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Boisi Center for Religion and American Public Life

Building: Houses, Community, Resumes?

Dan Couch, A&S '09
Matt Raffol, CSOM '09
Prof. Jennie Purnell, Political Science
Prof. Robert Murphy, Economics
Date: Thursday, March 19, 2009
Time: 7:00-9:30 PM
Location: McGuinn 121

photo of a construction site

What are the pros and cons of service work -- both abroad and on a local level? Does BC's Jesuit commitment affect the way its students view and do service?

This panel, hosted by the student advisory panel of the Boisi Center for Religion and American Public Life, is intended to provide both positive and critical reflection on service opportunities. We hope it will examine the motivations behind such activities, as well as the benefits and difficulties created for both participants and recipients of the service work, and how Catholic social teaching informs the work being done.

Dan Couch, A&S '09

Dan Couch grew up in Missouri and California, graduating from Bellarmine College Preparatory in San Jose, CA in 2005. He is a senior at Boston College, majoring in English and minoring in Philosophy.  Dan is currently serving on the 4Boston Council for the Suffolk County House of Corrections and has just led an Appalachia trip to Lebanon, PA.

Matt Raffol, CSOM '09

Matt is a double major in Psychology and Management, concentrating in Economics.  Through Boston College he has been exposed to service and immersion through the Pedro Arrupe Program on trips to Belize and Nogales, Mexico; the Lynch School’s Natchez Immersion Trip to Natchez, Mississippi; an Economic Development class trip to El Salvador; the Campus School Volunteers of BC; and 4Boston.  After graduating, he will be volunteering as part of a faith-based volunteer program in Chicago at Mercy Home for Boys & Girls—a home for abused, neglected and abandoned children.

Prof. Jennie Purnell, Political Science

Jennie Purnell is the founding director of the Boston College Center for Student Formation and an associate professor in the Department of Political Science.  Her current research interests focus on faith-based social activism and transnational social movements.

Prof. Robert Murphy, Economics

Robert Murphy has been an associate professor in the Department of Economics since 1984. His areas of speciality include macroeconomics and international economics. He will reflect on the issue of whether foreign aid given by governments is effective in generating economic development in poor countries.

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