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Afghanistan After 2014

Coordinators

afghanistan after 2014

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Kathleen Bailey
Adjunct Associate Professor
Political Science, Boston College

t: 617.552.4170 | e: kathleen.bailey@bc.edu

Kathleen Bailey's research interests lie in the area of ethnic and regional politics with a focus on the former Soviet space, especially Uzbekistan and Central Asia. She is the author of the forthcoming Clan and Politics in Uzbekistan. Professor Bailey teaches courses on Moslem regions, including Central Eurasia, the Middle Civilization and the Balkans. She is the Associate Director of the Islamic Civilizations and Societies Program at Boston College, which offers an undergraduate Major and Minor in the field. Her current research focuses on leadership and regional elites in Central Asia.



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Ali Banuazizi
Professor
Political Science, Boston College

Ali Banuazizi's scholarly interests include political cultures of the Middle East; comparative study of religion, civil society, and politics in the Middle East; and Iran’s social history and contemporary domestic politics and foreign relations. Professor Banuazizi is currently the Director of the Program in Islamic Civilization and Societies (ICS) and Chair of the International Studies Academic Advisory Board at Boston College. He is a past President of the Middle East Studies Association (MESA) and the International Society for Iranian Studies (ISIS). He has held visiting appointments at Princeton, Harvard, Hebrew University of Jerusalem, M.I.T., and Oxford University.



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Timothy W. Crawford
Associate Professor and Director of Undergraduate Studies
Political Science, Boston College

Timothy W. Crawford teaches courses on international security, causes of war, the United Nations, and intelligence. His research interests include coercive diplomacy, alliance politics, international intelligence cooperation, and executive power in U.S. foreign policy. His current project focuses on the strategy and politics of dividing alliances in the first and second world wars.

He is the author of Pivotal Deterrence: Third Party Statecraft and the Pursuit of Peace (Cornell, 2003), which was the winner of the 2003 Edgar S. Furniss Book Award. He is also co-editor with Alan J. Kuperman of Gambling on Humanitarian Intervention: Moral Hazard, Rebellion, and Civil War (Routledge, 2006).

Before joining the faculty at Boston College, Crawford taught courses at Columbia University and in the Security Studies Program at Georgetown University. He has held fellowships at the Brookings Institution, Princeton University’s Center of International Studies, and on Harvard University’s Olin Institute of Strategic Studies, and was a Council on Foreign Relations term member. Crawford serves on the board of directors of America Abroad Media, and the governing council of the International Security and Arms Control section of the American Political Science Association.



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Jennifer L. Erickson
Assistant Professor
Political Science, Boston College

Jennifer L. Erickson is an Assistant Professor of Political Science and International Studies at Boston College. Her research sits at the intersection of international security, political economy, and global governance. Her current research projects deal with international reputation and small and major conventional arms transfer controls to human rights violators and conflict zones; sanctions and arms embargoes; and the use of conventional weapons as an incentive to discourage nuclear weapons proliferation. She has published articles on the European arms trade, compliance with arms embargoes, and the UN Arms Trade Treaty process.

Erickson has conducted extensive fieldwork in the United States and Europe, where she was a research fellow at the Stiftung Wissenschaft und Politik (SWP) and the Wissenchaftszentrum (WZB) in Berlin. She has also been a Research Fellow at Dartmouth College in the War and Peace Studies Program at the John Sloan Dickey Center for International Understanding and is currently a faculty affiliate at the Institute for Quantitative Social Science at Harvard University. She has a B.A. in Political Science from St. Olaf College and a Ph.D. in Government from Cornell University.



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Peter Krause
Assistant Professor
Political Science, Boston College

Peter Krause’s research and writing focuses on international security, Middle East politics, non-state violence, and national movements. He is currently completing his book manuscript on the political effectiveness of national movements, as well as articles on the structure of national movements and the threat of internal strife by non-state actors for political gain. He has previously published articles on the effectiveness of non-state violence, U.S. intervention in the Syrian civil war, the politics of division within the Palestinian national movement, the war of ideas in the Middle East, and a reassessment of U.S. operations at Tora Bora in 2001.

Krause has conducted extensive fieldwork throughout the Middle East over the past five years. He currently teaches “International Relations of the Middle East,” “Terrorism, Insurgency, and Political Violence,” and “Introduction to International Studies” at Boston College. He is a faculty associate in the International Studies Program and the Islamic Civilization and Societies Program at Boston College, as well as a research affiliate with the MIT Security Studies Program.

Before joining the faculty at Boston College, Krause was formerly a Research Fellow at the Crown Center for Middle East Studies of Brandeis University, as well as a Research Fellow at the Belfer Center for Science and International Affairs of the Harvard Kennedy School.



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Gary Winslett
Graduate Assistant

Gary Winslett is a third-year Ph.D. Candidate in the Political Science Department specializing in International Relations. His doctoral research focuses on the domestic sources of foreign policy with a particular emphasis on political party competition.



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Lauren Gray
Undergraduate Assistant

Lauren is a senior History major at Boston College. This past summer, she interned in the New York City office of U.S. Senator Kirsten Gillibrand. She has a growing interest in Central Asian and Middle Eastern politics and hopes to engage with these areas further following graduation in May. She hopes to work in a policy capacity for the State Department or an international NGO.