ROMANTICISM: Artistic and intellectual movement that originated in the late 18th century and stressed strong emotion, imagination, freedom from classical art forms, and rebellion against social conventions. Romanticism is found in many works of literature, painting, music, architecture, criticism, and historiography, and can be defined as a rejection of the precepts of order, calm, harmony, balance, idealization, and rationality that typified Classicism in general and late 18th-century Neo-classicism in particular. It was also to a large extent a reaction against the Enlightenment against undue emphasis upon rationalism and economic materialism such as was characterized in capitalism. Romanticism emphasized the individual, the subjective, the irrational, the imaginative, the personal, the spontaneous, the emotional, the visionary, and the transcendental. Finally, in the area of color, the romantics clearly distanced themselves from the neo-classicists for whom color was always subservient to the design. For romantics, color was the life and soul of a picture and was in itself capable of building up form without recourse to contour-lines. The pre-eminent pioneer in this direction was Turner.

In summation Romanticism stressed:

The first figures on these pages reflect a sort of transition, and consist of three men whose imaginative and visionary paintings had a tremendous impact upon the subsequent romantics, without themselves being painters of the first rank: Henry Fuseli [Füssli], William Blake, and Francisco de Goya y Lucientes.

The second set of painters include the extraordinary landscape artists: John Constable, William Turner, and Caspar David Friedrich. These painters turned to nature both as a source of inspiration, and as a powerful symbol of their own personalities. Far from being merely "pretty pictures," their works magnificently portray the romantic spirit in full bloom.

The third set of painters continue in the landscape tradition, but here the scenes become imaginary and often frighteningly overpowerful. This collection includes John Martin, Somebody Wiersk, and someone else.

The final set of romantic painters include the French masters: Delacroix and Gericault. .

 The Pre-Romantics

Henry Fuseli [Füssli], William Blake, and Francisco de Goya y Lucientes.

Early Romantic Landscapes

John Constable, William Turner, and Caspar David Friedrich

 

  

 Füssli: Nightmare

Constable: Dedham Vale

The third set of painters continue in the landscape tradition, but here the scenes become imaginary and often frightingly overpowering. This collection includes John Martin, Somebody Wiersk, and someone else.

The final set of romantic painters include the great French masters: Delacroix and Gericault.

 

Romantic Landscapists

John Martin, Wiersk, etc.

 The Great Romantics

Delacroix and Gericault

  

 

Martin: Waters

 Gericault: Insanity

 

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 Show Slide Show - Romantic Paintings