masthead

HomeAboutCalendarPeopleForumArchive

Sept. 10, 2004 • Volume 13 Number 1

BC Agrees to Purchase St. Stephen's Priory in Dover

Boston College this summer reached an agreement in principle with the Dominican Fathers Province of St. Joseph to purchase the St. Stephen's Priory in Dover, land that the University would use as a retreat and conference center.

St. Stephen's Priory is a 78.5-acre property situated on the Charles River and includes buildings totaling 68,792 square feet, comprised of the Priory, Siena House and auxiliary buildings. Acquired by the Dominican Fathers in 1951, the Priory will continue to operate as a religious retreat facility until it closes this month.

"Although there is a certain sense of sadness in leaving St. Stephen's, the Province is delighted that its sacred mission and identity will be maintained and continued through Boston College," said Fr. Dominic Izzo, provincial of the Dominican Fathers Province of St. Joseph.

University President William P. Leahy, SJ, said, "St. Stephen's Priory has been a place of prayer and spiritual renewal for decades and it will be a much-welcomed retreat and conference center for our students, faculty, staff and alumni. I am grateful that Fr. Izzo and the Dominicans have chosen to sell this property to Boston College."

The St. Stephen's agreement, announced in July, came shortly after BC's acquisition of 43 acres and five buildings from the Archdiocese of Boston was officially completed. BC will now prepare a new master plan to integrate the Brighton property with the Main Campus. Once it completes its study of the property, the University will work with the City of Boston and the Allston-Brighton Boston College Task Force to develop the master plan.

"This will be a very thorough process," said Associate Vice President for Governmental and Community Affairs Thomas Keady last week. "We place great importance on our working relationship with neighbors and local officials, and there will be every opportunity for them to offer their views on the potential impact of the Archdiocese land purchase."

top of page