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Perspectives on the Heights

As part of the Sesquicentennial Celebration, Boston College Chronicle correspondent Reid Oslin interviewed eight individuals who offer interesting insights on Boston College's history.

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William M. Hogan, Jr. ’33
William M. Hogan, Jr. ’33 was born on April 14, 1912—the same week as two other notable events occurred: the opening of Boston’s famed Fenway Park and the sinking of the ocean liner Titanic. Hogan died in 2012, soon after this interview was published.

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Robert D. Blute, Sr. ’43
Dr. Robert D. Blute, Sr. ’43 arrived at Boston College in September 1939 during the same week that Germany invaded Poland to ignite World War II. His four-year undergraduate career was one of accelerated courses, a constantly changing student population, the heartbreak of personal loss, and a greatly limited collegiate social experience, as America—and Boston College—prepared for war.

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John L. Mahoney '50
Few faculty members in the 150-year history of Boston College have achieved such a fulfilling life’s work of distinguished scholarship and widespread reverence as Thomas F. Rattigan Professor of English Emeritus John L. Mahoney '50, a treasured member of the University’s academic community since his own undergraduate days in the late 1940s.

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Margaret “Peg” Kenney '57
Mathematics professor Margaret “Peg” Kenney grew up in a BC family and was a member of the second class of women in the School of Education when she enrolled as a freshman in 1953. After completing her master's degree, she began her teaching career at Boston College as a graduate assistant in 1957 and moved up through the teaching ranks to full professor in 1992. She retired last spring, 60 years after she first came to Boston College as an undergraduate.

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Wayne Budd ’63
Wayne Budd ’63, who was one of only three African-Americans in his freshman class, went on to become president of his senior class, a position that provided him the opportunity of introducing poet Robert Frost to the undergraduate body when the famed poet visited campus in 1963.

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Clare Schoenfeld ’72
Clare Schoenfeld, who grew up down the street from Boston College and whose father, Richard Schoenfeld '43, was president of the University's Alumni Association, was the only female member of the School of Management’s graduating class in 1972.

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Doug Flutie ’85
Few Boston College alumni are as well-known as Doug Flutie ’85, Heisman Trophy winner, long-time professional football player and current NBC television college football analyst. But Flutie might have wound up at Harvard if newly-hired BC coach Jack Bicknell hadn’t offered him BC’s last remaining scholarship for that year.

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Setti Warren ’93
Newton Mayor Setti Warren ’93 has always been a natural leader. He was a four-time class president at Newton North High School, and as a junior, helped bring racial and ethnic harmony to the school after a clash between rival groups. A history major at BC, Warren became the second African-American to be elected president of the Undergraduate Government of Boston College in the school’s history.