Skip to main content

Secondary navigation:

Carroll School of Management Graduate Programs

Carroll School’s Dean Andy Boynton Inspires Entrepreneurs In His New Book: "The Idea Hunter"

“Often, great ideas come from simply improvising upon something already created,” writes Andy Boynton.

Andy Boynton
Andy Boynton: Boston College Carroll School of Management Dean

The Idea Hunter: How to Find the Best Ideas and Make them Happen a book co-authored by Boston College Carroll School of Management Dean, Andy Boynton and Professor Bill Fischer, is gaining excellent media coverage. Fortune Magazine, Inc. Magazine, CNBC, Investors.com, Business Spot.com and BNet have favorably reviewed the book. Forbes.com even asked Boynton to be a blog contributor.

Boynton says The Idea Hunter shows ideas are everywhere and managers can discover ideas in other ways than just surrounding themselves with creative types. "Our book blows away the myth that the only great ideas are original ones. Often, great ideas are simply improvising upon something that is already created," he says.

To illustrate their point, the authors cite dozens of run of the mill ideas that helped found iconic American companies such as Wal-Mart, The Walt Disney Company and Ford. Reviewers have said the book encourages those people who do not feel that they are a genius, that they are worthy of discovering great things. Often the smartest people in an organization stick to their success formula and therefore, do not hunt for better ideas. The less clever people are those who seek new ideas.

For this writer, The Idea Hunter was a real game changer. Because of The Idea Hunter I now reserve for myself the best hour of each day to learn something new, either through reading or by chatting with people whom I might not normally encounter.

The Idea Hunter also inspired me to buy a gorgeous, quilted box in which to put clippings, handwritten notes and brochures — anything that might generate a news article, blog or children's storybook idea. I will review the box frequently, culling anything useless and acting upon the ideas I still like. Meanwhile, I am joining new social groups. If The Idea Hunter is accurate, all of this will help fuel and cultivate my constant ideas. As Boynton writes; "Ideas don't come to people like a bolt out of the blue. Ideas are all around us, just waiting to be discovered and noticed."