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May 27, 2005 • Volume 13 Number 18

Asst. Prof. Paula Mathieu (English) reads stories written by Symphony (left) and Jah-Quiah for Kids 2 Cents, a collection of writing by area homeless children. Since 2002, Mathieu and students from her Literature of the Homeless class have tutored children at Sandraís Lodge, a Waltham shelter for homeless families, and helped them publish Kids 2 Cents in cooperation with Spare Change, the newspaper published by the Homeless Empowerment Project in Cambridge. (Photo by Justin Knight)

Around Campus

Getting his kicks

Guy Melamad only just received his Boston College diploma, but already he's got a special homecoming event in the Boston area on tap this weekend.

Melamad is scheduled to suit up tomorrow for the Colorado Rapids, a Major League Soccer team, for their game with the New England Revolution at Gillette Stadium. The Israeli native - who completed his bachelor's degree at the Carroll School of Management in three and a half years and graduated last December - was drafted earlier this year by the Rapids and has played in more than half of the team's games this season.

A former member of the Under-16, Under-18, and Under-21 Israeli National teams, and a semifinalist for the Hermann Award as the nation's best collegiate soccer player, Melamad certainly knows something about intense competition. But his pre-season with the Rapids in Ecuador was an eye-opener, in more ways than one.

"Our first game in Ecuador took place in front of 30,000 fans," he said. "It was crazy; they had fireworks in the stands, the place was packed. I have never played in that kind of atmosphere. I played that whole game, and it was definitely an experience I will remember for the rest of my life."

Since then, Melamad says, he's been trying to adjust to the MLS level of play while getting to see Los Angeles, Chicago, Miami and other parts of the US. "This has been a great experience for me," said Melamad, who is finishing up a master's degree in accounting at CSOM.

Much as Melamad - number 18 on your program - is looking forward to his stopover in the area, he said, "I'm not sure if I'll have a chance to visit BC."

-SS

Nice finish

New graduate Jonathan Lennon had already earned a prestigious honor before his senior year, as an honorable mention on the 2004 USA Today All-USA College Academic Team. But he took another prize on his way out the door this month: the 2005 W. Seavey Joyce, SJ, Award, which was presented in a ceremony on May 12.

Lennon was cited for his leadership in forming the Boston Inter-Collegiate Service Organization, a student-run non-profit that claims 10 campus chapters devoted to community service and charitable fund-raising. He also helped lead a successful campaign to have smoking banned in residence halls on the Boston College campus.

The Milford, Ct., native plans to work in Senegal with the United Nations Development Program.

-SS

Good sports all

Four Boston College student-athletes have received the Athletic Association's first annual Richard "Moe" Maloney Service Award for their participation in various community activities during their undergraduate careers.

Senior football player Myran Hunter of Tallahassee, Fla., and three juniors, football player Mathias Kiwanuka (Indianapolis, Ind.), women's soccer player Meghan Nadolski (Essex Falls, Vt.) and field hockey player Sara York (Watertown, Mass.) shared the award, named in honor of Maloney, the former Boston College baseball coach who now is assistant to the director of the Boston College Neighborhood Center in Brighton.

The awards were presented on May 6 at the Athletic Association's annual banquet in Conte Forum.

Head Equipment Manager Joe Shirley, an advisor to the Student Athlete Advisory Board that sponsors various service opportunities, said Hunter was honored for his work with a young man who was hospitalized after a drive-by shooting incident that left him paralyzed. The victim has since been released from the hospital and lives in his own apartment.

Kiwanuka received his honor for his organizational efforts on behalf of SAAB's athlete visitation program at the Franciscan Hospital. He recruited teammates to take part in hospital visits and participated himself in every SAAB activity held at the hospital throughout the academic year, Shirley said.

Nadolski organized a shoe collection drive for a poor African village among student-athletes and BCAA staff that netted more than 500 pairs of footwear.

Community Affairs Director William Mills was honored by Kids' Karate, a non-profit youth karate program, on May 14 at the groupís annual exhibition in the Conte Forum Power Gym. Mills and the Athletic Association helped arrange for the University to host the Kidsí Karate show beginning in 1991. (Photo by Frank Curran)

York led a t-shirt sales campaign that generated enough money to provide a big-screen television set and six DVD players for the patient activity rooms at the Franciscan Hospital for Children.

"I've been in sports for a long time, and I've seen a lot of awards," said Maloney, a 1960 graduate. "But if I had to pick one to have my name on it, this is the one I would choose."

Two varsity teams were also presented with the Athletic Association's new Ignatian Service Award at the dinner in recognition of volunteer work throughout the year. The women's ice hockey team was honored for winning a competition among all 31 Eagle teams in Thanksgiving food and clothing collection drives and the football team was chosen for its strong participation in the Franciscan Hospital visitation program.

-RO

Tech teaching

Blackboards and chalk dust may still be the classic classroom icons, but at Boston College they're getting competition from the likes of WebCT and PowerPoint.

Eleven BC faculty members were presented with "Teaching with New Media" awards for their use of the Internet and related pedagogical technology at "eTeaching Day" held May 19. Academic Technology Services sponsored the event.

Students nominated faculty candidates through - what else - an on-line form, and a committee of students and administrators chose the winners. Top awards went to Asst. Prof. Michael Barnett (LSOE), Assoc. Prof. Richard Jackson (LSOE), Adj. Asst. Prof. Bonnie Jefferson (Communication), Prof. Evan Kantrowitz (Chemistry), Prof. Eric Strauss (Biology) and Assoc. Prof. Rita Olivieri (CSON).

Others receiving honors were Asst. Prof. Sheila Gallagher (Fine Arts), Asst. Prof. Holly Harner (CSON), Asst. Prof. Belle Liang (LSOE), Assoc. Prof. Stephen Schloesser. SJ (History), and Adj. Asst. Prof. Prof. Christopher Wood (Romance Languages).

Fittingly enough, both sets of faculty received state-of-technology prizes for their efforts. The top winners were presented with Apple iPods, while the runners-up took home Flash drives.

-SG

Finney goes 'Pops'

John Finney may have his "day job" as director of BC's University Chorale, but he does plenty of other gigs, too. During the past two weeks, Finney sat in with the Boston Pops Orchestra as organist during their performances of Respighi's "Pines of Rome" and Saint-Saens "Organ Symphony."

In fact, Finney was at the keyboard last Friday for the special "Boston College Family Night at the Pops" event at Symphony Hall. The concert also featured BC's popular singing duo, twin brothers Anthony and Will Nunziata '06, who opened the evening with the Alma Mater and "For Boston."

On July 8, Finney will be in the spotlight when he plays with the Boston Symphony Orchestra's opening concert at Tanglewood. The BSO, conducted by James Levine, will perform Mahler's Eighth Symphony, which includes a prominent organ solo.

-SS

Glittering achievement

Assumption University has awarded Prof. Thomas Groome (Theology), director of the University's Institute for Religious Education and Pastoral Ministry, the Christian Culture Gold Medal for the year 2005-06, in recognition of his "exemplary scholarship, teaching and dedication in the field of Catholic education."

In a letter to Groome, Assumption President and Vice-Chancellor Mario D'Souza, CSB, said, "Your work as teacher, scholar and mentor are well recognized, and you have served your Catholic faith with exemplary care and devotion...In all, you have made your contribution inspired by your own Christian faith and values, and strengthened by that faith you have shared God's goodness with all those whom you have met and taught."

Previous winners of the Christian Culture Gold Medal include such luminaries as Robert Coles, Henry Ford II, Barbara Ward, Peter Drucker, Benjamin Mays, Dorothy Day and Marshall McLuhan. Groome is the second BC faculty member to earn the award: Monan Professor of Theology Lisa Sowle Cahill was the 1991 winner.

-SS

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