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eColloquia Newsletter


Interim Dean Maureen Kenny

Message from Interim Dean Maureen Kenny

Dear Alumni and Friends,

Greetings from Campion Hall!

As we enter the height of our spring semester, I note how fortunate we are to have strong, accessible educational resources at Boston College. While we at the Lynch School are grateful for these blessings, our students, faculty, and staff remain mindful that there are many communities at home and abroad for which quality education and psychological services are out of reach.

Earlier this semester, I was struck by a New York Times story about thousands of South African students, some accompanied by their anxious parents, who gathered outside of the University of Johannesburg, eager for a chance to apply for one of 800 coveted seats at one of South Africa’s public universities. The line was more than a mile long when the university gates opened, and the massive crowd began to run, shoving and screaming, turning into a human stampede that killed one mother and injured dozens of prospective students. The horrific episode at the university’s gates draws attention to the value attached to higher education as a vehicle for social and economic advancement throughout the world. And it casts the lethargic pace of progress toward achieving equal access to education in stark relief.

With that in mind, I particularly value the efforts of the scores of Lynch School students, faculty, and alumni who collaborate with communities, schools, and families to break down barriers to education—and who rebuild just systems that offer a better future for children, adolescents, and families across the globe.

In this issue of eColloquia, you will read about ways in which the Lynch School is enhancing educational opportunities for Boston public school students eager to attend college; among students and teachers using technology in the Newton schools; and through international education research aimed at improving higher education policies and practice. We are at the forefront of many efforts to improve the educational chances of people around the world.

In our globally interconnected era, I applaud our community of students, alumni, faculty, and staff who work to meet the needs of the world around us. And I wish you a happy spring.

Warm regards,

Maureen Kenny