Summer session


Over the summer, the Lynch School offers courses that will help you learn new skills, advance your knowledge, and advance your career. Two summer sessions are packed with learning opportunities for novice and experienced professionals in higher education, educational leadership, teacher education, applied psychology, and measurement and analysis.

Offerings begin May 15 and extend through August 13. They include one-credit and non-credit professional development short courses; one-credit, online courses; and courses that apply to our degree programs and to certificates and specializations in Child and Family Mental Health, Positive Youth Development, Autism Spectrum Disorder, Institutional Research, and Assessment Literacy and Data Use for Educators.

Register For Courses Today

Institute for Administrators in Catholic Higher Education (ELHE750201)

Each July, the Institute for Administrators in Catholic Higher Education hosts a four-day seminar providing a singular opportunity for administrators and leaders at Catholic colleges and universities around the globe to interact with some of the nation’s most outstanding scholars and practitioners as they address issues that Catholic higher education leaders face on a daily basis. Course assignments include readings as assigned, and several brief reflection papers. More information about the Institute is on the website.

M T W TH 9:00–4:00 p.m.
July 23–July 26
Michael James, Lecturer; Director Institute for Administrators in Catholic Higher Education

Teaching and Learning Issues for Higher Education Administrators and Leaders (ELHE731001)

This intensive two-day course exposes higher education professionals who work outside the classroom to the ongoing debates and issues surrounding teaching and learning at colleges and universities. This course will assist postsecondary administrators and leaders in their roles supporting student learning, working with faculty, and setting conditions for best practices in classroom learning. Course activities will include scenarios, team activities, independent reflections, and debates aimed at unpacking the realities of issues such as ‘progressive pedagogy,’ controversies in teaching and learning, the adult learner, student voice, course evaluations, and the use of technology for learning.

Fri 8:30 a.m.–4:30 p.m.; Sat 9:00 a.m.–1:00 p.m.
May 18–19
Keisha Valez, Ed.D., Senior Instructional Developer, Boston College Center for Teaching Excellence

Online Higher Education: Challenges and Opportunities (ELHE731101)

The vast majority of postsecondary institutions now offer some form of online education, and it continues to grow. How might we explain the relatively rapid rise of online education? What effects does it have on the postsecondary education landscape? How are practitioners impacted by these shifts, and how are they responding? These questions will guide our two-week, fully online exploration of online education, including two required virtual conferencing sessions on May 24 and 31.

Conferencing sessions May 24 and May 31 7:00–8:00 p.m.
Online May 21–June 6
No classes Monday May 21 for Commencement—Makeup day: Friday, May 25
No classes Monday May 29 for Memorial Day—Makeup day: Friday, June 1 
No classes Wednesday July 4 for Independence Day 
Brian Blakely, M.A., Associate Director, Boston College Center for Teaching Excellence

College Student Mental Illness: Campus Responses (ELHE/APSY720501)

Issues surrounding mental health strategies and policies on college campuses have risen significantly in the past two decades. As a result, higher education professionals have needed to increase their understanding to work with, and work for, a population that has surged exponentially. Unlike courses using counseling theories for clinical practitioners, this two-day intensive course will prepare participants for program management and policy development that meets the safety, legal, community, and individual needs related to campus mental health issues. The goal is to deliver a solid, practical foundation for administrators dealing with this complex matter.

Fri 8:30 a.m.–4:30 p.m.; Sat 9:00 a.m.–1:00 p.m.
June 8–9
Richard DeCapua, Ph.D., Associate Dean, Boston College Office of Student Conduct

Contemporary Student Activism (ELHE/APSY730601)

This two-day intensive course utilizes experiential learning techniques to explore contemporary student activism from historic foundations, present-day causes, and possible burgeoning motivations for student protests and activism. The course presents activism as contributing to college student development and as a continuing catalyst for changing the role of higher education in America. Students in the course will work in task groups to understand and experience administrators’ roles in addressing student activism.

Fri 8:30 a.m.–4:30 p.m.; Sat 9:00 a.m.–1:00 p.m.
June 15–16
Vanessa Johnson, Ed.D., Associate Professor and Director, Northeastern University College Student of Student Development and Counseling Program

Human Resource Administration (ELHE444901)

Addresses fundamental school personnel functions such as hiring, retention, socialization, rewards and sanctions, and performance appraisal. These functions, however, are situated in a broader approach to the human and professional development of school personnel in a learning organization. Situates human resource development within the larger agenda of increased quality of student learning and teacher development.

M T W TH F 8:00–4:00 p.m.
July 9–20
Rebecca Lowenhaupt, Assistant Professor
PSAP COHORT V

Catholic Higher Education Administration and Leadership (ELHE750101)

This course explores contemporary issues, organizational and governance structures, and distinct characteristics of successful leadership for administrators at Catholic colleges and universities, focusing on effective campus policy development, strategic planning, and assessment. Students will engage current research, historical literature, Church documents, lectures, and group exercises. A unique component to this course is participation in the Institute for Administrators in Catholic Higher Education—a four-day seminar for senior administrators and leaders in Catholic higher education from around the globe, where internationally recognized scholars and practitioners address the challenges and opportunities that Catholic higher education faces on a daily basis. Students participate in four seminars, class meetings, and the four full days of the Institute. Course assignments include readings as assigned, two research papers, and several brief reflection papers. More information about the Institute is on the website.

T TH 4:30–7:00 p.m.
July 10–31
Michael James, Lecturer; Director Institute for Administrators in Catholic Higher Education

Counseling Techniques in Higher Education (ELHE740301)

Provides an introduction to theoretically-based counseling skills for professionals in higher education and other education and community settings. The areas of communications skills involving the use of role-playing, observation, and practice components are emphasized. Postsecondary case studies cover a range of counseling issues and are applicable to a wide range of settings involving late adolescents and adults. (Not appropriate for Mental Health or School Counseling students)

M W 4:30–7:00 p.m.
May 16–June 25
No classes Monday May 21 for Commencement—Makeup day: Friday, May 25 
No classes Monday May 29 for Memorial Day—Makeup day: Friday, June 1 

Using Data and Evidence for School Improvements (ELHE771101)

This course prepares leaders to manage initiatives around continuous improvement and data-informed inquiry. On one hand, students will develop basic research skills that will contribute to evidence-based school improvement, including action research. On the other hand, students will explore the landscape of supports and barriers to using data and other evidence effectively in schools. In particular, students will explore the role of leadership in: the appropriate use and design of assessments; fostering a positive cycle of inquiry among educators; and the effective use of information systems and other technologies.

T TH 4:00–7:00 p.m.
May 17–June 26
No classes Monday May 21 for Commencement—Makeup day: Friday, May 25 
No classes Monday May 29 for Memorial Day—Makeup day: Friday, June 1 
Vincent Cho, Associate Professor

Global Perspectives on Higher Education Leadership and Management (ELHE780401)

This course is delivered fully online, but does require some synchronous participation. It aims to provide students with an understanding of the multi-dimensional nature of contemporary higher education leadership and management and to examine these issues from a comparative and international perspective. Strong emphasis is placed on the global context and appreciating how different national contexts and issues impact and affect higher education. Students learn about different issues and experiences directly from leaders, practitioners, and case studies, and are encouraged to draw upon their own experiences—as university administrators, policy makers, faculty, or researchers—at the country and institutional level.

ONLINE: Tuesday 4:00 p.m.
May 22–June 26
No classes Monday May 29 for Memorial Day—Makeup day: Friday, June 1 
Ellen Hazelkorn

Global Perspectives on Finance and Funding in Higher Education (ELHE780601)

This course is delivered fully online, but does require some synchronous participation. It aims to provide students with an understanding of the complexities of higher education financing, through a comparative and international perspective. The course analyzes the rising cost of higher education and how this has led to different financing schemes in different national contexts. Students will learn about the different issues directly from experts and case studies, and get to reflect on their own experiences at the national and institutional levels.

ONLINE: Wednesday 4:00 p.m.
May 16–June 20
No classes Monday May 21 for Commencement—Makeup day: Friday, May 25 
No classes Monday May 29 for Memorial Day—Makeup day: Friday, June 1 
Ariane de Gayardon

Transforming the Field of Catholic Education (ELHE750501)

This course explores the history, purpose, current status, and possible futures of Catholic elementary and secondary schools. Students will become conversant with the body of scholarly literature, theoretical and empirical, that defines the field of Catholic education. Though the primary focus will be on Catholic schools in the United States, the course will explore how we can learn from the experience of other religiously affiliated schools here and abroad, and from the experience of Catholic educators worldwide. Special attention will be devoted to how the Ignatian spirituality and pedagogy can be a resource for educators in Jesuit and non-Jesuit schools.

M W 4:00–6:00 p.m.
July 2–August 13
No classes Wednesday July 4 for Independence Day 
Martin Scanlan, Associate Professor

 

 

 

Theories of Instruction (EDUC742101)

This course provides an in-depth review of modern instructional models classified into selected families with regard to perception of knowledge, the learner, curriculum, instruction, and evaluation. Each student will be asked to survey models in his/her own field(s) and to select, describe, and defend a personal theory in light of today’s educational settings based upon personal experiences, reflection on current research, and contemporary issues central to the education of all learners.

M T W 9:00–3:00 p.m.
June 25–July 9
No classes Wednesday July 4 for Independence Day 
Audrey Friedman, Associate Professor
UCTC and others

Teaching Bilingual Students/Elementary Ed (EDUC63460)

Deals practically with instruction of teaching English Language Learners, Sheltered English Immersion, and mainstream classrooms. Reviews and applies literacy and content area instructional approaches. Includes such other topics as history and legislation related to English Language Learners and bilingual education, and the influences of language and culture on students, instruction, curriculum, and assessment.

M W 4:00–7:00 p.m.
May 16–June 25
No classes Monday May 21 for Commencement—Makeup day: Friday, May 25 
No classes Monday May 29 for Memorial Day—Makeup day: Friday, June 1 
Jasmine Alvarado (Doc student)

Management of the Behavior of Students with Special Needs (EDUC637401)

The behavior management challenges presented by some students with special needs are addressed in this course. Following discussion on the diagnosis and functional analysis of these behaviors, substantial emphasis is given to the practical application of applied behavior analysis techniques. Alternative and/or cooperative strategies for classroom use are also discussed.

T TH 4:00–7:00 p.m.
May 17–June 26
No classes Monday May 21 for Commencement—Makeup day: Friday, May 25 
No classes Monday May 29 for Memorial Day—Makeup day: Friday, June 1 
Thomas Keane, Part-Time Faculty

Social Contexts of Education (EDUC743501)

Examines the historic and evolving development of the major social factors that together create the diverse, competing, and often unequal social contexts influencing the quality and type of education different groups of students experience in particular school sites and across school sites. Major requirements for the course include creating a sociological portrait of a selected school site and developing an interdisciplinary curriculum unit/action project focusing on key issues facing the community and/or the school and its students.

M W 4:00–7:00 p.m.
May 16–June 25
No classes Monday May 21 for Commencement—Makeup day: Friday, May 25 
No classes Monday May 29 for Memorial Day—Makeup day: Friday, June 1 
Raquel Saenz (Doc Student)

Teaching Writing (EDUC747301)

In this course, developing and sustaining a writing curriculum for teachers in K-12 will be practiced and discussed, including a variety of pedagogical approaches to developing a sustained and enjoyable classroom writing culture. The primary emphasis will be on learning through doing—students will write in a variety of genres themselves (poetry, short fiction, memoir, reader response essay) with group discussion on process and implementation of their individual classroom and based on their students’ needs. Grade is based on a portfolio of finished writing and a strategic plan for implementing writing protocols and ideas in the classroom.

T TH 4:00–7:00 p.m.
May 17–June 26
No classes Monday May 21 for Commencement—Makeup day: Friday, May 25 
No classes Monday May 29 for Memorial Day—Makeup day: Friday, June 1 
Nicole Roussos (Doc Student)

Deaf/Blind Seminar (EDUC749201)

Presents histories of deaf, blind, and deaf/blind services. Discusses various etiologies of deaf-blindness along with their implications for intervention with persons with deaf-blindness. Provides overview of legislation and litigation relating to special services for individuals with deaf-blindness. Students complete a project relating to services for persons with multiple disabilities. Several guest speakers representing various agencies and organizations serving individuals with deaf-blindness present this course.

T TH 5:30–8:30 p.m.
May 17–June 26
No classes Monday May 21 for Commencement—Makeup day: Friday, May 25 
No classes Monday May 29 for Memorial Day—Makeup day: Friday, June 1 
Thomas Miller, Part-Time Faculty

Social Studies & the Arts (EDUC752901)

This course is designed to help students examine historical interpretation with critical analysis through history and the arts. It explores different areas of content and instructional methods directly related to Massachusetts Curriculum Frameworks in social studies, literature, and the arts.

T TH 4:00–7:00 p.m.
May 17–June 26
No classes Monday May 21 for Commencement—Makeup day: Friday, May 25 
No classes Monday May 29 for Memorial Day—Makeup day: Friday, June 1 
Shanee Wangia (Doc Student)

Bilingualism, Second Language, and Literacy Development (EDUC762101)

Explores first and second language and literacy development of children raised bilingually as well as students acquiring a second language during pre-school, elementary, or secondary school years. Also addresses theories of first and second language acquisition, literacy development in the second language, and factors affecting second language and literacy learning. Participants will assess the development of one aspect of language or language skill of a bilingual individual and draw implications for instruction, parent involvement, and policy.

M W 4:00–7:00 p.m.
May 16–June 25
No classes Monday May 21 for Commencement—Makeup day: Friday, May 25 
No classes Monday May 29 for Memorial Day—Makeup day: Friday, June 1 
Renata Love Jones (Doc Student)

Teaching Bilingual Students in Secondary Education (EDUC634701)

Deals practically with instruction of teaching English Language Learners, Sheltered English Immersion, and mainstream classrooms. Reviews and applies literacy and content area instructional approaches. Includes other topics such as history and legislation related to English Language Learners and bilingual education, and the influences of language and culture on students, instruction, curriculum, and assessment.

M W 4:00–7:00 p.m.
July 2–August 13
No classes Wednesday July 4 for Independence Day 
Renata Love Jones (Doc Student)

Human Development and Disabilities (EDUC649501)

This course addresses the reciprocal relationship between human development and disability. Prenatal, perinatal, and postnatal causes of disability will be presented. Students will learn about theoretical perspectives, research, and current disagreements related to causes, identification, and treatment of disabilities. Prevention and intervention strategies will be presented for each disability. The application of assistive technology will be covered across disabilities.

M W 4:00–7:00 p.m.
July 2–August 13
No classes Wednesday July 4 for Independence Day 
Allison Nannemann (Doc Student)

Assessment and Instruction for Students with Reading Difficulty (EDUC659501)

Examines the methods and materials related to formal and informal assessment, analysis, and interpretation of the results of assessment and instructional techniques for students with a range of reading difficulties (K-12). Focus is on the needs of students from varied populations.

T TH 4:00–7:00 p.m.
July 3–August 9
Joelle Pedersen (Doc Student)

Social Contexts of Education (EDUC743502)

Examines the role of situational, school, community, peer, and family factors on the education of children. Participants in the course will strive to understand the effects of their own social context on their education, to develop strategies to help students understand their context, and to understand and contribute to what schools can do to improve teaching and learning and school culture for all students regardless of internal and external variables.

T TH 12:30–3:30 p.m.
July 3–August 9th

Social Contexts of Education (EDUC743508)

Examines the role of situational, school, community, peer, and family factors on the education of children. Participants in the course will strive to understand the effects of their own social context on their education, to develop strategies to help students understand their context, and to understand and contribute to what schools can do to improve teaching and learning and school culture for all students regardless of internal and external variables.

T TH 12:30 – 3:30 p.m.
July 3–August 9th
DONOVAN ONLY

Instruction of Students with Special Needs and Diverse Learners (EDUC743801)

This course focuses on the education of students with disabilities and other learners from culturally and linguistically diverse backgrounds. The goal of the course is to promote access to the general curriculum for all students through participation in standards-based reform. Universal Design for Learning (UDL) provides the theoretical framework for this course. Through an examination of historical milestones, landmark legislation, systems for classification, approaches to intervention, and the daily life experiences of diverse learners, students acquire knowledge about diversity and the resources, services, and supports available for creating a more just society through education.

T TH 4:00–7:00 p.m.
July 3–August 9
Scott Lapinski (Doc Student)

Instruction of Students with Special Needs and Diverse Learners (EDUC743808)

This course focuses on the education of students with disabilities and other learners from culturally and linguistically diverse backgrounds. The goal of the course is to promote access to the general curriculum for all students through participation in standards-based reform. Universal Design for Learning (UDL) provides the theoretical framework for this course. Through an examination of historical milestones, landmark legislation, systems for classification, approaches to intervention, and the daily life experiences of diverse learners, students acquire knowledge about diversity and the resources, services, and supports available for creating a more just society through education.

M W 1:00–4:00 p.m.
July 2–August 13
No classes Wednesday July 4 for Independence Day 
Richard Cass, Part-Time Faculty

Bilingualism, Second Language, and Literacy Development (EDUC762102)

Explores first and second language and literacy development of children raised bilingually as well as students acquiring a second language during pre-school, elementary, or secondary school years. Also addresses theories of first and second language acquisition, literacy development in the second language, and factors affecting second language and literacy learning. Participants will assess the development of one aspect of language or language skill of a bilingual individual and draw implications for instruction, parent involvement, and policy.

T TH 4:00–7:00 p.m.
July 3–August 9
Qianqian Zhang-Wu (Doc Student)

 

College Student Mental Illness: Campus Responses (ELHE/APSY720501)

Issues surrounding mental health strategies and policies on college campuses have risen significantly in the past two decades. As a result, higher education professionals have needed to increase their understanding to work with, and work for, a population that has surged exponentially. Unlike courses using counseling theories for clinical practitioners, this two-day intensive course will prepare participants for program management and policy development that meets the safety, legal, community, and individual needs related to campus mental health issues. The goal is to deliver a solid, practical foundation for administrators dealing with this complex matter.

Fri 8:30 a.m.–4:30 p.m.; Sat 9:00 a.m.–1:00 p.m.
June 8–9
Richard DeCapua, Ph.D., Associate Dean, Boston College Office of Student Conduct

Contemporary Student Activism (ELHE/APSY730601)

This two-day intensive course utilizes experiential learning techniques to explore contemporary student activism from historic foundations, present-day causes, and possible burgeoning motivations for student protests and activism. The course presents activism as contributing to college student development and as a continuing catalyst for changing the role of higher education in America. Students in the course will work in task groups to understand and experience administrators’ roles in addressing student activism.

Fri 8:30 a.m.–4:30 p.m.; Sat 9:00 a.m.–1:00 p.m.
June 15–16
Vanessa Johnson, Ed.D., Associate Professor and Director, Northeastern University College Student of Student Development and Counseling Program

Voice in Research (APSY746301)

This course is designed for students with prior coursework in research methods. The course will critically examine how the voices of participants (particularly marginalized individuals) are represented in research and how researchers use their voices when disseminating findings to academic and lay audiences. Selected topics include: impact validity, catalytic validity, provocative generalizability, psychopolitical validity, and strong objectivity. Voice will be utilized as a unifying framework to critically analyze the underlying values and assumptions of the research process and the ability of researchers to use their work for social change.

T TH 4:00–7:00 p.m.
May 16–June 26
No classes Monday May 21 for Commencement—Makeup day: Friday, May 25 
No classes Monday May 29 for Memorial Day—Makeup day: Friday, June 1 
MaryBeth Medvide, Part-Time Faculty

Multicultural Issues (APSY752801)

Assists students to become more effective in their work with ethnic minority and LGBT clients. Increases students’ awareness of their own and others’ life experiences, and how these impact the way in which we approach interactions with individuals who are different from us. Examines the sociopolitical conditions that impact individuals from ethnic and non-ethnic minority groups in the U.S., and presents an overview of relevant research.

M W 4:00–7:00 p.m.
May 16–June 25
No classes Monday May 21 for Commencement—Makeup day: Friday, May 25 
No classes Monday May 29 for Memorial Day—Makeup day: Friday, June 1 
Uma Millner, Part-Time Faculty

Sport Psychology (APSY753001)

This graduate course explores the science and practice of sport and exercise psychology with two applied themes: sport-based youth development and sport for social justice. Course content will include individual factors such as personality, motivation, anxiety, exercise adherence, and addictive and unhealthy behaviors, as well as social and environmental factors such as group cohesion, coaching efficacy, parental influence, and character development. The course will challenge students to connect principles of sport and exercise psychology to sport-based youth development and sport for peace and social justice. Therefore, aspects of the course will also utilize a sociological/sociocultural lens. Discussions and assignments will explore practical implications for various applied psychology settings including schools, communities, and sport and recreation organizations.

M W 4:00–7:00 p.m.
May 16–June 25
No classes Monday May 21 for Commencement—Makeup day: Friday, May 25 
No classes Monday May 29 for Memorial Day—Makeup day: Friday, June 1 
Kristina Moore, Part-Time Faculty Psychology

Ethical and Legal Issues in Counseling Psychology (APSY760501)

Topics include professional codes and ethical principles; laws governing mental health professions; confidentiality, privacy and record keeping; client rights and malpractice; issues in supervision; dual role relationships; psychological assessment; and, issues specific to minorities, children and specialized treatment modalities and techniques. Emphasis is on the preparation of mental health counselors and other mental health professionals.

T TH 1:00–4:00 p.m.
May 17–June 26
No classes Monday May 21 for Commencement—Makeup day: Friday, May 25 
No classes Monday May 29 for Memorial Day—Makeup day: Friday, June 1 
Uma Millner, Part-Time Faculty

Ethical and Legal Issues in School Counseling (APSY760601)

Guided by the ethical codes of the American School Counselor Association (ASCA) and the American Counseling Association (ACA), a wide range of legal and ethical conflicts that school counselors encounter will be discussed. Specific topics will include school counselors’ ethical and legal duties as they pertain to confidentiality, suspected child abuse/neglect, mental health referral and treatment, students at risk to themselves and/or others, students involved in the juvenile justice system, bullying, the rights of LGBTQ students, and special education. Knowledge of multicultural school counseling competencies and ethical issues that are related to social justice will be emphasized.

M W 4:00–7:00 p.m.
May 16–June 25
No classes Monday May 21 for Commencement—Makeup day: Friday, May 25 
No classes Monday May 29 for Memorial Day—Makeup day: Friday, June 1 
Julie MacEvoy, Associate Professor of the Practice

Issues in Counseling Men (APSY744101)

Examines issues related to counseling men by examining the influence of socially constructed roles on men, their families, and broader society. Specifically examines how men’s roles impact their personal development through the life span as well as on men’s health, roles as partners and fathers, and how men approach mental health services. Covers issues specific to counseling men from access to services to creating therapeutic environments for men. Uses case analysis of transcripts and videotapes.

T TH 1:00–4:00 p.m.
May 17–June 26
No classes Monday May 21 for Commencement—Makeup day: Friday, May 25 
No classes Monday May 29 for Memorial Day—Makeup day: Friday, June 1 
James Mahalik, Professor

Biological Bases of Behavior (APSY874501)

This course reviews a variety of topics within the biological bases of behavior, employing a neuroanatomical starting point. Students learn neuroanatomy in some detail; moreover, the course explores basic mechanics of the nervous system, basic psychopharmacology, and sensation and perception. Also examines cognitive functions associated with different regions of the brain as well as neurodevelopmental, psychiatric, and neurological disorders. In addition, students will have the opportunity to read some of the more contemporary writings in the field of neuroscience.

M W 4:00–7:00 p.m.
May 16–June 25
No classes Monday May 21 for Commencement—Makeup day: Friday, May 25 
No classes Monday May 29 for Memorial Day—Makeup day: Friday, June 1 
Jeffrey Lamoureux, Senior Lecturer, Psychology

Applied Child Development (APSY741801)

This course will help teachers understand principles of learning and cognitive, linguistic, social, and affective development as they apply to classroom practices. Students will focus on the acquisition of strategies that enable them to assess and understand how they and the children they work with are constructors of meaning. This course is designed for individuals beginning their professional development in education who plan to work with children.

M W 4:00–7:00 p.m.
July 2–August 13
No classes Wednesday July 4 for Independence Day 
MaryBeth Medvide, Part-Time Faculty

Applied Adolescent Development (APSY741901)

This course is designed to provide students with an overview of the theoretical and empirical knowledge base concerning adolescent development. In particular, four broad areas will be considered: (1) psychological, biological, and cognitive transitions; (2) central developmental tasks of adolescence; (3) primary contextual influences; and (4) prevalent types of problematic functioning that emerge during adolescence. The overarching goals of the course are to provide a solid and broad understanding of how and why adolescents develop in the manner they do, and to extend this developmental understanding into research, application, and practice.

T TH 4:00–7:00 p.m.
July 3–August 9
MaryBeth Medvide, Part-Time Faculty

Psychology of Drug and Alcohol Abuse (APSY752901)

Designed for the student who is interested in the study of both the theoretical and applied aspects of alcohol and substance abuse. The course will focus on the psychological, physiological, sociological, and economic aspects of addiction in society.

T TH 1:00–4:00 p.m.
July 3–August 9
Kiley Gottschalk, Part-Time Faculty

Ethical and Legal Issues in Mental Health Counseling (APSY760502)

Topics include professional codes and ethical principles; laws governing mental health professions; confidentiality, privacy and record keeping; client rights and malpractice; issues in supervision; dual role relationships; psychological assessment; and, issues specific to minorities, children and specialized treatment modalities and techniques. Emphasis is on the preparation of mental health counselors and other mental health professionals.

M W 4:00–7:00 p.m.
July 2–August 13
No classes Wednesday July 4 for Independence Day 
Uma Millner, Part-Time Faculty

Introduction to Play Therapy (APSY764201)

Examination of various theoretical approaches to play therapy as a treatment modality for school age and preschool children. Discusses techniques, methods, and processes of play therapy, as well as strengths and limitations of this treatment approach.

T TH 4:00–7:00 p.m.
July 3–August 9
Vanessa Prosper, Part-Time Faculty

Interpretation and Evaluation of Research (ERME746001/APSY746001)

This course will improve a student’s understanding of the empirical research literature in education and psychology. It concentrates on developing the conceptual foundations of empirical research and the practical analytic skills needed by a competent reader and user of research articles. Topics address purpose statements, hypotheses, sampling techniques, sample sizes and power, instrument development, internal and external validity, and typical quantitative research designs. Exercises emphasize the critical evaluation of published research. Each student will develop a research proposal.

T TH 4:00–7:00 p.m.
July 3–August 9
Herbert Turner III , Part-Time Faculty

Interpretation and Evaluation of Research (ERME746001/APSY746001)

This course will improve a student’s understanding of the empirical research literature in education and psychology. It concentrates on developing the conceptual foundations of empirical research and the practical analytic skills needed by a competent reader and user of research articles. Topics address purpose statements, hypotheses, sampling techniques, sample sizes and power, instrument development, internal and external validity, and typical quantitative research designs. Exercises emphasize the critical evaluation of published research. Each student will develop a research proposal.

T TH 4:00–7:00 p.m.
July 3–August 9
Herbert Turner III , Part-Time Faculty