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Interdisciplinary Faculty Seminars

jesuit institute

A university is a place where scholars talk to one another. A university is as vital as these conversations. Hence the Institute sponsors a considerable number of interdisciplinary faculty seminars and international seminars. The interdisciplinary faculty seminars meet regularly to address from a variety of disciplines the issues that emerge in the encounter between faith and culture. The seminars continue for some three to four years and have typically resulted in a volume of essays or a scholarly journal or an international conference or a set of lectures. Examples of these seminars follow. If you are interested in attending, or discussing the possibility of creating a new seminar please contact Patti Donnelland at (617) 552-8290.

ALIENATION OF INTELLECTUALS FROM RELIGION WITHIN AMERICAN CULTURE

The seminar explores the widespread alienation from religion among American intellectuals and professional elites in media. It addresses a cultural climate that has rendered many in these communities hostile, skeptical, or indifferent to religious claims and has fostered a dismissal of religious discourse or institutions. This seminar attempts to gauge this situation, i.e., to explore its originating influences, the various forms in which it exists, and its present consequences within American culture.

JEWISH / CHRISTIAN RELATIONS

On April 23, 1998, the Jesuit Institute sponsored a public discussion entitled "The Holocaust: Remembering for the Future," an event which generated widespread interest. Faculty members from various departments within the University formed a seminar to continue the discussions with a collaborative analysis of the present state of Jewish / Christian relations and of the theologies by which each community understands itself and its relationship the the other.

JUNIOR SCHOLARS IN CONVERSATION

A seminar, designed to integrate junior faculty members into the BC academic community by providing a forum for them to discuss their own work in progress. The idea is to demonstrate how research and collaborative interchange are possible in a modern university, and how it is valuable for us to have opportunities to talk about the interconnections between our lives, our teaching, and our research and writing projects, sharing our work even across the disciplinary boundaries that define the modern university. To read the December 2, 2004 Chronicle article about this program please click on the following site,

/bc_org/rvp/pubaf/chronicle/v13/d2/clooney.html

MEANING AND TRANSCENDENCE

This seminar addresses the questions surrounding the apparent absence of meaning inherent in the 20th Century's loss of traditional ethics and belief systems. The participants in this seminar strive to find the value still available in the narrative of the new millennium by exploring the forms of meaning, transcendence and ethical value to be found in the arts and thought of the 21st century and beyond.