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Boisi Center for Religion and American Public Life

Latinos and the 2012 Elections

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Susan Eckstein, Boston University
Luis Lugo
, Pew Forum on Religion & Public Life
Alan Wolfe, Boston College
Moderated by Erik Owens, Boston College

Date: Thursday, November 1, 2012
Time: 5:30-7:00pm
Location: Higgins 310, Boston College

 

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Susan Eckstein is professor of sociology and international relations at Boston University. She specializes in urbanization, immigration, poverty, rights and injustices, and social movements in the context of third world countries. She is primarily interested in Latin America and has written most extensively on Mexico, Cuba, and Bolivia. Her publications include The Immigrant Divide: How Cuban Americans Changed the U.S. and their Homeland (2009); Back from the Future: Cuba under Castro (1994); and The Poverty of Revolution: The State and Urban Poor in Mexico (1977). She received her B.A. from Beloit College and Ph.D. in sociology from Columbia University.

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Luis E. Lugo is director of the Pew Forum on Religion & Public Life, a project of the Pew Research Center. During his tenure the Pew Forum has become a leading non-partisan research organization on issues at the intersection of religion and public affairs. In addition to its many research reports and public events, the Pew Forum is now known for its landmark surveys on religion in the United States (the U.S. Religious Landscape Survey, the U.S. Religious Knowledge Survey, and surveys of Muslim Americans and Latinos) and around the world (with special emphasis on global Pentecostalism and on sub-Saharan Africans). As part of the Pew-Templeton Global Religious Futures project, the Pew Forum also now studies the size, distribution and projected growth of the world’s religious populations, and it produces an annual analysis of the level of religious restrictions in 198 countries. Prior to leading the Pew Forum, Lugo served as director of the religion program at The Pew Charitable trusts in Philadelphia and was a professor of political science for more than twelve years before that. Among his published works are several edited volumes, including Sovereignty at the Crossroads? Morality and International Politics in the Post-Cold War Era (1996) and Religion, Public Life and the American Polity (1995). A Native of Cuba, he received his B.A. from University of Memphis, his M.A. from Villanova University, and his Ph.D. in Political Science from University of Chicago.

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Alan Wolfe is the founding director of the Boisi Center and Professor of Political Science at Boston College. He is author of more than a dozen books, including, most recently, Political Evil: What It Is and How to Combat It (2011), The Future of Liberalism (2009), Does American Democracy Still Work? (2006), Return to Greatness (2005), The Transformation of American Religion: How We actually Practice our Faith (2003), Moral Freedom (2001) and One Nation After All (1999). Widely considered one of the nation's most prominent public intellectuals, he is a frequent contributor to the New York Times, Washington Post, The New Republic and The Atlantic, and has delivered lectures across the United States and Europe.

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