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The Clough Center for the Study of Constitutional Democracy

Civic Internship Grant Recipients: 2015

the clough center for the study of constitutional democracy

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Michael Alario

I was born March 3, 1996 to Robert and Patricia Alario in Boston, MA. I grew up in Lunenburg, MA and attended Julie Country Day, St. Leo’s Elementary School and Saint Bernards Central Catholic High School. I first became involved in government in middle school when I ran for and won position on the student body government. In high school I was involved in the drama club, National Honors Society, a two sport athlete and captain, football and lacrosse, the president of campus ministry and the President of my class, which I did for all four years. At Boston College I am a member of both the Appalachia volunteers and the Rosie's Place 4Boston placement, which is a homeless and advocacy center for women. I attended the ACC Advocacy day where I lobbied both Congressional staffers and members for higher education funding on behalf of Boston College. I am a democracy coach with Boston College’s Generation Citizen chapter, where I taught an action civics course twice a week at Brighton High School. I pursued an internship with Congressman McGovern because I found his principles to align well with my own. I along with other members of Campus Ministry and NHS ran a food drive and invited Congressman to speak about his End Hunger Now Campaign, and ever since then I have been interested in the cause. As an intern in the District Office I will have a wide range responsibilities. I will serve as the liaison between the Congressman and his constituency, both reporting concerns to the Congressman and providing information to the people of the second district. I will be in charge of staffing certain events providing outreach and facilitating meetings for Congressman McGovern. I will play a role in the drafting and approval of grant funding. This will include writing proposals for legislation and reviewing programs requesting already appropriated funds. Per the request of my supervisors, I will conduct research about specific issues pertaining to the district such as homelessness, veteran affairs and hunger. This research will consist of both collecting data from the people of the district, interpreting the trends, and analyzing the result. I will also be actively engaged in the community joining the Congressman while he is in the district. These experiences are where I will have the opportunity to directly serve my community. This may include traveling to farmers, factories and other industry within the district as well as the nonprofit and governmental organizations involved with the Congressman’s mission.


 
Samuel Beard

Samuel Beard

My name is Samuel Beard and I was born and raised in Woodland Hills, California, a suburb of Los Angeles. I am a rising senior at Boston College with a major in History and a minor in both Environmental Studies and International Studies. I have a passion for adventure and travel and have just returned from a semester abroad on a sailboat studying the environmental and social history of the Caribbean as well as participating in traditional sail training. At Boston College I am a part of the Animal Alliance Club and volunteer weekly at the Gifford Cat Shelter. I have also been a part of Appalachia Volunteers and worked at the Suffolk County House of Corrections through Boston College’s PULSE Program. During my time at the prison I tutored inmates in preparation for the GED and acted as a teachers aid in classes such as Parenting 101 and Freedom from Violence. Through this experience I gained an appreciation of the importance of education and the necessity of its availability. Many of the inmates that I interacted with failed to receive the attention necessary for them to succeed academically. Because these inmates did not receive a complete education their career options were limited both before and after their time in prison thus leading to cycles of crime and poverty.

This summer I will be working with Breakthrough Greater Boston a program that aims to support underserved students achieve academic success. I will be tasked with supporting breakthrough students and teachers as well as conducting advocacy work on behalf of Breakthrough students. As a program intern I will be acting as a liaison between the Breakthrough program, its students, and their parents. I will also be charged with organizing and planning community events and will assist in the recruitment of students and teachers. I will work directly with students as a one on one tutor and will organize student data and progress with the use of tracking software. Additionally, I will oversee outreach efforts with local schools, universities, and businesses and will also oversee many of the daily events that occur at the program such as attendance, food distribution, inventory, test logistics and various other tasks.

My career interests revolve education and education policy. After I graduate from Boston College I hope to participate in a program such as Teach for America or maybe teach abroad for a year or two before I go back to graduate school for education and move forward with my career.


 
Julia Biango

Julia Biango

My name is Julia Biango, a junior here at Boston College. I am originally from Myrtle Beach, South Carolina. I graduated from Socastee High School in 2012. After exploring the International Baccalaureate (IB) program and receiving an IB diploma in high school, I decided that I wanted to pursue a study of international relations and social justice. After gaining admittance into the International Studies program at BC, I am now a double major in philosophy and international studies (ethics and social justice track). As a freshman I joined the Jamaica Magis service trip and I returned last year as a leader. As a tutor with 4Boston at Rosie’s Place, I helped a native Spanish speaker develop greater confidence and facility in English. Last fall, I won the McGillicuddy Logue scholarship to study in South Africa. While in Cape Town I volunteered with Shawco as a mentor for primary school children in the township of Manenberg. Since coming back to BC, I was a Martin Luther King Jr. Scholarship finalist and have been accepted into the International Assistant program in which I will help incoming international students adjust and to their time and transition into life at BC more smoothly.

Fortunately this summer I will be a part Non-Profit Management Internship program at the AES World Languages and Cultures Institute as an Executive Coordinator intern. The AES World Languages and Cultures Institute is a nonprofit organization whose mission is to facilitate cultural integration through the promotion of linguistic and cultural understanding. AES World Institute uses language as a way to empower the local community, especially those community members who struggle economically, socially, or politically due to communication issues. They do so through immersion language classes in English, Spanish Italian, and Mandarin for both professionals and for those who are interested in learning a new language. AES World Languages and Cultures Institute is partnered with other organizations in the community, such as housing developments and community learning centers, to provide accessible and effective ESOL classes to LEP communities in the Boston area. My position will give me the opportunity to work with all the departments of the organization as well as work closely with the Executive Director. I will be responsible for managing both projects and teams of interns while assisting in the completion of tasks when necessary. My time at AES World Languages and Cultures Institute will allow me the opportunity to work closely with the civic community through the medium of social justice work.

I hope transform my passion for social justice into a career objective through non-profit work. My interest in the non-profit sector also translates into a more concentrated goal that focuses on international development and grassroots projects in underdeveloped regions. The Clough Center’s Civic Internship Grant is allowing me the opportunity to gain valuable experience in the non-profit sector, which will help further guide and direct my passion for non-profit work. For that I am extremely grateful. 


 

Miles Casey

Myles Casey

Myles Casey is a junior at Boston College studying philosophy and political science. He grew up in Whitman, Massachusetts, a small town in the southeastern part of the commonwealth, and graduated from Whitman-Hanson Regional High School. Throughout high school he was very active in local politics, volunteering for and having several leadership positions on various campaigns throughout the southern part of the commonwealth.

At BC he is a member of the Fulton Debating Society and has held numerous executive positions for the College Republicans of BC, most recently serving as the club’s Vice President. During the most recent 2014 midterm elections, Myles consecutively managed two state representative races, overseeing nearly all aspects of the day-to-day workings of these political campaigns.

This summer he will continue with his passion for politics by serving as a policy research intern for State Representative Geoff Diehl, the ranking Republican member of the state’s Ways and Means Committee, at the Massachusetts State House. He hopes this experience will give him the opportunity to help formulate and lobby for some important pieces of legislation that will impact the state he has always called home. Myles started his political involvement as a freshman in high school by interning for Representative Diehl’s first campaign where he helped successfully beat a several-term incumbent. Consequently, he is thrilled to be working for the Representative this summer.

After graduation, Myles hopes to stay at BC for a fifth year in order to obtain a Masters of Philosophy. He will eventually like to go to Law School with the aim of combining his love of public policy and law, with his passion for philosophy and ethics by hopefully becoming a judge.


 

George Cortina

George Cortina

My name is George Cortina and I am a senior at Boston College in the Morrissey School of Arts and Sciences with a major in Political Science and a minor in History. I was born and raised in Miami, Florida and graduated from Belen Jesuit Preparatory School. I have always had a love for politics and am hoping to be able to make an impact in our political system. Last summer, I interned in Congressman Carlos Curbelo’s congressional campaign. This opportunity led me to better understand our electoral process and the effectiveness of a strong grassroots campaign.

On campus, I am President of Boston College’s Model United Nations team, an organization with over 350 members that competes internationally against other colleges in debate-style conference. This past year, I also presented research on micro targeting that I conducted last summer during the congressional election, through the Advanced Study Grant program. This research showed me how micro targeting is a growing practice and how prevalent it has become in almost every political campaign, even the most local races.

This summer I will be interning for Congressman Carlos Curbelo’s district office in Miami, Florida. In this internship I will be conducting research on issues affecting the district and other policy matters that will impact the community. I will also be assisting with the planning of outreach programs and be given opportunities to lead event planning later in my internship. I will also be attending meetings with constituents throughout the district to assist them with issues they may be facing that our office can help them resolve. Finally, I will be given the opportunity to meet with other elected officials and their staff to coordinate with them in dealing with matters facing the community.

After graduation, I intend to work for a member of Congress for a few years and eventually attend law school. I am hopeful that these two experiences can lead me to a place where I will one day be able to affect policymaking.


 

Charlotte Davidsen

Charlotte Davidsen

Charlotte Davidsen, a Danish­-American dual citizen, is a rising senior at Boston College where she is majoring in International Studies with a concentration in International Ethics and Social Justice and minoring in Art History. At Boston College, she is a blogger and photographer for BC Streak, a local media startup that presents current events, opinion pieces, and Boston College activities in a daily email newsletter. She is also a member of Boston College’s Prison Arts Outreach program where she combines her interests in both art and social justice to help organize art outreach workshops and instigate healing processes for Massachusetts female prisoners. Her past experiences interning for Congressman Steny Hoyer on Capitol Hill, working for a Danish consultant firm in Copenhagen, and supporting small business development and microfinance in Sangolquí, Ecuador last summer, have led her to want to further develop an understanding for foreign cultures, affairs, and global development in a program that encourages innovation and initiative.

Charlotte was competitively selected to serve as an intern for the summer of 2015 for Save the Children, an international nonprofit that works towards a world in which every child attains the right to survival, protection, development, and participation, in Washington, D.C. As a leader on global action on children’s rights for more than 90 years, Save the Children is a nonprofit organization that invests in childhood, every day, in both times of crisis and for the future. Through projects pertaining to health, education, international policy, advocacy, and child protection worldwide, Save the Children is driven and committed to goals that echo the enduring Jesuit commitment of social justice. The New Business Development department, the specific team where Charlotte will be working, aims at providing quality control, strategic guidance, and support for the development of new, large­scale programs. New Business Development promotes the identification, selection, and response to priority initiatives in coordination with Save the Children’s country offices around the world and each of Save the Children’s technical teams. As an intern in the New Business Development Program, some of her proposed duties and responsibilities will be to provide assistance and analysis on specific research projects related to Save the Children’s funding priorities, knowledge management initiatives, grant proposal requests, and communication/technology needs.

After graduation, Charlotte hopes to continue her education in ethics and social justice and pursue a career in international development, law or global business by working for a global charity, international organization, or social business.


 

Grace Denny

Since high school, I have known that I wanted a career where I could help people and work on solving important problems. One of the reasons I applied to Boston College was the emphasis on serving others. There are many different ways to do this, and many potential careers where I could work on these issues, but through my classes at BC, particularly in political science, I’ve decided that the best way to address the issues that are important to me, like climate change, education, and gender equality, is through the government. This year, I worked for JumpStart, a program that works to improve literacy among underprivileged pre-school students, in an effort to eliminate the gap between them and their more affluent peers. While the program was an incredibly rewarding experience, it made me even more convinced that programs like these cannot solve the problem. Instead, the government needs to address the more systemic issues that create that type of gap in the first place.

The Attorney General’s Office combines the practice of law with public policy. I hope that through my internship with the Attorney General, I will have an opportunity to observe how the two work together and affect people’s lives. I’m working in the Department of Consumer Protection, which deals with fraud, unfair trade practices, and mediating consumer complaints. Along with assisting with mediating consumer complaints and helping in the office, I’ll have the opportunity to observe how the attorneys handle their cases and go to court with them sometimes. Throughout the course of my internship I’ll also be able to attend seminars with the attorneys who work in different departments and learn about other departments within the office.

Although I am unsure about whether or not I want to pursue a career as a lawyer, I know that I want to have a career in government and public service. Hopefully this internship will provide me with some valuable work experience for a future job in the government.


 

Michael Demakos

Michael Demakos

Michael Demakos is a senior born and raised in Fairfield, Connecticut. He graduated from Fairfield College Preparatory School in 2012, where he was involved in the Political Awareness Society, Campus Ministry, and varsity rugby. As a Jesuit Institution, Fairfield Prep profoundly impacted Michael’s political and social outlook, and his most formative experiences included two immersion trips to El Salvador and volunteer work close to home in Bridgeport, Connecticut. These experiences were invaluable in understanding the nature of poverty in all of its forms. At Boston College, Michael majors in Political Science and Classical Studies. He has been a member of the Men’s Rugby Club since the fall of his freshman year and currently serves as its Vice President, and he has maintained his strong connection with the country of El Salvador, having returned once again in in 2014. Most recently, Michael spent a semester studying at the American College of Thessaloniki in Thessaloniki, Greece.

This summer, Michael will be working in Governor Charlie Baker’s administration as an intern for the Governor’s Council. The Governor’s Council assists the governor by providing advice and consent in areas including warrants for the state treasury, pardons and commutations, and gubernatorial appointments for judges, public administrators, and various state boards. The eight-member body, also known as the Executive Council, is comprised of individuals elected from districts every two years, and meets publicly each week to discuss issues and record its advice. An intern’s work can include anything assisting in the day-to-day operation of the department, but more specifically it involves researching legislation and assisting council members regarding judicial nomination and appointments to state boards, as well as pardons and commutations.

After graduation, Michael would like to work in government at the state or national level and eventually pursue a Masters degree in public policy or administration. Ultimately, he hopes that he can pursue a career that combines his interests in government and politics, while always being mindful of the values instilled by his Jesuit education.


 

Kayla Fries

Kayla Fries

Kayla Fries is a rising junior from Rochester, New York. Prior to attending Boston College, Kayla was involved in varsity sports, piano, student government, and community service clubs. Kayla traveled to New Orleans to aid in community restoration after Hurricane Katrina, and additionally participated in a WWII program in Normandy, France, where she visited historical landmarks and the D-Day beaches.

At Boston College, Kayla studies psychology and business law, and plans to attend law school post-graduation, with the ultimate goal of becoming a litigation attorney. She participates on the Boston College Mock Trial team, and serves as a research assistant in the Morality Lab, where she studies moral objectivism versus relativism in children. Kayla enjoys running and working out in her free time, and competed in her first triathlon during her sophomore year. Last summer, Kayla spent time in Lima, Peru, where she worked in a children’s home, providing psychological and emotional support for impoverished, neglected children. Kayla is excited to spend the upcoming semester in Paris, France, where she will be studying at the American University of Paris.

This summer, Kayla will be interning at both Volunteer Legal Services Project and the NYS Office of the Attorney General. Volunteer Legal Services Project (VLSP) provides legal services for low-income residents of Rochester, New York, who are in need of legal guidance for non-criminal cases but unable to afford a lawyer. At VLSP, she will be dividing her time between family law and consumer law departments. The family law department provides legal services to clients seeking custody, child or spousal support, divorce, or clients involved in domestic violence cases. The consumer department at VLSP deals heavily with unemployment benefit cases, debt, and bankruptcy. Along with assisting in this department, Kayla will be conducting an independent project through the Debt Clinic at VLSP, which provides informational services to individuals filing Chapter 7 and Chapter 13 bankruptcy. In addition to assisting in these clinics, Kayla will have the opportunity to attend trials in order to gain exposure to court procedures.

At the Office of the Attorney General (OAG), Kayla will be working in the Consumer Frauds and Protection Bureau, which is responsible for the mediation or litigation of businesses and individuals involved in fraudulent, misleading, deceptive, or other illegal actions. As an intern, she will be trained to work directly with consumers to resolve disputes through the voluntary mediation program within the Consumer Fraud Department. Kayla will be responsible for answering inquiries from the public, contacting businesses to encourage negotiation with the opposing party, and directing potential clients to the correct field of expertise in regard to their legal issues. She will also be responsible for reviewing complaints and creating corresponding summaries. Additionally, as with VLSP, Kayla will have to opportunity to observe court proceedings through the OAG. The combination of both experiences will provide a valuable variety of learning opportunities and exposure to different fields of law.

While Kayla’s interest in law has motivated her extracurricular activities on campus, her summer internship positions will provide valuable exposure to complement her experiences at Boston College thus far. Both opportunities this summer will allow her to develop practical knowledge of, and experience in, the field of law, while simultaneously dedicating her services to assist others with their legal conflicts.


 

Caroline Karalias

Caroline Karalias

My name is Caroline Karalias and I’m a rising senior majoring in Psychology and English. I am originally from Merrimac, Massachusetts where I attended Pentucket High School. Upon acceptance to BC, I was one of fifty freshmen accepted to the Emerging Leaders Program.  I also started the campus organization Minutes for Memories, a BC chapter of a local non-profit dedicated to granting wishes to those who have suffered life-changing traumatic injuries and I am currently the president of the organization.

Along with this, I have been involved with the Appalachia Volunteers, Students for Education Reform and now the Clough Center Fellowship. I am also a Forest Foundation Fellow. Last summer, I was accepted into the Forest Foundation Program which gave grants to undergraduates pursuing a career in non-profit work.  I was placed at a non-profit in Lynn, La Vida, which focused on closing the opportunity gap for high-achieving, low-income highschoolers by helping them prepare and apply to some of the top colleges in the country. There, I helped create a community service program which was integrated into the La Vida curriculum, getting students involved in their neighborhood.

This summer, I will be an intern for Year Up, a non-profit in Boston whose mission is to “...provide low-income young adults, ages 18-24, with a combination of hands-on skill development, college credits, corporate internships, and support.” These students go through rigorous job skills training for six months and are then placed in an internship with one of the non-profit’s corporate partners for another six months. My internship will be with the applications department assisting mainly with those applicants who have already been accepted. I will help them with the technicalities of the applications process as well as be a part of on-boarding interviews to determine how to best aid the student. It will also be my responsibility to observe the entire applications process and make suggestions as to how to streamline certain aspects.

In the future, I hope to continue my involvement in the non-profit world while working toward a Masters in Social Work. I would love to have a career with an organization such as Year Up. One day I hope to gain my licensure and become an LICSW while pursuing the possibility of starting my own non-profit organization.


Kosta Karamanakis

Kosta Karamanakis

Kosta Karamanakis is a junior in the College of Arts and Sciences studying Political Science and History. This summer, he will be working in Washington, D.C. as an editorial intern at GOVERNING Magazine – a nonpartisan media platform covering the politics and management of state and local governments. His responsibilities will include conducting research, fact-checking, and writing articles. In addition to reporting on the innovative ways states and localities have addressed problems in their communities, Kosta’s research will focus on how state and local leaders work with federal agencies so as to best serve their constituents.

Kosta’s lifelong fascination with politics stems from his family’s emphasis on public service and civic duty. A native of Dudley, Massachusetts, Kosta is a graduate of Shepherd Hill Regional High School and the first in his family to attend a four-year university. His interests include reading, writing, watching movies, drinking tea, and spending time with his family and friends. An avid traveler, Kosta will spend his junior year abroad studying U.S.-U.K. relations and twentieth century history at Oxford University.

During his two years at Boston College, Kosta has cultivated a fascination with America’s history and political traditions. He has been recognized as a Distinguished Sophomore Scholar by the Political Science Department and a Dean’s Sophomore Scholar by the College of Arts and Sciences. Additionally, he was awarded an Advanced Study Grant to pursue independent research in Istanbul regarding Turkey’s treatment of the Ecumenical Patriarch of Constantinople. Kosta is also a Resident Assistant, a member of the Student Conduct Board, and a tutor at the Volunteer and Service Learning Center for BC employees learning English as a second language.

Off campus, Kosta has interned at the Office of the Governor and the Consulate General of Greece in Boston, where he worked as a speechwriter. An active proponent of youth-led education reform and community development, he has worked closely with the Department of Education, the Department of Health and Human Services, the United Teen Equality Center, and the United Way. Most recently, Kosta served as an appointee of Governor Deval L. Patrick on the Massachusetts Afterschool and Out-of-School Time Coordinating Council (2013-2015) and the Governor’s Statewide Youth Council (2012-2014). His efforts have focused on civic engagement, the educational achievement gap, and raising awareness of homelessness among LGBTQ youth.

Kosta plans to attend law school following his graduation from Boston College in 2017. He hopes to one day hold public office and wants to make a difference in the lives of others through public service. He is grateful for the opportunities afforded to him by the Clough Center for the Study of Constitutional Democracy and looks forward to a formative year as a Junior Fellow.


 

Tate Krasner

Tate Krasner

Tate Krasner is a senior from Charlotte, NC. He is an International Studies major with a concentration in Ethics and minors in Chinese and Russian. At Boston College, Tate serves as an Undergraduate Research Fellow for Kenneth Himes and Jennifer Erickson. He is also Editor-in-Chief of Al-Noor, Boston College’s Middle Eastern and Islamic Studies Journal, and is a member of the Presidential Scholars Program. Tate spent last summer at the S. Rajaratnam School of International Studies, a graduate school and policy think tank of Nanyang Technological University in Singapore, where he conducted research on Chinese unmanned aerial vehicles.

This summer, Tate will be working with the Hekima Institute for Peace Studies and International Relations in Nairobi, Kenya. There, he will perform research in the fields of regional organizations, peacebuilding, and conflict resolution. In addition to working at the institute, he will be meeting will local nongovernmental organizations that deal with peace and security issues, observing how they operate within a large, complex framework of international and regional organizations. HIPSIR is a graduate school of Hekima College, a Jesuit university in Nairobi. Its primary focuses are conflict analysis, transitional justice, peacebuilding, conflict resolution, and reconciliation. In addition to work in policy research, conflict monitoring, advocacy, and publication, Hekima serves as the hub of a network of regional NGOs, providing a forum for discourse and engagement in Kenya and beyond.

In the future, Tate plans to pursue a career in international policy, with a focus on security issues, peacekeeping, and conflict resolution. He seeks to gain admittance to a graduate program for public or foreign policy, with the eventual hopes of working for an international or nongovernmental organization.


 

Jordan Kreke

Jordan Kreke

I am a senior majoring in political science and economics. Before relocating to Boston I grew up in Miami, FL, graduating from Coral Reef Senior High School in 2012. I come from a culturally diverse background, with a mother of Cuban descent and father from the Virgin Islands. Growing up in Miami provided me with unique socioeconomic and cultural exposure that catalyzed my interest in public policy. During my time as a student at BC I have worked as an undergraduate research fellow in the political science department, interned at Miami based financial firm Fairholme Capital Management, and ran the 2014 Boston Marathon. In addition, I spent the spring semester of my junior year studying in Barcelona, Spain.

This summer I will be working in our nation’s capital at the Cato Institute. Within Cato, I will be working as a research intern in the Center for Global Liberty and Prosperity. This center was established to promote a better understanding around the world of the benefits market-liberal policy solutions to encourage economic freedom and end world poverty. The Center addresses a number of issues regarding political economy such as, economic growth, international financial crises, informal economy, policy reform, the effectiveness of foreign aid, transition from socialism to the market, and globalization. In addition, every year the Center works with more than 70 think tanks around the world to produce the Economic Freedom of the World report. In connection with these issues, this summer I will primarily be conducting economic and public policy research, as well as attending weekly seminars on politics, economics, philosophy, law, and the essence of democratic liberty.

After graduating, I plan on attaining graduate degrees in economics and public policy. With this I hope to pursue a career in foreign affairs, potentially with the United Nations or U.S. Department of State. I have also considered working in the private sector, primarily in economic or political consulting.


 

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Marissa Marandola

A native of Cranston, RI, Marissa Marandola is a senior at Boston College majoring in Political Science with minors in American Studies and Management and Leadership. She is a member of the Gabelli Presidential Scholars Program, the Morrissey College of Arts and Sciences Honors Program, and the Political Science Departmental Honors Program, and was recently inducted into Phi Beta Kappa and Alpha Sigma Nu, the Jesuit Honor Society. Marissa’s scholarly work has been featured in Elements and The USC Journal of Law and Society. On campus, she serves as the Editor-in-Chief of Elements, BC’s undergraduate research journal, and as an executive board member for BC Splash, and was recently appointed as Undergraduate Co-Coordinator of the Clough Junior Fellows Program for the 2015-2016 academic year. Marissa also works as an Undergraduate Research Fellow for Professor David Hopkins in the Political Science Department and as a peer tutor in the Connors Family Learning Center. She has previously interned with the Juvenile Justice Department of RI Family Court, the RI Department of Attorney General, and the RI Center for Freedom and Prosperity. In April, Marissa was named a recipient of the prestigious 2015 Harry S. Truman Scholarship, an honor that acknowledges students’ commitment to public service and potential for leadership.

Marissa will be working in the capital city of her home state, Providence, Rhode Island, in the policy division of the Office of Governor Gina M. Raimondo, serving as an intern for Deputy Chief of Staff Kevin Gallagher. As Deputy Chief Gallagher’s portfolio includes education, from early childhood through postgraduate work, transportation, revenue, commerce, elderly affairs, healthcare, and veterans’ affairs, among other areas, her projects for the summer will align with his agenda, as determined by the Governor’s priorities. Marissa will report directly to Mr. Gallagher while completing her duties, which will involve detailed review of current regulations and statutes, communication with representatives of state departments, data collection, synthesis, and analysis, and extensive academic and professional writing. Her assignments will emphasize her areas of particular interest, namely, the intersection of law and politics (through some collaboration with the Governor’s Office of General Counsel) and education policy (through projects concerning K-12 or higher education). Following her graduation from Boston College, Marissa plans to pursue a law degree and an eventual career in the field of education law and politics.


 

Kaitlin O’Donnell

Kaitlin O’Donnell

My name is Kaitlin O’Donnell and I am a rising senior from Portland, Oregon in the Morrissey College of Arts and Sciences. I am an International Studies major with a focus in Ethics and Social Justice and a Hispanic Studies minor. At BC, I am an Orientation Leader, co-founder of the Women’s Club Basketball Team, an Academic Advising Fellow, and a member of the Student Admissions Program where I give tours and panels for prospective students. Last fall, I spent the semester studying abroad in Bilbao, Spain.

This summer I will be interning at the U.S. Fund for UNICEF in Boston. The U.S. Fund for UNICEF supports UNICEF’s work around the world through fundraising, advocacy, and education in the United States. At this internship, I will be working on development and fundraising for the organization. I will responsible for assisting in fundraising, research, and marketing. I will be in contact with various donors to the organization to inform them about UNICEF’s current projects and speak with them about donating to the cause. I will be helping create reports about emergency situations in certain countries and what UNICEF is doing/has done to help with such issues. I will help plan ideas for fundraising events and work on initiatives that might bring in more money to fund UNICEF’s many programs and provide humanitarian aid.

In the future, I hope to work at the UN in some capacity in New York. I would love to have the opportunity to travel around the world helping countries better the government in order to help people who may be suffering. I have a particular interest in working with conflict resolution and indigenous rights issues, and would love to work in Central/South America. My dream would be to work as the U.S. Ambassador to the UN. However, if things go differently, I could also see myself working for an international NGO that helps with humanitarian relief and peacekeeping in various countries. I hope to go to grad school at Columbia for International Affairs in the future in order to help accomplish my future career goals.


 

Anna Olcott

Anna Olcott

Anna Olcott is a rising junior at Boston College and is an English and Political Science major with a minor in Hispanic Studies. She is from a small town in Bergen County, New Jersey and is the youngest of three children. Living in a suburb of New York City, she has witnessed both the splendor and inequality in New York. At BC, she has participated in the editorial council of The Laughing Medusa, an all-women’s literature and arts journal on campus, interned at Post Road magazine, and volunteer tutored through the Boston College Neighborhood Center. Her education at Boston College has opened her eyes to the need for social justice not only around the world, but in local communities as well to repair inequalities that persist. Combining her passions for helping others and New York, she will be interning at LIFT-NYC this summer.

LIFT is a non-profit organization seeking to help end the cycle of poverty across the United States. Anna will be working at their office in the South Bronx. This organization is committed to lifting poverty-stricken people in cities out of poverty for good, by working with them one-on-one to find employment, housing, and other essentials to develop economic independence.  LIFT is based on the idea that all people need personal, financial, and social foundations in order to avoid poverty, but that not everyone has access to these foundations. LIFT seeks to provide encouragement and networks to help people gain these foundations and eventually to become financially stable. By inspiring confidence in clients to manage through tough times, creating networks of families and advocates, and providing the resources to find jobs and housing, LIFT has helped over 10,000 people overcome poverty.

Anna’s role at LIFT will be an “advocate,” which requires her to work one-on-one with clients to help them achieve their goals. She will serve as a support system and resource to assist clients in their journey out of poverty. She will also participate in further learning sessions to connect her experiences at LIFT with the issues of poverty and financial inequality across the country. She hopes to continue pursuing this line of work in the future in whatever capacity she can.


 

Jordan Pino

Jordan Pino

Jordan Alexander Pino is a junior in the Morrissey College of Arts and Sciences at Boston College.  He is pursuing the PPE course of study, an interdisciplinary program of intensive research and writing in philosophy, politics, and economics.  Originally, Jordan is from Winter Park, Florida, where he graduated from Lake Highland Preparatory School in 2013.  In high school, Jordan participated in Congressional Debate locally and nationally, and he led his school newspaper as Editor-in-Chief.  Additionally, Jordan helped to reduce youth criminal recidivism as a volunteer attorney in the Orange County Juvenile Court’s “Teen Court” diversionary program.  At BC, Jordan has served as a Resident Assistant in Fenwick Hall, and he has worked as a Research Assistant at the Center on Wealth and Philanthropy.  In addition, Jordan has been involved in the Clough Center’s Junior Fellows program, and he has helped to resolve the cases of students as a member of the Student Conduct Board.

In past summers, Jordan has studied in Madrid, worked in the Orlando office of U.S. Senator Marco Rubio, and written for his hometown newspaper, the Orlando Sentinel.

This summer, Jordan will be working at the American Enterprise Institute for Public Policy Research (AEI) in Washington, D.C., serving as a Research Intern on the Poverty Studies team.  AEI’s Poverty Studies explores a number of government services, such as cash welfare, Medicaid, and reeducation and employment programs.  It seeks to study the root causes of poverty as well as methods of alleviation with the intention of developing policies that assist low-income Americans’ work and welfare.  In this vein, Jordan will assist by contributing to short- and long-term research studies, arranging the publication of completed scholarly works, and organizing conferences and seminars related to poverty studies.  Jordan is looking forward to this opportunity to refine his research and analysis skills, as he works towards a hopeful but eventual thesis on this very topic — effective anti-poverty programs — and their interaction with principles of American federalism.  

In the near future, Jordan will be taking his interests in PPE to Durham University in the United Kingdom to study abroad, where he hopes to continue to develop his research interests in normative ethics, federalism, and anti-poverty programs as well as where he hopes to resume participation in debate.  After graduating from BC, Jordan intends on pursuing law school.  While he plans on a long legal career, Jordan does foresee an eventual calling to state politics, perhaps leading to the Congress one day.


Samantha Pinsak

Samantha Pinsak

Samantha Pinsak is a rising senior from Camarillo, a small town in beautiful Southern California. As an Economics and History major, her main academic interests lie in economic development and women’s empowerment issues. She spent the past semester abroad in Geneva, Switzerland, and continues to work as an intern for CUTS International, a non-governmental organization that works to promote the pro-trade, pro-equity voice of the “Global South” at the World Trade Organization, particularly within the East African Region. On campus, Samantha is a Student Health Coach, specializing in iStrive, through the Office of Health Promotion and a Bystander Trainer through the Women’s Center. Last summer, Samantha participated in an archaeological excavation in Northern Belize of ancient Maya ruins, and also interned at the Ronald Reagan Presidential Library in the audiovisual archives.

For the summer of 2015, Samantha will be in Nairobi, Kenya working and conducting research at the Hekima Institute of Peace Studies and International Relations (HIPSIR). In addition to its role as a graduate institute, HIPSIR acts as an informational hub for non-governmental organizations in the East African region, providing a network for information sharing and dialogue on various issues related to conflict resolution, peacebuilding, and reconciliation. Samantha will be particularly focusing on the issue of violence against women and how its occurrence influences female economic participation levels in post-conflict communities. She hopes to interview and shadow various NGOs that focus on women’s empowerment and economic employment projects in Nairobi and the surrounding areas in order to gather an understanding of the prevalent issues and patterns surrounding the topic.

After graduating, Samantha hopes to continue her work in international development and women’s issues, either through NGOs or with an international development consulting firm. She is also considering the idea of returning to academia to pursue a Master’s in Social Work, focused on global women’s issues. 


 

Luke Urbanczyk

Luke Urbanczyk

My name is Luke Urbanczyk. I am from Rye, New York and went to Rye High School. While there, I played on the varsity hockey team for four years, and also ran track. I have been interested in civics and the social sciences as long as I can remember. History, Government, Economics, and other social sciences were always my favorite subjects in school. These broad and often interdisciplinary interests have persisted during my time at BC. I am a rising junior in the Morrissey College of Arts & Sciences majoring in Political Science and minoring in International Studies - International Political Economy concentration. I was named a "Distinguished Sophomore" of the Political Science department, I am on the executive board of the Eagle Political Society, and I am a member of the men's club ultimate frisbee team.

This summer I will be a research & development intern at the World Policy Institute in New York City. WPI is a non-partisan think tank that focuses on emerging global issues and seeks to promote compelling new global perspectives and policy solutions.WPI attempts to tackle issues such as, climate change, democracy, migration, technology, economic development, human rights, and counter-terrorism. WPI also publishes the World Policy Journal, a monthly journal that challenges conventional wisdom on global affairs, offering strong points of view that transcend the foreign-versus-domestic policy divide, reflecting the Institute's ‘world’ perspective. As a research & development intern, I will gain experience in policy research and advocacy on these global issues by assisting the Institute’s senior fellows and staff. I will also be responsible for event planning, liaising with partner institutions, donor solicitation, and more.

Moving forward, I hope to purse my academic and career-related passions in any way possible. Recently, I have been considering a future in Law. However, if I do decide to go to law school after graduation, I would like to build on my experience at WPI and work for a year or two before going to law school. Ideally that would be something related to government, economics, or public policy at a think tank, an embassy, a political consulting firm, paralegal work, or in government.


 

Elizabeth Valentine

Elizabeth Valentine

My name is Elizabeth Valentine and though I am originally from the Tampa Bay Area in Florida, I will be entering my senior year at Boston College in the fall. I am majoring in political science in the pre-law program. In addition to going to school fulltime I also served as Program Coordinator for the mock trial program, sound designed several plays and work at the law library.  I will be spending this summer interning at the Massachusetts Office on Disability. I will be largely assisting with research and data compilation in order to ensure that disability regulations are being upheld throughout the state and that the appropriate action can be taken where they aren’t. In addition to this, however, I am also helping direct people who contact the office seeking advice to the person best suited to help them and assisting with other projects going on around the office as need be. I am also lucky enough to have the opportunity to attend many of the meetings that the director and other members of the office go to, which allows me to gain valuable insight and experience, along with working with the office attorney to learn more about the legal processes involved in disability legislation and regulation. This is especially valuable to me as I hope to attend law school when I am finished with college and go on to work for the state, either as a prosecutor or juvenile defender. After working in that job for at least ten years, I would like to get into politics and hopefully advance my career in that arena as far as it will go. The reason why I have chosen this particular career path is the same reason I have chosen this internship: I want to provide a voice for those who don’t have one, or have trouble making their voices heard. That is ultimately the goal that informs and inspires both my education and career plans.


 

Keara Walsh

Keara Walsh

Keara Walsh is a junior from Mountain Lakes, New Jersey. She graduated Cum Laude from Oak Knoll School of the Holy Child, where she participated in mock trial, the tennis team, and campus ministry. Her junior and senior year she helped organize and attended mission trips to a school in the Batey region of the Dominican Republic. At Boston College, Keara is the International Project Director for Nourish International and serves as an Eucharistic minister. She majors in International Studies with a concentration in Economics, and has a minor in Hispanic Studies.

This summer, Keara will travel to Cochabamba, Bolivia where she will work with CECAM Bolivia in partnership with Sustainable Bolivia, two non-profit organizations that aim to promote sustainability and growth in the area. This internship is through Nourish International, a non-profit based on college campuses across the country to engage students and empower communities to make a lasting impact on extreme poverty. While in Bolivia, Keara will work with CECAM Bolivia on the Pedal Project, which aims to promote the benefits of bicycle based technology, including the accessibility and ecologically friendly components. The CECAM team will work in various schools to help teach children the value and possibility of being financially independent and managing a small business.

After graduation, Keara plans to continue her work with non-profit organizations, in addition to possibly pursuing a degree in law. She hopes to continue traveling, especially throughout Central and South America, to work hands-on with communities in order to implement long term change and improvements.


 

Joon Yoo

Joon Yoo

Joon Yoo, originally from Federal Way, Washington, is a junior in the Carroll School of Management’s Honors Program with a concentration in Finance and Computer Science. Raised by Korean immigrants, Joon is number four out of five kids- Jeannie, Jason, Joy, Joon, and Jamie. Affectionately, they refer to each other as JY1, JY2, JY3, JY4, and JY5.

Since Joon arrived at Boston College in Fall 2013, she has been actively involved in groups she is passionate about. After her first semester, she started working at the Boston College bakery, working from the first, 7AM Newton bus to her first afternoon class, where she has continued to work up to the present. She also serves as the chapter co-founder and co-president of Moneythink, a national non-profit start-up aimed at curbing financial illiteracy in urban youth through financial education mentorship from local college students. For her sophomore year, she was the co-vice chair of the Honors Program Speaker Series Committee, which invited esteemed businesspersons to share their life and career stories to inform and inspire students, and will continue her involvement as co-chair in her junior year. Five days a week of her sophomore spring semester was enjoyed interning at a Boston-based start-up called Quantopian, a free, online algorithmic trading platform and crowd-sourced hedge fund. Upon returning from her fall abroad in Vienna, she will further develop her role in the bakery, in Moneythink, and in the Speaker Series.

This summer, thanks to the Clough Center and Career Center, she will be interning at South Pacific Business Development Microfinance Fund (SPBD) Tonga, utilizing her finance and computer science skills acquired during her time at Boston College. SPBD is a network of microfinance institutions working in Fiji, Samoa, Tonga, and Solomon Islands dedicated to eradicating poverty by empowering women in poor rural villages with the opportunity to start, grow and maintain sustainable, income-generating micro-enterprises. In addition to learning about the microfinance operation system, she will create a mobile data collection tool using the Open Data Kit (ODK) to optimize data capture operations. The ODK is a free and open-source set of tools that helps organizations create mobile data collection solutions with smartphones and cloud infrastructure. Her project with the ODK will help SPBD increase its impact in the modern, mobile age. She looks forward to sharing her experience with others who are interested in social service, especially those who are business-minded and are looking for unique opportunities beyond the traditional finance sphere.

While Joon does not quite know what she wants to do, she knows that it will involve some of her many interests, including start-ups, education, social work, investments, arts, and culinary. Wherever she ends up, she hopes to work with exciting people in interesting places.


 

Hallie Young

Hallie Young

Hallie Young is a senior at Boston College majoring in Communication and minoring in International Studies with a concentration in Ethics and International Social Justice. She was born and raised in Washington, DC where she grew up learning Spanish at a bilingual school. She has also spent time living and studying in California, Uruguay and South Africa. When she is not in class, she spends her time volunteering as a tutor to Angelis at her 4Boston placement and working with BC Catering. She also enjoys traveling and baking.

Hallie will be spending the summer as an intern at the non-profit organization, Hearts of Gold, based in Cuenca, Ecuador. The organization serves as an umbrella organization for various local groups that work to create sustainable development within the Azuay province of Ecuador. Hearts of Gold connects local humanitarian efforts with global networks in order to improve the living conditions and basic human rights of the Ecuadorian people. Hallie will be working alongside the directors of the organization as a Communication intern. She will be assisting with the organization’s communication plan through social media outreach, management of correspondence with donors, aiding event planning and a variety of other administrative tasks. The internship will give her an opportunity to gain firsthand experience in the operation of an NGO.

In the future, Hallie hopes to continue her work with non-governmental organizations as she plans to pursue a career in community outreach and international development. Due to her prior Spanish education, she hopes to work particularly with Hispanic communities. Her experience with Hearts of Gold will allow her to gain in depth knowledge about some of the communities she hopes to work with in the future and will allow her to begin to collaborate with those communities in finding solutions for local and global issues.