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Oct. 5, 2006 • Volume 15 Number 3

CNBC "Mad Money" host Jim Cramer makes his way through the audience during a taping of his popular show on Sept. 20 in Conte Forum. The program aired later that night. (Photo by Justin Knight)

Around Campus

Neighbors all

Fall is a time for new beginnings, especially when it comes to college, so with that in mind some Boston College students sought to start off the academic year on a positive note with their off-campus neighbors.

On Sept. 21, BC held a "Come Meet Your Neighbor Night" in the Kirkwood and Radnor roads area of Brighton. Some 200-250 people - including students and residents as well as BC administrators - attended the event, which featured a Texas-style barbecue and a DJ.

"It was a great turn-out, and just a really terrific evening overall," said Director of Community Affairs William Mills. "Some of the neighbors in attendance were people who have had concerns about BC in the past, and they seemed to feel the event was quite successful. There was a lot of mingling going on - it wasn't just everyone off in their own groups."

The event was organized as part of the Campus Community Partnership Initiative, a program designed to strengthen the working relationship between local universities and their host communities.

Helping to break the ice were activities such as a scavenger hunt which required participants to find out certain information about each other, Mills noted. "Everything from 'someone who was born the same month as you' to 'someone who speaks more than one language' to 'someone with the most unusual pet.'"

There also was a trick question, Mills adds: "'Find someone who has been or is an elected official.' Nobody fit that description."

-SS

Sweet talking

Who says talking with a faculty member or academic advisor has to be a staid, stilted affair? Certainly not the University's Academic Advising Center, which today is kicking off "Professors and Pastries," a series of informal gatherings with representatives - BC and non-BC - from academic or professional fields that will feature casual conversation and, yes, pastries.

Each event in the series, which the center is co-organizing with academic departments and other advising resources, will be geared around a broad theme, such as today's "Life Sciences and the Health Professions" chat from 3:30-5:30 p.m. in Gasson 100. Others will include "Living Ethically and Contributing Socially," "Studying, Working and Living Abroad" and "The Study of Humanities and Preparing for the Law."

"These events are not intended exclusively for first-year students," says Academic Advising Center Associate Director Rory Browne, "but we do want to reach them as a group which would particularly benefit from continuing opportunities to become better acquainted with the resources, particularly of people, here at BC. The conversations should be helpful to any students who are trying to decide on their future classes, majors, minors, potential career paths and volunteer activities."

Browne says the invitation also is open to other faculty and BC colleagues interested in the subject matter of a specific "Professors and Pastries" event.

As for the aforementioned delicacies? "The Italian pastries are truly delicious and their consumption highly conducive to student-faculty conversation," affirms Browne, who notes that at the insistence of Academic Advising Center Director Elizabeth Nathans, "we've added chocolate-dipped strawberries to the menu."

For more on "Professors and Pastries," go to the Academic Advising Center Web page at www.bc.edu/offices/acadvctr/.

-SS

Stepping up, and forward

BC and four other area universities pledged $10 million in funds and services to help 10 of the city's underperforming public schools improve test scores and increase the number of students going to college.

Through a five-year plan titled "Step Up," BC, Boston University, Harvard, Northeastern and Tufts will provide teacher training, lend teaching assistance such as tutoring, and may advise schools on their curriculum design. They also will help with student issues, including dental and general-health screenings.

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