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lynch school of education

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Lynch School of Education

The Lynch School offers undergraduate and graduate programs in education and applied psychology and human development.

The mission of the Lynch School of Education is to improve the human condition through education. It pursues this goal through excellence and ethics in teaching, research, and service. It prepares undergraduate and graduate students to serve diverse populations in a variety of professional roles as teachers, administrators, human service providers, psychologists, and researchers.

Through research, the Lynch School seeks to advance knowledge in its respective fields, inform policy, and improve practice. Teachers, scholars, and learners at Lynch engage in collaborative school and community improvement efforts locally, nationally, and internationally. What unites the diverse work conducted within the Lynch School of Education is the underlying aspiration to enhance the human condition, to expand the human imagination, and to make the world more just.

The Lynch School is named in honor of Carolyn A. and Peter S. Lynch. Carolyn Lynch is a fervent supporter of education, as is her husband, Peter Lynch, a Boston College graduate and one of the country's best-known financial investors.

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Undergraduate Programs

Undergraduate students in the Lynch School may choose to major in Elementary Education, Secondary Education or Applied Psychology and Human Development. All students entering Lynch School undergraduate programs follow a program of study in selected majors and complete Core requirements and electives needed to fulfill degree requirements.

Elementary Education majors must also complete a second major either in a content area in the College of Arts and Sciences or in one of several interdisciplinary majors. Interdisciplinary majors include Applied Psychology and Human Development, American Heritages, General Science, Mathematics and Computer Science, and Perspectives on Spanish America.

Secondary Education majors must also major in a state-approved licensure area. These areas include Biology, Chemistry, Geology or Earth Sciences, Physics, English, History, Mathematics, Latin Studies, and Classical Humanities.

All education majors complete three pre-practicum experiences (1 day/week for 10 weeks) and one full practicum experience (5 days/week for 14 weeks) in a variety of classrooms where they mediate theory and practice to develop and provide instruction that enhances the life chances of all children. All Elementary and Secondary Education programs lead to endorsement for Initial Licensure in the state of Massachusetts. These programs may change in response to state licensure regulations. All students seeking licensure in Massachusetts must pass all the appropriate Massachusetts Tests for Educator Licensure (MTEL), regardless of in which state students wish to teach.

Graduates from Elementary and Secondary Education programs attain positions in public, private, parochial, and charter schools and other education-related fields and areas that require strong liberal arts, subject matter, and pedagogical preparation and the ability to collaborate with others.

The major in Applied Psychology and Human Development prepares students for work in human, social, and community services and/or for graduate study in counseling, human development, educational psychology, organizational studies, higher education, and related fields. Coursework in this major curriculum offers a theoretical base in developmental and counseling psychology with a focus on understanding psychological processes in a variety of contexts.

Students in Applied Psychology and Human Development obtain employment in educational, human service, and business settings. A practicum experience is strongly recommended and provides students with an opportunity to develop important professional skills and explore career opportunities. The 10-course major provides a strong background in the area of developmental psychology and an introduction to the field of counseling. Students choose to concentrate their upper level courses in one of three focus areas: human services, organizational studies, or community advocacy and social policy. The major is specifically designed for students who wish to work in a range of human service and community settings.

Students in the Applied Psychology and Human Development program are required to complete a minor of six courses in one discipline outside of the Lynch School, an interdisciplinary minor or major in the College of Arts and Sciences or the Carroll School of Management, or a second major or interdisciplinary major in the Lynch School. Graduates receive a Bachelor of Arts or a Bachelor of Science depending on the degree requirements of the second major.

In addition, there is a number of Fifth Year Programs available for academically superior students through which the bachelor's and the master's degrees can be earned in five years. Please refer to the section following the descriptions of majors in the Lynch School of Education for more information about these programs.

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Satisfactory Academic Progress

Beginning with the class of 2014 and beyond, Boston College has restated its degree requirements in terms of credits rather than courses. Lynch School of Education students who are Elementary or Secondary Education majors must successfully complete 120 credits which must include the Core curriculum, the education major, and an appropriate second major. Students who are majoring in Applied Psychology and Human Development must also successfully complete 120 credits, which must include the Core curriculum, the Applied Psychology and Human Development major, and at least one minor in an Arts and Sciences discipline or an Interdisciplinary Minor in the Lynch School or the Carroll School of Management.
 
To continue enrollment in a full-time program of study, a student must maintain a cumulative grade point average of at least 1.667 as the minimum standard of scholarship and must not fall more than six credits behind the total number of credits a student of their status is expected to have completed (Elementary and Secondary Education majors usually carry 15-17 credits each semester during the first three years and 30 credits during the senior year). For example, a first semester sophomore student must have completed at least 30-32 credits during the freshman year. Any student who is permitted by the Dean to continue enrollment in a full-time undergraduate program is considered to be in good standing.
 
Failure to maintain good standing either through a low cumulative grade point average or by incurring excessive deficiencies including failures, withdrawals, or unapproved underloads will result in placement on academic probation, possible withdrawal or dismissal, as determined by the Academic Standards Committee or the Dean.
 
A student on probation may return to good standing by approved methods, e.g., make-up of credits via approved summer school work, raising GPA to acceptable standards, etc. (Students may make up no more than nine credits in summer study.) A student who incurs additional failures or withdrawals, or carries an unapproved underload while on probation, may be required to withdraw from the institution at the time of the next review.

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Information for First Year Students

Although students may satisfy Core requirements (42 credits) during any of their four undergraduate years, they are advised to complete most or, if possible, all Core requirements within the first two years. The remaining 78 credits (minimum) are to be fulfilled by courses required in the major(s), minor(s), and elective choices.

All first semester, first year students should select ENGL1010 First Year Writing Seminar or a Core Literature course, APSY1030, First Year ERA, and the course(s) designated by your major department. (Students who advance place out of Core courses will take different courses selected in collaboration with an advisor.) Major requirements are listed in the sections that follow. If you have not declared a major and are listed as undeclared, follow the course requirements for the Applied Psychology and Human Development major.

The First Year Experience, Reflection, and Action Seminar (First Year ERA), a three-credit course, is also a requirement for all Lynch School students and is taken as a sixth course during first and second semesters, freshman year.

For students in the Class of 2014 and beyond, the Bachelor of Arts in Applied Psychology and Human Development degree requires the completion of at least 120 credits, which includes the University Core. Students must achieve at least a cumulative grade point average of 1.667. Furthermore, students majoring in Applied Psychology and Human Development must also complete an approved minor (18 credits).

Students in the Class of 2014 and beyond majoring in Elementary Education or Secondary Education must also complete 120 credits, which includes the University Core and which are normally distributed over eight semesters of four academic years. Both Elementary and Secondary Education students must also fulfill a second major. Elementary Education majors may fulfill the second major in either a subject in Arts and Sciences or one of the five Lynch School interdisciplinary majors. Secondary Education majors can only fulfill a second major in specific content areas in Arts and Sciences. All Teacher Education majors must complete three pre-practica, a full practicum, and an inquiry seminar. Students pursuing teacher licensure programs, however, must maintain a cumulative grade point average of at least 2.5 in order to be eligible to participate in the full practicum (full-time student teaching). Any student who enrolls in a pre-practicum must obtain a Massachusetts Education Personnel Identification (MEPID). Please consult the Office of Practicum Experiences and Teacher Induction for more information.

The Assistant Dean or the Associate Director of Undergraduate Student Services must approve a program of study in the declared major in the Lynch School before the end of sophomore year. Students majoring in Applied Psychology and Human Development or a teacher licensure program must be accepted officially into the major by the Lynch School.

Students seeking a major leading to teacher licensure must complete and submit a Declaration of Major form and an application for Admission to a Teacher Education Program to the Associate Director (Campion 104). This office reviews applications and accepts qualified applicants prior the end of the sophomore year. Early application to the program is encouraged. Applied Psychology and Human Development majors need to complete a Declaration of Major form.  

The remaining courses required for graduation include additional major courses, minor courses, and electives.

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Practicum Experiences Leading to Teacher Licensure

Endorsement for license is a collaborative effort between the Lynch School Director of Practicum Experiences, the student teacher supervisor, and the cooperating teacher. The Office of Practicum Experiences and Teacher Induction, Campion 103, approves and arranges placements for pre-practica and full-practica leading to licensure only for eligible students enrolled in programs in the Lynch School. Placement also requires prospective teacher candidates to complete a successful interview with the Principal/Headmaster and/or potential cooperating teacher from the school in which they plan to fulfill this requirement. The Director of Practicum Experiences and Teacher Induction, for appropriate reasons, may choose not to approve a student for the practicum. All students seeking licensure in Massachusetts must pass the appropriate Massachusetts Tests for Educator Licensure (MTEL) regardless of in which states students wish to teach upon graduation.

Pre-practica and full practica are essential components and experiences of the teacher preparation curriculum in the Lynch School.Students must complete three semesters of pre-practicum placements (1 day/week/10 days) before they enter a full time student teaching placement in Elementary and Secondary Education classrooms. A full description of student teaching policies may be found at: www.bc.edu/content/bc/schools/lsoe/academics/practicum/policies.html.

A full practicum (student teaching) is a full-time, five-days, per week experience that occurs for a minimum of 14 weeks during the senior year. In the Lynch School, a full practicum must meet the teaching standards required by the Massachusetts Department of Education. Student teachers must demonstrate competence in the following standards: plans curriculum and instruction, delivers effective instruction, manages classroom climate and operation, promotes equity, meets professional responsibilities, and teaches and acts for social justice.

The semester prior to completing a field placement, students must formally apply and participate in an interview in the Office of Practicum Experiences and Teacher Induction before securing a field assignment.

Subject to eligibility, students submit an online application for pre-practicum and practicum experiences. Online applications are available at: www.bc.edu/content/bc/schools/lsoe/academics/practicum/Pre_Prac_.html.

All students seeking teacher licensure must complete the full practicum. A cumulative grade point average of 2.5 and successful completion of all major courses are required prior to student teaching for all students in the Elementary program. Students in Secondary Education must complete all major courses in Secondary Education and 4/5 of Arts and Sciences courses prior to student teaching. No incomplete grades may be outstanding and a minimum of 87 credits must have been completed before placement is approved. Additional information on full practicum student teaching is available at: www.bc.edu/content/bc/schools/lsoe/academics/practicum.html. All students will be screened for eligibility and any who fail to meet the standards (academic, health, professional) will be counseled into courses that will complete an appropriate degree program from Boston College. These students will not be recommended for endorsement for teacher licensure and will not receive the B.C. Endorsement. The State of Massachusetts issues teacher licenses not the endorsing university. Therefore, students who earn the B.C. Endorsement (a recommendation for licensure) submit all licensing documentation directly to the Massachusetts Department of Elementary and Secondary Education. Students will not be allowed to overload courses while student teaching. If, for any reason, a student is unable to complete the full practicum, an extended practicum (additional time in the field) will be required by arrangement of the Director of Practicum Experiences and Teacher Induction.

Application deadlines for all pre-practica are May 1 for fall placements and December 1 for spring placements. Application deadlines for all full-practica are March 15 for fall placements and October 15 for spring placements. The Office of Practicum Experiences and Teacher Induction will not be able to arrange assignments for late applicants. Application are submitted online at: www.bc.edu/content/bc/schools/lsoe/academics/practicum/Pre_Prac_.html.

The school sites utilized for pre-practica and full-practica are located in Boston and neighboring communities. Students are responsible for their own transportation to and from these facilities.

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Applied Psychology Field Practica

Applied Psychology and Human Development students should visit www.bc.edu/schools/lsoe/academics/undergrad/human_dev/APHD.html for information on practicum experiences for this major and register for APSY2152 or APSY4245 in the semester during which they will complete their field practicum experience.

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International and Special Practicum Placement Program for Undergraduate Studies

Lynch School students may participate in the International Programs described in the University Policies and Procedures section of this catalog.

The Lynch School's International and Special Practicum Placement Program offer opportunities for undergraduate coursework in a variety of foreign countries for pre- and full-practicum placements. International settings include classrooms in such countries as Switzerland, Ireland, England, France, Italy, Germany, Spain, and Mexico. Out-of-state opportunities are restricted to student teaching in San Juan Puerto Rico. For information regarding programs and requirements, contact the Director, International and Special Practicum Placement Program, Office of Practicum Experiences and Teacher Induction, Lynch School, Boston College, Campion 103, Chestnut Hill, MA, 02467-3804.

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The Honors Program

Scholarship and academic excellence are traditions at Boston College. To meet the needs of superior students, the Lynch School offers an Honors Program. Students are admitted to the Honors Program by invitation only prior to the beginning or at the end of freshman year, based on prior academic accomplishments and other criteria.

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Majors in Education

The undergraduate majors in the Lynch School, with the exception of the major in Applied Psychology and Human Development, are intended to meet the requirements for Initial Licensure as a teacher of the Massachusetts Department of Education. The Lynch School accreditation process and the Interstate Licensure Compact (ICC) facilitate licensure in other states. Licensure requirements are set by each state, however, and are subject to change. Students seeking licensure in Massachusetts must pass all appropriate tests of the Massachusetts Tests for Educator Licensure. All students must consult with the Office of Practicum Experiences and Teacher Induction and/or the Boston College Career Center to review the most recent licensure requirements of Massachusetts and other states.

The Lynch School offers three minors for Education majors—Special Education, Middle School Mathematics Teaching, and Leadership in Higher Education and Community Settings. For the Class of 2014 and beyond, the Massachusetts Department of Elementary and Secondary Education is mandating that all teacher candidates complete a specific bilingual course. Please consult the Chair of Teacher Education, Special Education, and Curriculum and Instruction or the Assistant Dean of Undergraduates at LSOE for the most current information.

The minor in Special Education is designed to prepare students to work with a diverse group of special needs learners. In light of a growing national movement for further inclusion of special needs students in regular classrooms, teachers must be able to accommodate special needs students in their classrooms. All education students are strongly urged to consider this important minor. Detailed information on the minor in Special Education can be found in the Minors section of the Lynch School catalog and on the Lynch School website.

The minor in Middle School Mathematics Teaching is available to Elementary Education majors with an Arts and Sciences Mathematics major or an Arts and Sciences Mathematics/Computer Science interdisciplinary major, or to Secondary Education majors with an Arts and Sciences Mathematics major. Teachers of middle school mathematics are in great need in the United States, and all eligible Lynch School students should investigate this option. For more information on the minor in Middle School Mathematics Teaching, consult the Minors section of the Lynch School catalog and the Lynch School website.

The minor in Management and Leadership is open only to Lynch School majors in Applied Psychology and Human Development. This minor is limited to 15 students per class and requires a specific grade point average of 3.5, a completed application, and a 250-word rationale for pursuing this minor. See the Minors section of the Lynch School catalog and the Lynch School website.

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Major in Elementary Education

The major in Elementary Education prepares students for teaching children without disabilities and children with mild disabilities in regular classrooms, grades 1–6.

The major requirements for the elementary program include foundation and professional courses. Foundation courses focus on building understanding in areas such as child growth, learning, pedagogy, and development from diverse social, cultural, and historical perspectives. Professional courses integrate theoretical and pedagogical knowledge of subject matter of the elementary classroom that includes reading, language, literature, mathematics, science, and social studies, informed by a pupil-centered perspective.

In addition to the mastery of program content, students are instructed in learning theories, instructional strategies and models, curriculum and school organizational practices, educational technology, inquiry, and effective assessment procedures and instruments.

Students also develop competencies in working with diverse learners including English language learners. Instruction enables teacher candidates to effectively integrate children with disabilities into regular classrooms. Teacher candidates have opportunities to engage in problem-solving and reflective practice, work with parents and communities, and apply knowledge to research projects.

The pre-practicum component begins at the sophomore level and culminates in full-time senior level practicum. Course and practica are carefully linked.

A second major, either interdisciplinary or in a subject discipline in Arts and Sciences or Applied Psychology and Human Development in the Lynch School, is required. Students must consult with their program advisors as to the selection and requirements for the major.

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Major in Secondary Education

The major in Secondary Education prepares students for teaching in secondary schools, grades 8–12. The major in Secondary Education is ideal for those students interested in high school teaching, who want to achieve an in-depth major in a discipline, and who want to apply elective courses to enhance the major and professional course work. Students may prepare to teach in the following disciplines: biology, chemistry, geology (earth science), physics, English, history, mathematics, Latin, and classical humanities.

Requirements for the secondary major include courses in child and adolescent development; theory and instruction in teaching diverse populations and meeting the special needs of children; teaching reading, writing, and specific subject methods courses; inquiry; and classroom assessment. The program also includes three pre-practicum experiences beginning sophomore year and culminating in a full practicum in the senior year.

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Middle School Licensure

Middle School licensure is available to Elementary and Secondary Education students by application to the Massachusetts Department of Elementary and Secondary Education via an alternate route. A special option is provided for students who plan to minor in Middle School Mathematics Teaching. Students seeking licensure to teach at the middle school level should consult the Office of Practicum Experiences and Teacher Induction.

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Major in Applied Psychology and Human Development

The major in Applied Psychology and Human Development consists of course offerings in developmental psychology, personality theories, educational psychology, and related fields. It provides a basic foundation for careers in social service and community settings or for graduate study in many fields of psychology, including counseling, developmental or educational psychology, organizational studies, business, and social work. This major prepares students for entry-level employment as support personnel in offices of senior professional psychologists and counselors, and in settings such as child/adult residential or day care facilities and alternative educational, community, or business settings. Ten courses or a minimum of 30 credits are required for the major.

This requirement is for the Class of 2014 and beyond: The Applied Psychology and Human Development major for students in the Class of 2014 and beyond requires five specified courses and five additional courses selected from one of the following concentrations: Human Services, Organization Studies, and Community, Advocacy and Social Policy. Each concentration includes 2-3 specified courses and/or 2-3 electives.

The Applied Psychology and Human Development major does not provide for state licensure as a classroom teacher.

Students who are pursuing Applied Psychology and Human Development as their primary major within the Lynch School, regardless of class year, are required to complete coursework in one of the following:

  • a minor of six courses in a single subject discipline in Arts and Sciences, in Management and Leadership in the Carroll School of Management, in Leadership in Higher Education and Community Settings in the Lynch School, or in Medical Humanities, Health and Culture in the College of Arts and Sciences. Please note: the minor in Management and Leadership is limited to 15 students per class and requires a specific grade point average, rationale, and application.
  • a major or an interdisciplinary minor (e.g., African and African Diaspora Studies, Women's Studies) in Arts and Sciences; or
  • a second major or interdisciplinary major in the Lynch School.

The minimum number of credits acceptable for most minors is 18, which may include applicable Core courses. The minor in Special Education (which does not satisfy the required minor for students in Applied Psychology and Human Development), however, requires only 12 credits. This is an excellent option as a second minor for Applied Psychology and Human Development majors interested in special needs settings. The minor in Management and Leadership, offered in collaboration with the Carroll School of Management, is another excellent option for students planning to work in business or industry. The Lynch School also offers an interdisciplinary minor in Leadership in Higher Education and Community Settings. Students who have a second major automatically fulfill the minor requirement. Approved areas of study for both majors and minors are listed under the College of Arts and Sciences, with acceptable interdisciplinary majors listed above.

Additional detailed information for Applied Psychology and Human Development majors is available on the Lynch School website, www.bc.edu/schools/lsoe/academics/undergrad/human_dev/APHD.html. There is a link at the bottom of this page for details about course requirements. There are also links from this page to a list of faculty who teach in the program, field practicum courses, supporting fields of study, and study abroad opportunities, as well as information about future career choices. It is strongly recommended that all students pursue a field practicum course which includes ten hours a week of volunteer work in community, business, or human service agencies or programs, and a weekly seminar. Links to existing sites are available on the web and can be discussed with the Coordinator of the Applied Psychology and Human Development Program or the Assistant Dean for Undergraduate Students.

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Second Majors and Interdisciplinary Majors for Lynch School Students

All students in the Lynch School pursuing an Education major leading to licensure are required to complete a second major in Arts and Sciences or an interdisciplinary major as outlined below. Applied Psychology and Human Development majors are also required to carry a minor of 18 credits in a single subject discipline in Arts and Sciences, a major or an interdisciplinary minor in Arts and Sciences, or a second major or interdisciplinary major in the Lynch School. Acceptable interdisciplinary majors are listed below.

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Lynch School Majors

Interdisciplinary Majors

Interdisciplinary majors are based in two or more Arts and Sciences disciplines that are relevant to teaching in elementary school settings. Each of these majors is available to students in the Lynch School pursuing Elementary Education and Applied Psychology and Human Development. Students should consult their advisors regarding the specific courses required for these interdisciplinary majors.

Note: Secondary Education students cannot become licensed to teach in any of these interdisciplinary areas. Secondary licensure requires an Arts and Sciences major in one of the specific subject disciplines listed under the description of Secondary Education requirements.

Applied Psychology and Human Development majors may choose a second major or one of the interdisciplinary majors listed below in place of their A&S minor requirement.

American Heritages

Recommended for students who are interested in the American heritage from literary and historical perspectives. Two tracks are available for students pursuing this major, a cultural track with emphasis in the literary perspective, and a social science track for students interested in historical and sociological perspectives.

Applied Psychology and Human Development

Provides students with a background in the fields of counseling, developmental, and educational psychology. This major is particularly appropriate for students seeking a deeper understanding of the relationships between psychology and education and between schools and other social services, community agencies, and public and private organizations, including business.

General Science

Designed for students seeking a broad and general background in science to help them teach in an elementary or special education setting. Nine courses are required from four science departments—Biology, Chemistry, Physics, and Earth and Environmental Sciences (Geosciences).

Mathematics/Computer Science

This major is recommended for students who have had four years of high school mathematics and wish to specialize in the area of mathematics and computer science but who are not interested in the traditional Mathematics major because of their intended career objective as elementary, early childhood, or special needs educators. Many students who complete this interdisciplinary major in conjunction with Applied Psychology and Human Development or Elementary Education go on to acquire licensure to teach mathematics at the secondary level by fulfilling Master’s Degree requirements in Secondary Education through the Fifth Year Program.

Perspectives on Spanish America

Recommended for students who may have had at least two years of high school Spanish and wish to develop Spanish language skills, this minor coupled with a background in the historical, sociological, and literary traditions of Hispanic cultures.

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Minors in the Lynch School

Minors for Lynch School Students

All Lynch School majors may minor in Special Education, as well as any Arts and Sciences discipline. A minor consists of 6 three-credit courses. Some Lynch School Elementary and Secondary Education majors are eligible to minor in Middle School Mathematics Teaching (see details below.). Lynch School Applied Psychology and Human Development majors may apply for the minor in Organizational Studies–Human Resource Management. These minors are described below.

Minor in Middle School Mathematics Teaching

The minor in Middle School Mathematics Teaching is available only to Lynch School undergraduate students who are Elementary Education majors with an Arts and Sciences Mathematics major or a Mathematics/Computer Science interdisciplinary major, or Secondary Education majors with an Arts and Sciences Mathematics major.

Interested students must complete a Middle School Mathematics Minor form and submit it to the Associate Director (Campion 104). While the minor in Middle School Mathematics Teaching does not directly lead to middle school mathematics licensure through the Lynch School, it does fulfill the National Council of Teachers of Mathematics requirements for middle school teachers of mathematics. Students seeking licensure to teach at the middle school level should consult the Office of Professional Practicum Experiences and Teacher Induction.

A listing of specific course requirements may be obtained from the Lynch School Office for Undergraduate Student Services.

Minor in Management and Leadership

The minor in Management and Leadership, offered by the Carroll School of Management is only open to Lynch School Applied Psychology and Human Development majors in the Class of 2016 and beyond. This minor is especially applicable to Applied Psychology and Human Development majors who are interested in pursuing a career in personnel work or organizational studies. Students must apply and be accepted into this minor and may submit applications during their sophomore year. The minor is limited to fifteen students.

Minor in Special Education

All Lynch School undergraduate majors may minor in Special Education, and any Lynch School student who has an interest in special needs education is encouraged to pursue this minor. Note: Applied Psychology and Human Development majors in the Lynch School may declare the Special Education minor in addition to the required Arts and Sciences minor. Interested students must complete a Declaration of Major form and submit it to the Associate Director (Campion 104). While the minor in Special Education does not lead to licensure as a special needs teacher, students can pursue fifth year programs that lead to licensure as a Teacher of Students with Special Needs (pre-K to grade 9 and grades 5-12) or as a Teacher of Students with Low Incidence Disabilities (including severe disabilities, visual impairments, deaf/blindness, and multiple disabilities). The minor in Special Education is not available to students outside of the Lynch School.

Teaching English Language Learners (TELL/ESL) Certification

Although the Lynch School currently offers a certificate in Teaching English Language Learners, this course of study is under modification due to changing education licensure requirements.  Candidates should hold or be working toward a licensure in an education field (early childhood, elementary, secondary, reading, and others). This program is designed to prepare teachers to work with bilingual learners/English Language Learners in their mainstream classroom settings. The certificate requires two courses. In addition, candidates need to complete a field experience in a classroom that includes bilingual learners.

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Minor in the Carroll School of Management for Lynch School of Education Students

The Department of Management and Organization offers a minor in Management and Leadership to a limited number of Lynch School Applied Psychology and Human Development majors who are interested in pursuing a career in human resources or organization studies. The minor consists of six courses in the Carroll School of Management: two required courses (MGMT1021 or MGMT1031 and MGMT1127) and four electives, chosen from among all CSOM course offerings. Applications for the CSOM minor are available in the Office for Undergraduate Student Services, Campion 104 and 106D.

Minors for College of Arts and Sciences Majors

Some Arts and Sciences majors are eligible to minor in Secondary Teaching (see more information below). All Arts and Sciences majors may minor in General Education. More information on these minors appears below.

Inclusive Education Minor

The Department of Teacher Education, Special Education, and Curriculum & Instruction (LSOE) offers the Inclusive Education minor for students enrolled in the College of Arts and Sciences. The minor is designed to (1) introduce Arts and Sciences students to the world of disabilities and special education, with an emphasis on special education practice; and (2) enhance the ability of future professionals to meet the needs of an increasingly diverse population of students in America’s schools. Classes address the nature and implications of disabilities as well as effective practices in special education. The minor consists of six courses and a zero-credit field observation.

Minor in Secondary Education

Students who are pursuing a major in biology, chemistry, geology (earth science), physics, English, history, mathematics, or Latin and classical studies in the College of Arts and Sciences may apply to minor in Secondary Education. Note: This minor is only open to eligible College of Arts and Sciences undergraduate students. This program begins in the sophomore year, and interested students should apply before the end of sophomore year. Only those students majoring in the approved disciplines listed above may apply for a minor in Secondary Education. This minor leads to state licensure in all areas listed. Students seeking licensure in Massachusetts must pass the Massachusetts Tests for Educator Licensure (MTEL). NB: Students must complete all the requirements of the University Core and the College of Arts and Sciences major.

Before submitting an application, interested students should meet with the Assistant Director of the Arts and Sciences Advising Center in Campion 106D or the Associate Director in Campion 104.

Minor in General Education

All undergraduate students in the Connell School of Nursing, College of Arts and Sciences, and Carroll School of Management who have an interest in Education may pursue a minor of six courses. Note: This minor is not available to Lynch School students.

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Minors for Carroll School of Management Majors

All Carroll School majors may minor in Applied Psychology and Human Development for Carroll School Majors or General Education. More information on these minors is listed below.

Minor in Applied Psychology and Human Development

The Lynch School of Education, in cooperation with the Carroll School of Management, offers an 18-credit minor in Applied Psychology and Human Development, which is open to fifteen Carroll School undergraduates each year. This minor may interest you if you wish to (1) deepen your knowledge of human behavior in the areas of psychology, human development, and learning in preparation for a career in fields such as human resource management, marketing research, or advertising; (2) gain specialized knowledge in certain specific areas of human resources management, for example: counseling, training, personnel assessment, family crisis assistance, drug, and alcohol abuse programs, and aging/elderly care; or (3) prepare for employment in a government or private sector social services organization.

Minor in General Education

All Carroll School of Management majors (as well as all Connell School of Nursing and Arts and Sciences majors) may minor in General Education. See more information about this minor at the end of the Minors section.

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Minors for Connell School of Nursing Majors

All Connell School of Nursing majors may minor in General Education. More information about this minor is below.

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Minors for Connell School of Nursing, College of Arts and Sciences, and Carroll School of Management Majors

Minor in General Education

All undergraduate students in the Connell School of Nursing, College of Arts and Sciences, and Carroll School of Management who have an interest in Education may pursue a minor of six courses with their advisor’s approval. Note: This minor is not available to Lynch School students.

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Minor for the Lynch School of Education, Connell School of Nursing, College of Arts and Sciences, and Carroll School of Management Majors

Minor in Leadership in Higher Education and Community Settings

The minor in Leadership in Higher Education and Community Settings is offered by the Lynch School of Education and is open to students in the Lynch School of Education, the College of Arts and Sciences, the Connell School of Nursing, and the Carroll School of Management. Beginning with the Class of 2016, this minor serves students who are interested in college student development and in the applications of psychology to work settings in institutions of higher education, in local and international Non-government Organizations (NGOs) and/or in community-based programs. Interested students may inquire and submit applications, by October 15, in Campion Hall 104.

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Fifth Year and Early Admit Programs

For Boston College Juniors

The Fifth Year and Early Admit Programs offer academically outstanding Boston College juniors a unique opportunity to begin graduate study during their undergraduate senior year, allowing them to graduate with a bachelor’s and master's degree in a shortened amount of time.

None of the 120 credits required for the bachelor's degree may be counted toward a Fifth Year Program. In consultation with an advisor, a graduate level course may be added each semester, on to the student's senior-year schedule.

All undergraduate juniors in the Lynch School of Education, College of Arts and Sciences, Connell School of Nursing, and Carroll School of Management are eligible to apply for these programs. (*See additional Early Admit requirements below)

Fifth Year Programs are available in:

  • Early Childhood, Elementary, or Secondary Teaching
  • Curriculum & Instruction
  • Moderate Special Needs (mild/moderate learning disabilities, developmental disabilities, and behavior disorders)
  • Severe Special Needs (including visually impaired, deaf/blindness, and multiple disabilities)
  • Higher Education
  • Educational Research, Measurement, and Evaluation
  • Applied Developmental and Educational Psychology

There may be limited federal financial assistance for some graduate programs in Severe Special Needs and Secondary Science Teaching.

Early Admit Programs are available in Mental Health Counseling and School Counseling. Given the amount of credits required for licensing in Mental Health and School Counseling, both Early Admit Program and students admitted directly into the M.A. programs typically need six years to complete their B.A. and license-eligible M.A. Mental Health degree (60 credits) or School Counseling (48 credits). The main advantages of the Early Admit Program are (1) BC juniors receive early provisional admittance into these M.A. programs, and (2) complete two master's-level courses during senior year.

Students interested in a Fifth Year or Early Admit Program should consult with the Lynch School Office for Graduate Student Services, Campion 135, during the fall semester of their junior year. Without proper advisement and early acceptance into a master's degree program, students will be unable to complete the program in five years.

A special master's degree program in Social Work program is also available for a limited number of students pursuing a B.A. in Applied Psychology and Human Development. Students should consult the Graduate School of Social Work for information on requirements, prerequisites, and application at the beginning of their sophomore year. Students interested in this 3/2 program in Applied Psychology and Human Development/Social Work should apply to the Graduate School of Social Work before the end of their sophomore year. Please contact the Office of Admissions, Graduate School of Social Work, Boston College, McGuinn Hall, Chestnut Hill, Massachusetts 02467, 617-552-4024.

*Students who have completed some psychology-related coursework, have at least a 3.5 GPA, and have completed some type of practical, field-based or helping experience (e.g., residential advisor, camp counselor, hotline operator, youth worker, etc.), either volunteer or paid, are strong candidates for this program.

Application Process

  • Students must apply by March 1 of their junior year.
  • Applicants must meet all graduate admission requirements.
  • Download the Application Checklist.
  • The application fee is waived for applicants to the Fifth Year and Early Admit Programs.
  • Notification of approval to begin the program is usually made in May by the Office of Graduate Admission.
  • If students are in a study-abroad program during their junior year but are still interested in one of these programs, they should contact the Office of Graduate Admission gsoe@bc.edu or (617) 552-4214.
  • If an applicant is not offered admission into the program, they are welcome to re-apply to the Master's program upon completion of their undergraduate degree.

Full Graduate Student Status

Upon successful graduation from the undergraduate program, Fifth Year and Early Admit students will be advanced to full graduate student status if they have maintained good academic standing (including a 3.5 or higher in their two graduate courses). Early admit students will also need to have engaged in field experience as described above. Students should submit their transcripts and documentation of any additional service work if the work was not previously documented in their application for the Fifth Year and Early Admit programs. Upon final admission, the student will receive an official letter of acceptance into the full master's program by the Office of Graduate Admission (gsoe@bc.edu or 617-552-4214).

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