Skip to main content

Secondary navigation:

COLLEGE OF ARTS AND SCIENCES

Research

spectroscopy group

file

The main theme of our research is the luminescence spectroscopy of laser solids.

Luminescence spectroscopy is an active field of research that has implications ranging from phosphor technology to lasers. The purpose of our research is to conduct experimental and theoretical work on solids that have the potential to be used as laser materials. We are also in tune with the advances and promises of new themes that have recently emerged, such as quantum confinement effects and the related optical properties of low dimensional systems.

In addition to pursuing purely scientific goals, we aim to design initiatives which foster a closer collaboration between industrial and academic researchers. We also strive to create a greater awareness on the part of faculty advisors of the great potential of luminescence spectroscopy as a theme for scientific education of graduate and undergraduate students.

Current Research

Presently we are investigating the effects of confinement on the spectral parameters of rare earth and transition metal ions embedded in oxide nano-particles.

A primary focus of our research is to conduct experimental and theoretical work on solids that have the potential to be used as laser materials. This work has been supported by NASA. The purpose of our studies is to enhance the output of such systems and to bring it to the desired spectroscopic region.

Another study of interest is in the energy level diagram of the trivalent rare earth ions situated in solids. Our program sets to map out the ultraviolet and vacuum ultraviolet energy levels of a number of these ions in solids and to refine theoretical models of these systems.

We are also studying some of the rare-earth ions in glasses and ceramics. These types of materials (Tm-doped glasses in particular) are used in fiber optic lasers. By studying how the optical properties of the rare earth ions in glasses vary with glass compositions, we can optimize the performance of these materials in regards to laser efficiency and bandwidth.

Rare-earth-doped glasses are also being examined to reveal the nature of the vibrational modes of disordered systems. The local structure at each rare-earth ion determines in part the optical behavior of these ions. Fluorescence line-narrowing studies allow us to select subsets of ions having different local environments, and to look at the fluorescence properties individually. We study how the vibronic structure of the emission spectrum varies with the local structure.

Recently, we have been also investigating non-linear processes. The response of these systems vary in a non-linear manner with the impulse. Using a pulsed laser to provide the impulse, we study processes such as energy transfer and excited state absorption that vary as the square or cube of the input energy. These processes are important for laser applications.

We are also in tune with the advances and promises of new themes that have recently emerged, such as quantum confinement effects and the related optical properties of low dimensional systems.

In the past, we have conducted research in flash photolysis and molecular spectroscopy, photo-acoustics and femtospectroscopy, and we maintain a continued interest in these fields.

All our research is done in our laboratory.