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Resources

Resources

We at ISPRC are committed to distributing resources that promote the study of race and culture across the world and promote social justice in research and practice at home and abroad. The following only scratch the surface of such resources and provides information about resources received by ISPRC to future a social justice mission. It is hoped though, that the information therein instigates and supports actions that are socially just.

 

A Race Is a Nice Thing to Have

Dr. Janet E. Helms' book has become a must for all of us. Insightful, powerful, and to the point. The book is enriched with many practical exercises leading to insight and meaningful class discussions.  Purchase Dr. Helms' bookA Race in a Nice Thing to Have: A Guide to Being a White Person or Understanding the White Persons in Your Life

 
Report on Grants Received by ISPRC
  1. Grant Number:  1R13MH078714-01A1
    ICD:  National Institute of Mental Health

    Project Title:  Addressing Cultural Factors and Mental Health Disparities in Research and Practice

    Primary Investigators:  Janet E. Helms, Ph.D., Guerda Nicolas, Ph.D., Boston College Department of Counseling, Developmental and Educational Psychology

    Funding Amount:  $370,724

    Project Duration:  June 5, 2007 - May 31, 2010

    Project Abstract:  This Conference Grant will support three annual conferences aimed at sharing state of the art scientific research and best professional practices to address mental health disparities of racial/ethnic minorities and immigrants. The successive themes for the three years are (a) addressing the intersections between race and culture in scientific research and mental health service delivery for children, adolescents, and families; and (b) examination of the intersection of culture, race, trauma and mental health across the life span; and (c) racial identity and cultural factors in treatment and service delivery. The primary common goals and objectives of each of the conferences are to: (1) Share state of the art mental health theory, research, and practice with respect to the roles of race and culture in the etiology, maintenance, and remediation of mental health disparities; (2) Use strategies to engage scientist-practitioners and mental health service providers in interdisciplinary communication and collaboration to address the role of culture and race in their research, practice, and service delivery; (3) Develop and disseminate information regarding race and culture and mental health disparities. Speakers for the conference will be nationally and internationally acknowledged researchers and clinicians presenting in the areas of expertise via interactive formats.