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Boston College Center for Work & Family


The New Dad: A Portrait of Today's Father (2015) This report reviews BCCWF research as well as the work of other leading scholars to paint a more nuanced picture of today's new dad. The report is framed around the Top Ten questions we are asked about our fatherhood research.


The New Dad: Take Your Leave (2014) The study explores different perspectives on paternity leave, including a survey of fathers,  a benchmarking study of paternity leave policies at leading organizations, and a review of global paternity leave policies and practices, as well as U.S. states that have enacted laws to provide paid parental leave.  Executive Summary


The New Dad: A Work (and Life) in Progress  (2013) summarizes the findings from the three prior Fatherhood studies. Please visit the for additional information on all the CWF fatherhood studies and follow-on actions.


The New Dad: Right at Home (2012), the center’s third report on fathers, observes the impact of shifting gender roles through in-depth interviews with 31 at-home dads and surveys with 23 of their spouses.


The New Dad: Caring, Committed and Conflicted  (2011) contains the results of a quantitative study of nearly 1000 fathers working in four diverse Fortune 500 companies. 


The New Dad: Exploring Fatherhood within a Career Context (2010) is based on qualitative interview with 33 new fathers with children 3 to 18 months in age. It explores how these recent fathers were adjusting to their increased family responsibilities and how those were impacting their view of their careers and their responsibilities at home.


Defining Paternity Leave: Shifting Roles, New Responsibilities in the Family and the Workplace (2004) is an executive briefing that summarizes the business impact of shifting gender roles, provides parental leave best practices from leading employers, and suggests solutions and strategies for addressing common roadblocks to implementing and increasing usage of paternity leave. PowerPoint presentation