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Addition to the Bobbie Hanvey Photo Archive:
International Eucharistic Congress 2012

09/06/12
Altar at Final Day Ceremony

The University Libraries are pleased to announce the addition of over 500 new photographs to the Bobbie Hanvey Photographic Archives. The photographs, taken on June 17, 2012, document the final day of the 50th International Eucharistic Congress held in Dublin, Ireland. 

A slideshow of highlights is available through the Burns Library Flickr Collection. The entire set of new photos is available through the Libraries’ Digital Collections repository.

This year’s congress was held in Dublin, Ireland, at Croke Park’s Gaelic Athletic Association stadium. The congress attracted approximately 250,000 participants representing five continents, with masses, prayers and liturgical celebrations held in seven languages.

Hanvey’s photographs capture the festivities and participants, including women religious, bishops, volunteers, stewards, garda siochana (police), Eucharistic ministers, as well as the altar on a large stage with the main celebrant the Papal Legate, His Eminence Marc, Cardinal Ouellet and the concelebrants.

The International Eucharistic Congress convenes for eight days once every four years. It is a gathering of clergy, religious, and laity, that takes place in a part of the world chosen by Church leaders. It aims to promote an awareness of the central place of the Eucharist in the life and mission of the Catholic Church, help improve understanding and celebration of the liturgy, and draw attention to the social dimension of the Eucharist. This year’s celebration was significant as it coincided with the 50th anniversary of the inauguration of the Second Vatican Congress.  

Bobbie Hanvey is an award-winning photographer living and working in Northern Ireland. The John J. Burns Library acquired the first part of the Bobbie Hanvey Photographic Archives in 2001, with major additions to the collection made in 2008, 2009, 2011, and 2012.  This most recent addition is the first set of digital photographs be made available to the public.