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Boisi Center for Religion and American Public Life

The Future of Liberal Education

 

Further Reading by W. Robert Connor

"The Future of the American University," The Modern University: Its Present Status and Future Prospects (Papers from the Sixth Kenan Convocation, April 22-24, 1993).

"Moral Knowledge in the Modern University," Ideas, Vol.6, No.1 (1999): 56-67.

"Why We Need Independent Centers for Advanced Study," The Chronicle Review (January 17, 2003).

"Where Have All the Big Questions Gone?," Inside Higher Ed (December 12, 2005).

"From Foxes to Hedgehogs," Inside Higher Ed (March 31, 2006).

"The Right Time and Place for Big Questions," The Chronicle Review (June 9, 2006).   

"Last Bastion of Liberal Education?," Inside Higher Ed, (July 24, 2006).

"What's Happened to the Major in Liberal Education?," Liberal Education, Vol.95, No.2, (Spring, 2009).

"Talking the Talk, Then Walking the Walk," Inside Higher Ed, (September 25, 2009).

"When Hope and History Rhyme: Good Work in Hard Times," The Teagle Foundation Annual Report, (2009).


Further Reading

"A Liberal Education: Should academics join the government?" by Martha C. Nussbaum,The New Republic, March 11, 2011.

 

In The News

"Workforce needs a liberal arts education, not skills training, says professor," by Vishal Persaud, The Jersey Journal, February 21, 2011.

This article discusses the lecture of Stanley Aronowitz, author and professor of sociology and urban education at the City University of New York's graduate center, who argues that, "in order to foster creative, innovative-minded workers, institutions of higher learning need to enforce four pillars of education - literature, history, philosophy and biology." 

"Lowering Higher Education," interview with James E. Cote and Anton L. Allahar by Scott Jaschik, Inside Higher Ed, February 23, 2011.

In this interview, Cote and Allahar discuss their new book, Lowering Higher Education: The Rise of Corporate Universities and the Fall of Liberal Education, which urges colleges to asses "whether these trends result in the sacrifice of important academic values."