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Gozik Settling Into Job of Directing International Programs

09/20/12
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Nick Gozik joined Boston College this summer as director of the Office of International Programs and the McGillycuddy-Logue Center. (Photo by Lee Pellegrini)

By Sean Smith | Chronicle Editor

Published: Sept. 20, 2012

With a solid background in both the administrative and academic aspects of international education, Nick Gozik is pleased to be in his first academic year as director of Office of International Programs and the McGillycuddy-Logue Center for Undergraduate Global Studies.

Gozik formally began his duties in July, after having served as assistant director of the Global Education Office for Undergraduates at Duke University for almost four years. He succeeded Bernd Widdig, who had directed the office since 2007.

“I am very happy to be at Boston College, and in the Office of International Programs,” said Gozik, who was born in Australia. “The International Programs staff is extremely professional and experienced, and is one of the best I’ve seen. Thanks to the efforts of Bernd Widdig and others, BC is at a perfect point to make the transition to a new level of international education, and I hope to do everything I can to make this possible.”

With some 1,200 students going abroad each year, and approximately 150 students from other countries coming to campus, said Gozik, the University’s commitment to international education as an institutional priority — as expressed in its Strategic Plan — is clear.

“Moreover, Boston College’s emphasis on reflection, in keeping with its Jesuit tradition, is very well-suited to international education. Students should not view a study-abroad experience as an end in and of itself, but as an opening to consider what direction the next phase of their lives might take.”

Gozik worked as assistant director of international education at the University of Richmond, and as a consultant for the Social Science Research Council. He also has served as a research assistant and later visiting professor at New York University, where he earned his master’s and doctoral degrees. He has spent time in some 30 countries, and his experiences include teaching in Korea, studying in Brazil and conducting research in the French Caribbean.

“Immersing yourself in another language, another culture, is one of the best things you can do for yourself,” he said. “Your assumptions are challenged, and you are open to so many new and different perspectives. You don’t realize how small the world really is until you start to travel.”

Among his research activities, Gozik has explored the internationalization of higher education — receiving funding from the US Department of Education — and his current work explores how students make decisions on studying abroad.

Gozik sees several areas of focus for international education at BC: increasing opportunities in “less traditional locations,” such as China, India and Brazil; working with the Jesuit community to take advantage of its global network of contacts; fostering more experiential learning and internships abroad; and engaging those groups, such as AHANA students or undergraduates studying math and science, who “tend to be under-represented in international education.”

Overall, Gozik said, the office and the McGillycuddy-Logue Center will continue efforts to increase their visibility in the University community. “We want to reach out to others on and off campus, so that faculty and students have voices in what we do.”