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Nov. 17, 2005 • Volume 14 Number 6

Study Lauds CSOM for Social, Environmental Focus

The Carroll School of Management ranked 15th in a recent international survey of top 30 MBA programs based on their efforts to prepare graduates on social and environmental stewardship in business.

In addition, Prof. Sandra Waddock of the school's Operations and Strategic Management Department was named in the report as one of six "Faculty Pioneers" who have taken a leadership role in incorporating social and environmental issues into their teaching and research.

The biennial publication, "Beyond Grey Pinstripes," was released last month by World Resources Institute and the Aspen Institute. To gather data for the study, nearly 600 MBA programs were invited to report on their coursework and research; in addition, 1,842 courses and 828 journal articles from leading peer-reviewed business publications were analyzed.

Stanford University's MBA program was ranked first, followed by the ESADE Business School of Spain and the York University Schulich School of Business in Canada. Other MBA programs finishing in the top 30 included those of Notre Dame (5), North Carolina (8), Wake Forest (10), Virginia (13), Yale (21), Wisconsin-Madison (28) and Georgetown (30). Three of the top five schools, and 12 of the top 30, are located outside the United States.

CSOM achieved its ranking by offering a substantial number of courses that addressed social and environmental issues in business, and by virtue of the relatively large proportion of students who took those classes.

"Beyond Grey Pinstripes" cited Waddock - a senior research fellow at the BC Center for Corporate Citizenship - as a pioneer in the field of social investing and corporate citizenship, and lauded her work as having had "a lasting impact on management scholarship, practice and education."

"She also plays an important role in helping individuals and firms invest with social and environmental impacts in mind," the report said, noting Waddock's role in the publication of the 100 Best Corporate Citizens rankings of corporate social responsibility. "She contributes to the rigor of the social investment community by tracking and critiquing the actions of mutual funds and money managers involved in values-based investing."

Waddock and the other five Faculty Pioneers were nominated by their peers and selected by a panel of corporate judges.

The "Beyond Grey Pinstripes" report can be viewed on-line at www.beyondgreypinstripes.org.

-Sean Smith

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