, Africa, and the Caribbean. Classroom work will be supplemented with film, webbased assignments and an online audio program.
July 14–July 31, M T W TH, 6:00 - 9:15 p.m. Senior Lecturer Andrea Javel, A.M.

*Intermediate French I & II must be taken together and will be the only classes an individual BCE student will register for.


SPANISH

SPAN 101501 Elementary Spanish I

This beginning course is designed for students with no prior Spanish experience as well as those who have had some high school Spanish and are not sufficiently prepared for intermediate level work. Students with no prior Spanish experience should also sign up for RL 017. Emphasis is on building oral and written communication skills and acquiring a greater awareness of the Hispanic world. Class instruction is supplemented by videos and CDROM and web activities.
June 23–July 10, M T W TH, 6:00 - 9:15 p.m. Gonzalez-Pedemonte

SPAN 101601 Elementary Spanish II

This course is a continuation of SPAN1015. Course goals include readying students for Intermediate Spanish, expanding vocabulary, and building oral proficiency. Students will deepen their understanding of Hispanic culture through short literary and cultural readings, videos, and films. Emphasis is on building oral and written communication skills and on acquiring a greater awareness of the Spanishspeaking world.
July 14–July 31, M T W TH, 6:00 - 9:15 p.m. Gonzalez-Pedemonte

*Elementary Spanish I & II must be taken together and will be the only classes an individual BCE student will register for.

SPAN 111501 Intermediate Spanish I

This course builds on previously acquired language skills and helps prepare students to interact with native speakers of Spanish. Emphasis is on vocabulary expansion, accuracy of expression, and interactive language use. Short literary and cultural readings will provide authentic insight into the Hispanic world. Students will have the opportunity to work with videos, films, the internet, and other multimedia materials.
June 23–July 10, M T W TH, 6:00 - 9:15 p.m. Lecturer Karen Daggett, A.M.

SPAN 111601 Intermediate Spanish II

This course is a continuation of SPAN1115. Students will expand their vocabulary and develop written and oral f luency. Emphasis is on active student participation and broadening historical and cultural knowledge. Short literary and cultural readings will provide authentic insight into the Hispanic world. Students will have the opportunity to work with videos, films, the internet, and other multimedia materials.
July 14–July 31, M T W TH, 6:00 - 9:15 p.m. Sheila McIntosh

*Intermediate Spanish I & II must be taken together and will be the only classes an individual BCE student will register for.


Management

ADBM 1052 Organizational Behavior

As an introduction to the study of human behavior in organizations, this course aims at increasing an awareness and understanding of individual, interpersonal, group, and organizational events, as well as increasing a student's ability to explain and influence such events. The course deals with concepts that are applicable to institutions of any type; a central thrust of these concepts concerns the way institutions can become more adaptive and effective. The course is designed to help the student understand and influence the groups and organizations to which he/she currently belongs and with which he/she will become involved in a later career.
June 24–July 31, T TH, 6:00 - 9:15 p.m. Instructor Robert Anzenberger, Cand. Ph.D.

 

Mathematics

MATH 1004 Finite Probability

Survey of applied finite probability including finite sets and partitions, enumeration, sample spaces, expectation and random variables. Also brief introduction to statistics.
MATH 100401 June 23–July 30, M W, 6:00 - 9:15 p.m. Associate Professor Rennie Mirollo, Ph.D.

Or

MATH 100402 June 24–July 31, T TH, 8:30 - 11:45 a.m. Associate Professor Ned Rosen, Ph.D.

 

Mathematicians in the Making

For information on course selection for this particular concentration, please visit the Mathematicians in the Making page.

 

Philosophy

PHIL 100501 Basic Problems of Philosophy

This course introduces students to the problems and procedures of the Western philosophical tradition. Examines selected works of such key thinkers as Plato, Aristotle, St. Augustine, Descartes, Locke and Rousseau.
June 24-July 31, T TH, 6:00 - 9:15p.m. Professor TBD

PHIL 228501 The American Dream: A Philosophical Investigation

What does it mean to be an American in the 21st century, in the post September 11th climate? How do we structure our society, how do we live together as neighbors, how do we adapt to the new realities? Students will emerge with greater knowledge about and curiosity concerning the social, economic, political, cultural and psychological processes that shape contemporary definitions of the self and identity and that contribute to the formation of behaviors in the 21st century. Through film, literature, and contemporary scholarship, course surveys and engages some key concepts in Americans’ ways of life: their roots, their developments, the tension between them and the impact of a changing world. Course examines terms like freedom and equality, rights and obligations, liberal and conservative, security and fear, individual and community are examined and uses them for assessment and understanding.
June 23–July 30, M W, 6:00 - 9:15 p.m. Visitng Professor Hessam Dehghani, Ph.D.

 

Political Science

POLI 106101 Indroduction to American Politics

An overview of contemporary American government and politics focusing on how the institutions envisioned by the Framers of the Constitution (Congress, the judiciary, the executive) function today. Particular emphasis will be placed on how developments since the 1960s have affected the interaction of national, state, and local governmental actors, political participation, the articulation of interests, and policy formulation and implementation. Topics covered will include the media, public interest and advocacy organizations, campaign technologies and consultants, and public policy research institutes (think tanks). Whenever possible, comparisons between the U.S. and other advanced industrial democracies will be explored.
June 23–July 30, M W, 6:00 - 9:15 p.m. Professor TBD

 

Psychology

PSYC 111101 Introduction to Psychology as a Social Science

This course is one of two introductory courses required for Psychology majors, along with PS1110. This course introduces students to the basic questions, perspectives, and methods that characterize the fields of developmental, social, cultural, personality, and clinical psychology.
June 23–July 30, M W, 8:15 - 11:30 a.m. Lecturer Janice D’Avignon, Ph.D.

PSYC 224201 Personality Theories

This course introduces students to a variety of theoretical approaches to the understanding of character and personality.
June 24–July 31, T TH, 8:15 - 11:30 a.m. Associate Professor Donnah Canavan, Ph.D.

PSYC 226801 Psychological Development Through the Life Span

Introduces the issues underlying the developmental process: infant knowledge, the nature of human attachment, separation, male and female differences, the meaning of adulthood, the interaction of physiological and psychological processes and the predictability of human development.
June 24–July 31, T TH, 6:00 - 9:15 p.m. Associate Professor Michael Moore, Ph.D.

 

Sociology

SOCY 104901 Social Problems

This course is an exploration of different sociological approaches to the study of social problems and social trends in contemporary society. It examines the linkages between social structures/institutions, culture and human experience. The course emphasizes theoretical research issues, especially how, and to what degree, the understanding of social problems are a direct result of the processes used to define social problems as well as the research methods and procedures used to investigate them. Students will learn to critique popular discourses from a critical sociological perspective and will be encouraged to form their own opinions and critiques.
June 24–July 31, T TH, 6:00 - 9:15 p.m. Professor TBD

 

Theology

THEO 100201 Biblical Heritage II

The Bible has been an influential and often fundamental source for many modern, Western views of God, nature, human beings, a just society, and the origin and destiny of humanity and the world. An intelligent, serious reading of the Bible raises most of the perennial questions that have traditionally stood at the center of philosophical and theological debate. Thus, a thorough analysis of Biblical texts in terms of the central concerns of the Core curriculum will be the primary goal of the Biblical Heritage course.
June 24–July 31, T TH, 6:00 - 9:15 p.m. Associate Professor John Darr, Ph.D.

THEO 102401 Exploring Catholicism: Tradition and Transformation II

A two semester exploration of the vision, beliefs, practices, and challenge of Catholicism. The first semester explores human existence lived in the light of the Mystery of God and the gift of Jesus Christ. The second semester considers the Church as the people of God, gathered and sent forth in the Spirit, the sacraments as catalysts of ongoing transformation in Christ, and the challenge of the spiritual life today. Close analysis of passages from the Bible will be supplemented by readings from contemporary theologians, literary figures, and social commentators.
June 23–July 30, M W, 6:00 - 9:15 p.m. Associate Professor Boyd Coolman

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