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Hannah England ’10

Graduate of princeton university. marathon runner and triathlete; competed in the ironman  hawaii world championships in 2007. hopes to practice corporate law in the life sciences and health care practice areas.

WHAT GOT YOU STARTED IN THE ENDURANCE SPORT OF TRIATHLON?

I was a two-time All-American rower at Princeton. After that, I ran a handful of marathons, and then tried triathlon on a whim. In my first race, I had to ask my coach what to wear because I was so new to this. But I placed third in my age group, really liked it, and soon was hooked.

HOW DO YOU BALANCE TRAINING FOR AN IRONMAN WITH TRAINING TO BECOME AN ATTORNEY?

So far, I’ve been able to maintain a balance. On a typical weekday, I run, swim, or bike for one to two hours. On the longest weekends, I practice ten hours. [Ironman competitors swim 2.4 miles, bike 112 miles, and then run a 26.2-mile marathon, all in the course of a few hours.]

WHERE DO YOU TRAVEL FOR COMPETITIONS?

To qualify for the World Championships in Hawaii, I won my age group in Ironman France and in St. Croix. This year we also went to Monaco. But there are a lot of great local races, too.

THAT MUST COME WITH A FINANCIAL COST.

I’m still getting sponsorships. Powerbar is one of my main sponsors and they have been great.

HOW DOES BC LAW SHOW ITS SUPPORT OF YOUR TALENT AND DEDICATION OUTSIDE OF SCHOOL?

Succeeding academically has always been a priority for me. But I had to miss a week of class in my first year and my professors were very supportive, as many of them are athletes themselves. I actually swim with one of my professors, Sharon Beckman. I didn’t even know she was a professor until I walked into her class for the first time.

CAN YOU DRAW ANY PARALLELS BETWEEN LAW SCHOOL AND TRIATHLON?

They both require a lot of focus and discipline. It’s also important to stay on top of things. In law school, we don’t get tested until the end of the semester. Similarly, in triathlon, you train for a very long time for just one race. I try to break it down and think about it in small pieces. I just stay focused on passing one person in front of me.

—Tiffany Wilding-White