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2003 Bachelors Theses

computer science

Author: Michael Elliot
 
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Title: An Attempt at 4-Legged Robocup
Advisor: Robert Signorile
An attempt to design and implement an entire AIBO to be Robocup ready proved a challenging, and rewarding experience. Due to the large scale time requirements and time consuming technical issues that had to be dealt with, my experimentation was cut short. Successes, however, include the creation of a vision system and of an omni-directional walking system that could be used to achieve the ultimate goal of playing soccer. These systems are in many ways a final product in themselves - typically teams are separated into groups which complete each sub-model in the dog, giving them freedom to explore many options. In addition, I had no starting point and had to learn the OPEN-R programming environment on my own, and thus, development required a significantly greater amount of time as compared to a situation where there was already a working system with knowledgeable people there to oversee.
 
Author: Hiroyuki Hayano
 
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Title: Distributed Data Storage: Archiving Over Networks
Advisor: Elizabeth Borowsky
Technology today allows for hard drives that are tens of gigabytes in capacity, and the Distributed Data Storage (DDS) system is an attempt at making a good use of a small, unused portions of such drives in networked computers. The client of the the DDS service can split a substantially large file into small packages and back them up in remote computers. The system can be used for digital archiving of massive data, and this paper serves as a cornerstone for a suggested model of such application.
 
Author: Frank Mazzacano
 
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Title: A Reliable Multicast Protocol for a Distributed System
Advisor: Robert Signorile
Since the advent of Internet gaming users have been mostly concerned with a quick connection that will allow them to receive and send game state information. However, users also demand that the information they exchange is done so in a reliable way, to maintain fairness between all clients. This ended up making developers weigh pros and cons in picking the packet transportation protocol. They settled on a unicast protocol, which is more reliable, but not as quick as possible. I have chosen to use the less utilized protocol of multicast to send and receive information between clients in a distributed gaming system.
 
Author: Evan McCarthy
 
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Title: A Three Dimensional Environment Suitable for Distribution over a Multicast Network
Advisor: Robert Signorile
The development of three-dimensional environments (3DEs) revolutionized the computer graphics industry, in particular the gaming industry, by bringing computer graphics one step closer to replicating reality. This application is a 3DE that replicates Ignacio Hall and serves as the backdrop for a distributed system in which users compete against each other for resources and objectives. The 3DE must resemble the model and interact with the users in a realistic way.
 
Author: Jonathan Pearlin
 
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Title: A Distributed Mutual Exclusion Algorithm Using Multicast Communication
Advisor: Robert Signorile
The presented algorithm in this paper uses a combination of various mutual exclusion techniques in conjunction with synchronization techniques and multicast communication. The goal is to provide an efficient, low traffic algorithm that provides mutual exclusion to a distributed system with shared resources. Previous work in the field suggests that optimization in distributed mutual exclusion algorithms is related to the number of messages required to achieve the mutual exclusion of shared resources. The proposed algorithm promises to achieve this in a constant number of required messages, which is the result of the use of multicast communication. The developed algorithm was applied to a distributed system with three-dimensional graphics in order to display its functionality and practically in the world of distributed systems.
 
Author: Sharif Tai
 
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Title: Bringing together EagleEyes users: Creating TCP Peer-to-Peer programs for two person interaction over the internet
Advisor: James Gips
The EagleEyes system allows non-ambulatory, non-verbal people to use a computer, often for the first time. The EagleEyes connect system now allows them to move from simply interacting with the computer to have the ability to connect with another user anywhere in the world. They can then communicate or play games with another EagleEyes user, allowing them to explore a previously closed avenue.
 
 
Author: Timothy Wake
 
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Title: RNA Secondary Structure Prediction Using Applications of the Partition Function
Advisor: Peter Clote
A dynamic programming algorithm is presented for calculating the partition function and the pairwise base-pairing probabilities over all secondary structures for a given RNA nucleotide sequence, and the calculation of the pairwise base-pairing probabilities; the algorithm is an application of the approach used by McCaskill to accomplish this for nested secondary structures to the class of structures inclusive of pseudo-knots, using a technique due to Eddy et. al.
 
 
Author: Trisha Yaw
 
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Title: Fault-Tolerance of E-Commerce Transaction Protocols
Advisor: Elizabeth Borowsky
E-commerce began in the early 1990s, as the internet grew. One of the primary business forces driving the growth of the internet was the potential for on- line shopping. To enable both the trust of users of business transactions as well as to guard against on- line scams, Visa and MasterCard teamed up to develop a secure method of transfer. Secure Electronic Transmission (SET) was created to allow safe credit card transactions over the internet. As the late 1990s grew into the dot-com boom, different protocols were developed for varying purposes. Digicash created Ecash, in the expectation that users would want an anonymous means for purchasing products, and Paypal came into existence to enable regular people a means of purchasing items from each other.