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The Clough Center for the Study of Constitutional Democracy

Constitutionalism and Coercion

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Thursday, February 21, 2013
Reception at 4:00 p.m., Program at 4:30 p.m.
Barat House, Boston College Law School

with Frederick Schauer
David and Mary Harrison Distinguished Professor of Law at the University of Virginia


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Speaker Bio


 

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Frederick Schauer is a David and Mary Harrison Distinguished Professor of Law at the University of Virginia. He is the author of The Law of Obscenity (BNA, 1976), Free Speech: A Philosophical Enquiry (Cambridge, 1982), Playing By the Rules: A Philosophical Examination of Rule-Based Decision-Making in Law and in Life (Clarendon/Oxford, 1991), Profiles, Probabilities, and Stereotypes (Belknap/Harvard, 2003), and Thinking Like a Lawyer: A New Introduction to Legal Reasoning (Harvard, 2009) and of numerous articles on constitutional law and theory, freedom of speech and press, legal reasoning and the philosophy of law. Schauer is a fellow of the American Academy of Arts and Sciences, has held a Guggenheim Fellowship, has been vice-president of the American Society for Political and Legal Philosophy and chair of the Committee on Philosophy and Law of the American Philosophical Association, and was a founding co-editor of the journal Legal Theory. He has also been the Fischel-Neil Distinguished Visiting Professor of Law at the University of Chicago, Ewald Distinguished Visiting Professor of Law at the University of Virginia, Morton Distinguished Visiting Professor of the Humanities at Dartmouth College, Distinguished Visiting Professor of Law at the University of Toronto, and Distinguished Visitor at the New York University School of Law. In 2007-08 Schauer was the George Eastman Visiting Professor at Oxford University and a fellow of Balliol College.

A graduate of Dartmouth College, the Amos Tuck School of Business Administration, and Harvard Law School, Schauer was the recipient of a university-wide Distinguished Teacher Award from Harvard University in 2004. Before arriving at UVA, he served for 18 years as Frank Stanton Professor of the First Amendment at the John F. Kennedy School of Government, Harvard University, where he also served as academic dean and acting dean, and was a professor of law at the University of Michigan.