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Junior Scholars Research Grants

Center for Christian-Jewish Learning

The Center for Christian-Jewish Learning Junior Scholars Research Grants support Boston College junior scholars (defined as undergraduate and graduate students) pursuing research that is of value to the field of Christian-Jewish relations. Recipients must engage in scholarship under the guidance of a faculty member.

Grants may support recipients' production of articles, book sections or chapters, conference presentations, digital materials, translations, or other scholarly resources.

Research grants are one-time awards of $1,000. Up to five research grants are awarded each academic year and each summer.

Please click here for application details and instructions.

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Rosemary Chandler, a junior from the College of A&S and a recipient of a Junior Scholars Research Grant, presented her research on the portrayal of Judaism and the Old Testament in Christian artwork dating from the Middle Ages through the Renaissance as part of the BC Talks scholarship forum.

2013 Summer Winners

Peter Cajka, Boston College Ph.D. History Student
Cajka wrote a research paper focused on the role Christian-Jewish relations played in the post-World War II reconstruction of conscience. His research explains "why the idea of conscience as a dignified force that obeyed external legal codes lost out to an interpretation of the conscience in the late 1960s as an internal guide individuals followed only after prolonged discernment." His research shows that Christian and Jewish thinkers of the time were "recasting religion and morality in America."
Paper available here.

2012 Summer Winners

James Daryn Henry, Boston College Ph.D. Theology Student
Henry developed a publishable article and public presentation based on a constructive development from the Christian perspective of the theology of Israel, particularly through engagement with the work of the contemporary theologian Robert Jenson. He states, "The fundamental problem with which this study wrestles is: how can the Christian Community, and the intellectual reflection on its life--theology--understand itself in relation to the continuing Jewish Community in a way that both promotes 'mutually enriching relationships' in their self-understanding together as People of God, and that remains faithful to the distinctiveness of each confession?"
Article available here.

Cristina Richie, Boston College Th.M. Student and entering Ph.D. Theology Student
Richie created resources for classroom or church lessons on Jewish-Christian bioethics that can be adopted and adapted for colleges and high schools, churches, and adult educational opportunities--including religion, bioethics, ethics, and health courses. She explains, "Recent Jewish-Christian ecumenical endeavors of collaboration have by and large sought to establish theologically consonant ground in order to facilitate peaceful dialogue and a fruitful alliance. In inter-religious dialogue, bioethics has been in the background as national and international political policies and reconciliation from the atrocities of World War II take the foreground."
Resources: Abortion. Assisted Reproductive Technologies. Contraception. Documents. Ethical Theory. Eugenics. Euthanasia. Organ Donation. Theology.

2011-2012 Academic Year Winners

Susan Legere, Ph.D. (2012, Boston College, Sociology)
Legere presented her dissertation Narratives of Injustice: Measuring the Impact of Witness Testimony in the Classroom at "The Future of Holocaust Testimonies," an international conference and workshop in Akko, Israel. Her research generates "much-needed empirical data on survivor testimony and its ability to shape attitudes, broaden world view, and possibly influence behavior."

Matthew Mohorovich, Boston College Philosophy Ph.D. Student
Mohorovich traveled to Sarajevo and interviewed members of the Jewish community who were present during the siege of Sarajevo in the 1990s and played an active role in relief efforts. He explains that when we look at Bosnia's history, "we do not see the sort of history we might expect--one marked and stained by clashes, but instead see one that has been characterized by centuries of inter-religious solidarity, perseverance, and openness to 'the other'--the stranger,' 'the foreigner.'"

Iulia Padeanu, Boston College Senior
Padeanu traveled to Romania to interview and record the testimonies of Romanians, both Jewish and Christians, of their experience in the Holocaust. She explains, "Much of the history written during the Communist era ignored the anti-Semitic policies of WWII," and so the "importance of living memory cannot be overestimated. Soon, students of history will not be able to get the opportunity to speak to those that were alive during WWII." She presented her research on the Romanian Holocaust at the BC Talks lecture series.
Article available here.

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Susan Legere, Ph.D., ninth from the left in the photograph above, presented her dissertation research at "The Future of Holocaust Testimonies" conference in Akko, Israel.

2011 SUMMER WINNERS

Steven Candido, Boston College Senior
Candido traveled to Berlin to conduct research for his history thesis "Youth is Not an Excuse: A Study of Young German Resisters in Nazi Germany." His thesis focuses on the non-Jewish youth resisters during the Holocaust. He explains, "It is a vastly understudied field that deserves more research and recognition, especially in the quest for improving Jewish-Christian relations."
Abstract. Thesis Cover Page. Final Thesis.

Rosemary Chandler, Boston College Junior
Chandler will develop a publishable article "The Downfall of Synagoga: A Study of the Dynamic Allegory in Italian Renaissance Art." She will combine her interests in European artwork and Jewish studies to research a "lesser studied subject of Italian Renaissance art: Judaism and the 'Jewish' Old Testament, and what depictions of this subject matter reveal about Christian attitudes towards Judaism and the position of Jews in Italian society."

Caitlyn Duehren, Boston College M.T.S. Student
Duehren developed an article that addresses a gap in feminist Jewish-Christian theology. Her research focuses on the place of women in Second Temple Period Judaism, recovering movements or tendencies within Judaism that were "liberative in nature, upon which Jesus, the Jew, likely drew." Duehren explains that exploring this is "an attempt to move beyond the dualistic Jesus verses Judaism, which is denigrating to both Judaism and Jesus." She states, "I hope to bring together Christian and Jewish feminist theology and eradicate the inauthentic proclivity towards anti-Judaism often found in Christian feminism."
Article available here.

Nicholas Wagner, Boston College M.T.S. Student
Wagner developed a historical and literary analysis of Pauline texts as well as other relevant primary sources. His article aims at "exploring both Paul's Hellenism and how, if at all, it influenced anti-Judaism for early Christ-believers." He intends his research "to provide a fuller understanding of the historical realities facing Jews and Christ-believers in the first century" as well as "aid contemporary scholarship in demystifying Paul's anti-Jewishness."
Article available here.

2010-2011 ACADEMIC YEAR WINNERS

Matthew Kruger, Boston College Theology Ph.D. Student
Kruger developed an article, "Fear, Love, and the Law: The Spiritual Nature of Judaism and Christianity in Aquinas and Bonaventure." Kruger hopes to address the dearth of research on the subject, stating "Filling in this void is essential to filling out the picture of the medieval Christian perspective towards the Jewish religion."
Article available here.

Jeffrey C. Witt, Boston College Philosophy Ph.D. Candidate
Witt designed a detailed course syllabus on "Jewish and Christian Medieval Approaches to Philosophy of Religion." He explains, "There are few resources for how to approach medieval Jewish-Christian relations and intellectual debates from the perspective of a mainstream philosophy course... I hope to provide other philosophers with an example of how they might incorporate both Christian and Jewish sources in their courses in a more extensive way."
Syllabus available here.