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William F. Connell School of Nursing

Hutchinson receives grant funding

connell school news

Associate Dean Kathy Hutchinson

Associate Dean Kathy Hutchinson will be the co- principal investigator on a study entitled “Maternal Influences of Substance Use Among Urban Black Male Adolescents”

According to the overview provided by Hutchinson, “The study examines the influence of urban African American mothers on their sons’ tobacco, alcohol and other substance (TAOS) use. The purposes are to: a) test the effectiveness of a theory driven, culture-specific,  health promotion/risk reduction intervention with urban black mothers on their use and their adolescent sons’ use of TAOS and b) evaluate which maternal outcome behaviors mediate intervention effects for sons. We propose to undertake a secondary analysis of data from a RCT intervention study in which a mother-son HIV sexual risk reduction intervention was implemented and evaluated (R01MH55742; Jemmott, P.I.) with 575 dyads of inner-city black mothers and their sons, ages 11-15, from 42 public housing communities in Philadelphia, PA. Mother-son dyads were randomized to receive either: a) an HIV sexual risk-reduction intervention or b) a health promotion intervention focusing on diet, exercise, TAOS use and cancer prevention.  In the original study, the HIV sexual risk-reduction intervention was the experimental condition, while the health promotion intervention served as the control condition. Data related to TAOS use and the effectiveness of the health promotion intervention on TAOS use were not germane to the original study aims and were not analyzed. The study findings will be used to estimate effect sizes, guide further development of family-based TAOS prevention interventions for urban black male adolescents and serve as preliminary data for a RCT study to evaluate the interventions.  The specific aims and hypotheses for the proposed study are to:

Specific Aim 1:  Test whether mothers in the health promotion intervention condition show greater increases in intentions to influence their sons’ TAOS use, and in actual influencing behaviors (monitoring, TAOS communication) at 3, 6 and 12 months, compared to mothers in the control condition.

Specific Aim 2: Test  whether mothers in the health promotion intervention condition show a greater decrease in their own TAOS use at 3, 6, and 12 months, compared with mothers in the control condition.

Specific Aim 3:  Test  whether sons of the mothers in the health promotion intervention condition show a greater decrease in TAOS use at 3, 6 and 12 months, compared with sons in the control condition.

Specific Aim 4:  Test which maternal outcome variables in the model (e.g., maternal monitoring, mother-son TAOS communication, maternal modeling of TAOS use) mediate intervention effects on sons’ TAOS use.”