Skip to main content

Breadcrumb navigation:

Advent Reflections Archive

2013

open gift box
Christmas Day

The Catholic tradition calls us to another way of celebrating. In our liturgical calendar, Christmas is an octave (eight days) that begins Christmas Eve and ends on January 1. There is the familiar tradition of the twelve days of Christmas, which begin on Christmas Eve and end on Epiphany, traditionally celebrated on January 6. And the Church’s Season of Christmas starts on December 24 and ends on the Feast of the Baptism of the Lord, which we will celebrate on January 12, 2014. As we come to the end of these on-line reflections here at Boston College, I urge you to savor the extended days of Christmas during the weeks following December 25. 

» Click here to read more

small wooden nativity set
Fourth Sunday of Advent

In the year 1223, Saint Francis of Assisi began a practice by which Christians have engaged in a creative imagining of the circumstances of Christ’s birth.  For centuries, this season has been marked by a representation variously called the crèche, the manger, or the nativity scene. Nativity scenes reflect the rich array of cultures in which Christians live; some nativity scenes are large and elaborate, and others are beautiful in their simplicity.

» Click here to read more

looking up at snow-covered Gasson Hall
Third Sunday of Advent

Among the happiest memories of my childhood are visits to the Boston College campus with my father, a member of the class of 1950.

» Click here to read more

earth
Second Sunday of Advent

During these days between a late Thanksgiving holiday and Christmas Day, we are invited to consider the Incarnation, which brought to the weary world a vision of God’s dream for humanity. » Click here to read more

lighting candles for advent wreath
First Sunday of Advent

During Advent, “We celebrate the coming of God into our world and into our lives,” Fr. Joseph O’Keefe tells us. Based on the Spiritual Exercises of St. Ignatius, Fr. O’Keefe offers a step-by-step guide to praying the Examen so that we may “reflect on the coming of God into our lives here and now.” » Click here to read more

2012

Reflections by Randy Sachs, S.J., ’69, MA’73

Randy Sachs, S.J., is an associate professor of systematic theology at the Boston College School of Theology and Ministry. Fr. Sachs theological interests include creation, eschatology, theological anthropology, the doctrine of God, and the theology of Karl Rahner.  He is also involved in spiritual direction and retreat work. » Click here to learn more

First Sunday of Advent

The season of Advent is upon us again. It sneaks up, doesn’t it?  At least that’s the way I feel. The fall semester here at the School of Theology and Ministry where I teach is just about over (how did that happen?!) and that means a lot of student papers to read. Which makes me wonder when I will actually be able to get to those Christmas cards I picked up at the Museum of Fine Arts last week. I always tell myself that as long as I mail them before the twelve days of Christmas are up, I’m fine. Oh, almost forgot about Christmas presents for my family. Please, Lord, please help me come up with something better for my nieces and nephews than iTunes card gifts! All in all, Advent may well be the liturgical season that is hardest to get into. I say that because everything around us is trying to make these precious weeks into a kind of non-stop, get-ready-for-Christmas marathon. » Click here to read more

Second Sunday of Advent

The opening lines of the first reading for Wednesday of the Second Week of Advent (Isaiah 40:25-31) caught my eye because they speak of the stars, and I like to look at the stars, especially at this time of year. “To whom can you liken me as an equal? says the Holy One. Lift up your eyes on high and see who has created these things: he leads out their army and numbers them, calling them all by name. By his great might and the strength of his power not one of them is missing!” (Isaiah 40:25-26) » Click here to read more

Third Sunday of Advent

Advent is a season of joy, and the third Sunday of Advent highlights this. Its traditional Latin name, “Gaudete” Sunday, means “Rejoice!” Last Sunday, the readings were full of the joyful news of deliverance and salvation. In the Gospel, Luke presented John the Baptist as the voice crying out in the desert, “Prepare the way of the Lord, make straight his paths. Every valley shall be filled and every mountain and hill shall be made low. The winding roads shall be made straight, and the rough ways made smooth, and all flesh shall see the salvation of God" (3:4-6). Prepare for the Lord’s coming and for the wideness of his mercy! (I can think of no better way to stay with these words prayerfully in Advent than to listen to the first part of Handel’s Messiah). » Click here to read more

Fourth Sunday of Advent

As I am writing this reflection, I am still stunned, as we all are, by the incomprehensible tragedy of the killing of so many small children and their teachers in Newtown, CT. To enter into the rejoicing of Gaudete Sunday seems impossible now, as I see the newspaper photos of grief-stricken parents, and the terrified faces of the children who escaped unharmed. At the same time, I find myself begging Christ to open his heart, his ears, and his arms to all the people who are suffering such devastating loss. Be near to them, Lord. Show them that your heart is breaking, too. Hear their sobbing grief. Give them the strength and courage to trust that they, too, like the loved ones they have lost, will find themselves in your loving embrace. Let us all pray together for them, whose Advent longing for the coming of the Lord in their darkness now has such a specific sharpness. » Click here to read more

Christmas Day

When I was a boy, “midnight Mass” was still celebrated at midnight. I can still remember what it felt like to walk in the darkness and into the many different parish churches of my childhood.  They were all filled with the warm light of so many candles and bursting with the bright color of what seemed like hundreds of red and white poinsettias. I was usually in the choir and before Mass started, there would always be a half an hour of Christmas carols. Back then, the darkness outside and the warm light, color, and carols inside didn’t seem like such a contrast. They seemed to go together. The darkness and quiet of the late hour evoked in a special way the expectation of the joyful celebration in which we would be singing “Silent Night” and “O Holy Night.” » Click here to read more

2011

Reflections by Sr. Maryanne Confoy, MEd’78, PhD’81

Sr. Maryanne Confoy is a Sister of Charity and a lecturer in Practical Theology and Spirituality at the Jesuit Theological College in Melbourne, Victoria, Australia. Publications include articles on spirituality and ministry; a biography of Morris West; books on spirituality and the contemplative life, the priesthood, religious life, and Christian ministry. She is a well-loved and respected Visiting Professor at the School of Theology and Ministry at Boston College.

First Sunday of Advent

While our Churches greet Advent with the penitential color of purple and solemn liturgical music and readings, our shopping malls are resplendent with diverse seasonal greetings, muzak and multiple enticements to gift-buying—two very different and even contradictory approaches to the important celebration of Christmas.  Advent’s significance can be lost in the cacophony of advertising and its diversions.  In many ways it is a more gentle season than Lent which opens with Ash Wednesday confronting us with reminders of suffering, death and the finiteness of life. In contrast, Advent opens us to the hope of a new liturgical year and prepares us for the celebration of Christ’s birth. » Click here to read more

Second Sunday of Advent

Why did it take the early Church around four hundred years to begin to celebrate Christmas and what is it that we as church today are preparing for? It is important to remember that the northern Advent period is characterized by long hours of winter darkness. The struggle between dark and light is dramatically experienced in the winter months, and often, no less in our own lives. In this second week of Advent we are invited to reflect on God’s promise of mercy and faithfulness for all people and for our world even in times of darkness, doubt and isolation. » Click here to read more

Third Sunday of Advent

There is neither ambiguity nor naïveté in regard to the call to mission and ministry in the readings of this Third Week of Advent. We are ‘to bring good news to the poor, to bind up the hearts that are broken.’ (Isaiah 61:2) We are directed ‘to be happy at all times’ and to ‘give thanks’ and ‘pray constantly,’ because this is what God expects of us ‘in Christ Jesus.’ (Thess. 5:16) The gospel presents a model of wholehearted commitment to mission and ministry in John the Baptist who described himself as sent to ‘witness to speak for the light…a voice that cries in the wilderness’ to ‘prepare the way of the Lord.’ (John 1:7, 23) » Click here to read more

Fourth Sunday of Advent

How quickly for most of us have these weeks flown! As Christmas comes closer we hear people talking about what gifts they might be buying or hoping for. Festivities abound, and many of us find we have little time to really think beyond the immediate demands of each day. The closing of the year and our commitments to catch up with family and friends can take up every spare moment. It is not easy to give ourselves the most precious gift of time to think, to attend to what we hope for -  the desires of our heart -  this season, and subsequently for the coming year. » Click here to read more

Christmas Day

Christmas is here! What does this mean for us, not in terms of gift-giving, but in relation to the deepest desires of our hearts? This time of Advent has been a call to us to revive, to bring to life again what it means to live our Baptismal witness in today's world. Yet it is so hard to keep this awareness in balance with all the other activities, commitments, and images from all aspects of our ever-demanding lives, no matter how well we started our Advent preparations. What difference does Christmas really make? Many non-Christians also ask why the coming of Christ into the world should be celebrated when, two thousand years later, there is still massive poverty, violence, and breakdown in trust throughout the world. We may even be asking these same questions ourselves. » Click here to read more

Light the World Campaign